#1
Why do so many people make such a big stink about sweep picking? It seems rather odd to me. It's not a particularly difficult technique to learn. The uses are fairly limited. Generally speaking, one only finds sweeping passages in solos, which tend to comprise only a small part of a song. So why do people care so much about it? I would vastly prefer to have a clean alternate picking technique to something flashy like sweeping.
#3
if you think its uses are limited check out Frank Gambale
#5
Sweeping is a divine test, only the Tr00 are granted the coveted third testy.
#6
Quote by Geldin
Why do so many people make such a big stink about sweep picking?
Because they enjoy the sound it produces? Why do some people prefer humbuckers over single coils, or floating trems to hard-tails? It's all preference.

Quote by Geldin
It seems rather odd to me. It's not a particularly difficult technique to learn.
This leads me to believe you haven't tried anything more than a basic minor 3-stringer. It takes time and patient practice to get the motions clean and smooth on larger sweeps. And if that's a psuedo-brag, don't bother, you aren't impressing anyone.

Quote by Geldin
The uses are fairly limited. Generally speaking, one only finds sweeping passages in solos, which tend to comprise only a small part of a song.
It's no different from any other technique: its use is limited to the mind of whoever is using it/writing the song. Try listening to something other than metal.

Quote by Geldin
So why do people care so much about it?

See #1.

Quote by Geldin
I would vastly prefer to have a clean alternate picking technique to something flashy like sweeping.

Good for you. Most people who enjoy having good technique can do both, because they're not idiots who have an either/or mentality towards music.

Now begone, troll.
#7
The guy above me said it all.

...just ignore the OP, he has no idea what he's talking about.
Quote by Junior#1
Gilbert mutes with both hands. Palm muting and left hand muting. As for anchoring, he doesn't. He doesn't need to. After all, he's the creator of life, the universe, and everything.
#8
harsh people are harsh.
Gear

Fender Stratocaster, "Band of Gypsies" Model.
Fender j5 Triple Deluxe Telecaster
Orange Tiny Terror Combo
#9
Quote by legendkillerlb
harsh people are harsh.

It's not harsh at all. He came to the Techniques board asking "what's the big deal" about a particular technique that is clearly popular and widely used.

That's like me going to the Metal board and asking them to recommend me some Trivium
Pretty blatant trolling.
#10
I don't think he's trolling at all, the amounts of threads we get on sweep picking and the relative ignorance of the relevant TS leads pretty quickly to the idea that sweeping is poorly understood and "overrated" in the sense that people are much more interested in sweep picking compared to it's relative lack of usefulness from their level of musical understanding.

That's one huge sentence.
#11
Quote by ng117
jason becker

Quote by winnipegbassist
jeff loomis

Both have excellent technique all around.

[quote="Rikki DeMartini=This leads me to believe you haven't tried anything more than a basic minor 3-stringer. It takes time and patient practice to get the motions clean and smooth on larger sweeps. And if that's a psuedo-brag, don't bother, you aren't impressing anyone.[/QUOTE"]
I sweep quite well, actually. Practicing it effectively at a low speed, one can master this technique much faster then string skipping, tapping, or finger picking (at least in my experience). Furthermore, I'm not trying to brag - that wasn't my purpose at all.

Quote by Rikki DeMartini
It's no different from any other technique: its use is limited to the mind of whoever is using it/writing the song. Try listening to something other than metal.

I love when people assume the only music that guitarists listen to is metal. That just goes to show how close minded they are and how quickly they jump to conclusions that they have no support for. Generally speaking, sweeping is reserved primarily for solos or fill parts.

Quote by Rikki DeMartini
Good for you. Most people who enjoy having good technique can do both, because they're not idiots who have an either/or mentality towards music.

Oooo.... I'm so hurt by that. I'm not saying that sweeping is useless. I'm curious as to why there is such an obsession with a limited technique when one could put that time more effectively towards skills that will see more use, like alternate picking or legato.

Quote by Rikki DeMartini
Pretty blatant trolling.

Trolling? Really? In what ways am I trolling? Trolling is purposefully asking an obviously incendiary or irrelevant question to try to draw people into useless discussions thereof. I'm asking about a preference for technique - the way in which I have done so is conforming to the rules and it's relevant to the board.

Quote by Rikki DeMartini
That's like me going to the Metal board and asking them to recommend me some Trivium

Just a side note here, but even though the metal board won't admit it, most reliable sources have called Trivium's two most recent albums metal rather then metalcore, but that's a debate for another time and another board.
#12
It's great for getting from one side of the neck to the other quickly (E to e) and when changing from one scale to another, and sounds great at the same time.

And it sounds pretty badass while soloing (within reason, if you sweep too much you look like a bit of a douche, but that's my preference.)

EDIT: And as to why people make a rather large fuss about it, is simple. Some (if not most) guitarists who traverse this site listen to bands who implement CRAZY sweeps into their songs (such as Rusty Cooley, a few Lamb of God songs, most of Dragonforces discography, Yngwie Malmsteen, etc.) and strive for that kind of perfection in their own sweeps. When they fail at achieving that perfection after their first attempt at them, they whine about it here, and are then told to continue practicing.

Long story short, people shoot for much higher expectations than they can actually achieve with a rather difficult technique, and complain about it here, which is why there's a big fuss about sweeps.

/mindless ramblings.
You know, you're probably reading this saying "Hey, I'm bored, maybe this'll be funny?"
It's not. Too bad. No, I am not refunding you those 6 seconds of your life. So :P


Last edited by Snap017 at Nov 15, 2009,
#13
It's only useless and limited depending on how you write your songs. I use them a fair bit, not just as solos, but as melody carriers.
#14
Listen to Mea Culpa by The human abstract. I have a tabz0rz for it. the last 2 minutes are EPIC AS BAWLS sweeps. its crazy.
#16
Check out Yngwie Malmsteen's Asylum songs, most of it is sweeping...anyone can say they can sweep, but mastering it is a whole different story
#17
I've been playing for about 6-7 months now and I practice sweeping when I play. I can't think of anything else that seems to have more of a positive effect on my overall playing. It seems the better I get at sweeping, the better my overall playing becomes. I can play in sync better, move across the fretboard faster and easier, and things feel much more automatic. I notice myself incorporating sweep picking (I guess it would be economy picking?) into all aspects of my playing and everything sounds smoother. It has helped my muting tremendously.

However, I would in no way say "I can sweep".
#18
^
That's not because of sweeping, though. The practice you've put into learning to sweep has made you realize that your muting is imperfect and that it needs work. Consequently, you become more skilled at muting. The synchronization thing is the same. Also, if you can sweep pick an arpeggio, you can sweep. Now, play masterfully like Paul Waggoner or Jason Becker, perhaps not, but you certainly can perform the technique.