#1
ok, so thursday night, i played an open mic at the Caffe Lena(!!!), and looking back, I really was killing my voice all night. I drank a cup of coffee when I got there, which burnt my mouth, and made me really flemy(sp), and thats all I drank all night. Plus I hadn't eaten all day, so I just mowed down a bag of really salty sunflower seed, which made my throat really dry. And on top of everything else, I was really nervous and smoked like 8 cigs while I was there. But the funny thing is, I KILLED. I was fantastic, belting out lyrics, which I really didnt know I could do. And from videos my friend took, I sounded really good, better than usual. So, did I get lucky, or is this something I can do regularly for enhanced vocal effect?
#2
I stay away from dairy and anything salty when I know I'm going to perform. I do a shot or two of whiskey and lime before singing and also suck on werthers originals during the day to coat my throat. Unless you do your coffee black, tea is best before singing if you still need the caffeine.
#3
Ummmm..... I wouldn't. Maybe it was just something about the vibe of the venue or something that made you extra confident.

I would attribute your success to something like that long before I attributed it to a bad diet and half a pack of smokes.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#4
That is absolutely not a good idea. You probably like the tone you're getting because it's rough. There's absolutely a better and more healthy way of getting that tone. If you're only playing maybe one gig every two weeks or something, you might get away with doing that, but it's still a gamble as to whether you'll even be able to hit notes consistently throughout the night. I'm not even necessarily an avid supporter of impeccable technique, but this is just a poor idea.
#5
^how can you get that rough tone in a healthier way tho? Cause i have been wondering that for like 3 years now, and noone seems to know the answer.
Joža je kul. On ma sirove z dodatki pa hambije.
#6
Quote by gorkyporky
^how can you get that rough tone in a healthier way tho? Cause i have been wondering that for like 3 years now, and noone seems to know the answer.


I think it's focusing the resonance on the back of the soft palate, or something. I'll go look it up now.

Edit: Yep, it's taking a strong breath, pushing from your diaphragm, and putting all the resonance into your soft palate. The throat must be kept open and relaxed, and you should never feel like you are singing from the lower throat.
Quote by Oh_God_Its_Back
My girlfriend does that to me!
Feels pretty good!

^In a thread about strap-ons.
Last edited by Jimbosandwich at Nov 15, 2009,
#7
Quote by gorkyporky
^how can you get that rough tone in a healthier way tho? Cause i have been wondering that for like 3 years now, and noone seems to know the answer.


I'm under the impression it's by using proper technique, but increasing the vibrations at the back of your throat. That's what it feels like to me anyway. Theoretically it's easier with phlem because it's sitting in the area you are supposed to vibrate and you can identify it easier, but with proper training you should be able to identify the area without the phlem indicator
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#8
Quote by Jimbosandwich
taking a strong breath, pushing from your diaphragm, and putting all the resonance into your soft palate.


.... and..... nodes in six months.

Taking an adequate breath, holding your diaphragm, and putting resonance in your hard palate is where good technique starts.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
Quote by axemanchris
.... and..... nodes in six months.

Taking an adequate breath, holding your diaphragm, and putting resonance in your hard palate is where good technique starts.

CT


"Now that you understand that you must keep an open throat, redirect the focus of you voice into the soft palate and apply the Power Push, let me explain to you how to produce a gritty tone. Here is THE true secret to screaming and producing grit that everyone has been waiting for. Are you ready??? Drum roll please...NEVER FEEL IT IN THE THROAT---ALWAYS FEEL IT IN THE SOFT PALATE!!!!!!!" (Vendera, 310)

Quoted directly from Jaime Vendera's "Raise Your Voice"
Quote by Oh_God_Its_Back
My girlfriend does that to me!
Feels pretty good!

^In a thread about strap-ons.
#11
"Do not aim the voice at the soft palate."

Quoted directly from practically every single opera singer ever.

Or more specifically....

"These performers have been taught to project their voices a great distance without using amplification. The resonance that we wish to use in singing is that which is produced on a hard surface....is known as the hard palate.... it is the sounding board of the voice."

"The Bel Canto Technique" (c. 1986)
Edward L. Johnson - tenor, Metropolitan Opera

??

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
It really depends on the style you're singing too. I personally don't really like the sound of Jaime Vendera's high end at all. Total butt rock. I prefer the sound of the breakup coming from the hard palate and face, but it's a preference thing. For what I do, kind of a Chris Cornell inspired belting sound, the soft palate is too weak. I'll kind of switch to a different placement now and then, and I always find myself unsatisfied with the soft palate sound. It's good for some stuff, but I'm not not really into it.

I think it's really worth noting that your technique is ABSOLUTELY contingent on what style you're doing. I'm a firm believer that there is no one vocal technique that is absolutely excellent for every single style and sound out there. Classical technique is great...for classical. If you want an aggressive sound, it's not gonna cut it. Classical musicians do not use grit in their voice ever, so it's unreasonable to assume they would know how to produce it properly. Similarly, Jaime Vendera's instruction would be simply unacceptable by classical standards. Can you imagine Pavarotti screeching like the wicked witch of the west?

You also have to accept that to a degree, your vocal mechanism does not like to make a gritty sound, period. That sound means your vocal cords or overloaded or irritated. It's always an effort to find a "most healthy" way of getting an aggressive sound, rather than a completely healthy way of doing it. There's a way to do minimal damage, and sing for hours without killing yourself, but getting tired is the nature of the beast when you're doing overdriven vocals.
#13
My instructor, Ed's, students were world-class producer Daniel Lanois, Triumph co-vocalist and drummer Gil Moore, Coney Hatch vocalist Andy Curran, pop songstress Lisa DalBello, acclaimed blues singer Rita Chiarelli, Vacation co-star actress Beverly D'Angelo, and Canadian singer-songwriter Ian Thomas. Edward has also taught other singers who have gone onto successful careers in the opera field. One of Ed's greatest success stories was Brian Vollmer from multi-platinum Canadian hard rock icons, Helix.

So, using this operatic technique, you have singers from opera, to musical theatre, to folk and roots, to blues, to pop, to hard rock to hair metal.

I use it for pop/hard-rock.

Good singing is good singing. It just matters how you apply it.

Now, yes, Brian from Helix 'puts on' a certain amount of vocal effect when he records with Helix. He will often sing cleaner live to make sure he doesn't damage his voice.

So, I have proof that a classical technique can be used for other styles.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#14
I'm sure that worked well for them, but there are plenty of other instructors/methods that don't teach Bel Canto that have VERY big names to their credit. I know Speech Level Singing has a sickening, staggering amount of Grammy winners, and huge pop stars, amongst the likes of Michael Jackson that subscribe to its method. David Kyle taught students that include Layne Staley, Geoff Tate, Ann Wilson, and Chris Cornell, but what he did was far from Bel Canto. Mark Baxter taught Steven Tyler and Scott Weiland, also not a Bel Canto instructor. What it comes down to is using a technique that works for whatever you're doing. If there was a method that tackled every genre effectively, for every person out there, there wouldn't be different techniques and methods. I listened to a few Helix songs on YouTube, and heard a few examples of your singing, and while both are good in their own right, that is not the type of sound I'm going for, so I subscribe to a different method. I think for me, and for the style I sing, the technique I use is the best, but I don't think it would have worked for Michael Jackson, or Pavarotti, or even some people on this forum.
#15
Fair enough in that regard.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.