#1
I think thats what its called, but I saw people connecting the High input of channel 1 to the Low input of channel 2 what does that accomplish?
#2
it feeds your guitar signal into both channels.

Old Marshall amps have 2 inputs per channel, which are connected in parallel. So if you plug your guitar into one input, the other input can be used as a parallel connection to the next channel.

I believe it results in MOAR GAIN
#3
Quote by sashki
it feeds your guitar signal into both channels.

Old Marshall amps have 2 inputs per channel, which are connected in parallel. So if you plug your guitar into one input, the other input can be used as a parallel connection to the next channel.

I believe it results in MOAR GAIN



does it have to go from any certain input to the next, I have a vox and I have the high and low for each channel, does it have to go to high from low or just whichever one you plug into?
#4
on the plexi's the two channels are voiced differently...jumping the cahnnels kinda blends the too together and you get a "bigger" sound and prob more gain
#5
Quote by Orethor
on the plexi's the two channels are voiced differently...jumping the cahnnels kinda blends the too together and you get a "bigger" sound and prob more gain

could this give you a sort of clean overdriven sound? ah, what the hell, thanks, I'm trying this out tommorow, as long as I won't like blow up the amp, what can I lose right?
#6
FYI, this is actually called "jumping"
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#7
Quote by Van Noord
FYI, this is actually called "jumping"

then whats daisy chaining?

and is it possible to jump between two amps? like be playing through channel one of one amp and put it to the second amp?
Last edited by eberg2 at Nov 15, 2009,
#8
Quote by eberg2
then whats daisy chaining?

and is it possible to jump between two amps? like be playing through channel one of one amp and put it to the second amp?


"Daisy Chaining" involves hooking a bunch of pedals together into one signal path. When you start collecting pedals (and you will), you'll get into the ups and downs of daisy chaining them together.

Yes, you can jumper more than one amplifier together. Jimi Hendrix used to run one guitar into three Marshall Super Lead Plexis by jumpering them together.
#9
Quote by FatalGear41
"Daisy Chaining" involves hooking a bunch of pedals together into one signal path. When you start collecting pedals (and you will), you'll get into the ups and downs of daisy chaining them together.

Yes, you can jumper more than one amplifier together. Jimi Hendrix used to run one guitar into three Marshall Super Lead Plexis by jumpering them together.


No no no sir, jumping is when you hook the inputs on one amp to each other, or bypass the effects loop, or use the effects loop with a pedal, by means of a short cable that you use to link the two circuits.

Daisy chaining is linking amps together, and that is what hendrix, and townshend did with their superleads.
#10
Quote by Plexi81
No no no sir, jumping is when you hook the inputs on one amp to each other, or bypass the effects loop, or use the effects loop with a pedal, by means of a short cable that you use to link the two circuits.

Daisy chaining is linking amps together, and that is what hendrix, and townshend did with their superleads.


That's one way of looking at daisy-chaining, but what Hendrix did was to link the amplifiers from the inputs, rather than going from amp output to amp input, which would be a true daisy chain. Its a question of semantics, I suppose. And you are right, jumpering involves hooking the inputs of the amplifier together so that you can use both volume controls (at least, on an old non-master volume Marshall). But that was covered in one of the other responses. I used to jumper my old Hiwatt. It gave it more gain, but it was hell on the tubes.
#11
does this only work(with no negative side effects) with the way marshalls are set up or something?...