#1
Not sure if this is in the right section so appologies if not.

i wonder if anyone can help, ive been playing guitar around a year . i take a 1 hour lesson every two weeks and i feel i am pretty much on course but i would like to develop my ear to be able to work track out myself.

With my teacher i have done some interval ear training wich helps with working out solos ect, im still not good at this but with the more common intervals im right about 80% of the time.

Ive been shown ways such as finding the key first and then just trail and eeror with chords within the key but i find myself getting this wrong a lot, i even get major and minor mixed up within songs (never on there own though) I was also shown another where you disregard the key at first and try and work out the progression. I am really struggling with this and i know its not going to happen quickly but it seems i will never get there. i have bought an ear training book and cd but again this is just for intervals.

any help or suggestions is much appreciated. thanks in advance. Danny
#2
My best advice is to work on easy songs at first and work your way up to harder songs.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#3
do half an hour of eartraining everyday, as long as its everyday half an hour is plenty
you'll get better on your own rate

first of all you need to get to the point of knowing every interval right away no errors
be sure to also train them in bass range, this makes it easier to hear the root movement

the root movement is what you need to know to know the progression, not just trial and error, practise singing the root of every chord and at the same time classify the chord as minor major dominant diminshed or augmented and maybe also minormajor (work on extensions later)

learning to distinguish chords is not as hard as it may look now, just find an eartraining program that makes you name the chords like earmaster or musictheory.net

if you're not sure where to start on progressions, learn the sound of I IV and V by heart

and ofcourse try to figure out any song you hear, its great exercise whether you pull it off or not
#5
Quote by nonstopdanny
Not sure if this is in the right section so appologies if not.

i wonder if anyone can help, ive been playing guitar around a year . i take a 1 hour lesson every two weeks and i feel i am pretty much on course but i would like to develop my ear to be able to work track out myself.

With my teacher i have done some interval ear training wich helps with working out solos ect, im still not good at this but with the more common intervals im right about 80% of the time.

Ive been shown ways such as finding the key first and then just trail and eeror with chords within the key but i find myself getting this wrong a lot, i even get major and minor mixed up within songs (never on there own though) I was also shown another where you disregard the key at first and try and work out the progression. I am really struggling with this and i know its not going to happen quickly but it seems i will never get there. i have bought an ear training book and cd but again this is just for intervals.

any help or suggestions is much appreciated. thanks in advance. Danny


Well, it's a matter of experience. The more you do it, the better you get at it. You have to be willing to make the mistakes at 1st as you develop the skill. There are no shortcuts really. It's something that take practice & time.

So pick a piece of music you like. Learn it, play it, internalize it.... enjoy it. Find another.... and another. keep at it.

eventually what took hours to learn, may only take minutes. That's been my experience anyway.
shred is gaudy music
#6
its all to do with ears and time. Some people can do it in minutes but it takes me hours-days even for some songs... it just takes practise and time so keep at it, figuring out powerchord songs is really easy to start off with
GEAR :


Ibanez SA260FM
Burswood Strat Copy
Marshall GV-2 Distortion
Crate FlexWave 120 Amp


#8
I hate to sound like a broken record, but it is just practise.

Maybe get your teacher to play you a series of chords and then ask you to name the quality of the middle one..

Also, keep in mind that a lot of the melody will be chord tones. If you have the melody down and you are playing a chord over it that doesn't have that note... chances are it's likely to be wrong.

Here is a few easier songs to find the chords:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HutE0y96fkY Eskimo Joe - Sarah
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xx3yXUunEq8 Garry Moore - Still got the blues
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzMUfYpCwQk Bob Marley - Waiting in Vain

these all have vocal melody based on chord tones and simple bass lines you should be able to pick up.
#9
To add to all the other good information in this thread, I would suggest when you are trying to work out a melody or a solo you should:

1. Find the starting note, basically just play lots of notes on the guitar till you get the right one.

2. This is the important bit. Listen to the next note then before you just use trial and error to find it, guess where it is. Think to yourself, is it higher or lower than the previous one? How much higher? If you're wrong (which it is likely you will be at the beginning) then just go up or down till you find the right note.

By doing this you will develop a memory for what sound equates to what interval (measured in frets, tones, however you want) and eventually you should be able to know with some certainty what the interval is before you play it.