#1
K well, basically, im a bass range. I can reach from low E to high E/F, and im told that i have a really good voice. The only thing is that im into rock/metal/punk music, and I cant sing most of the music i like because majority of the lead singers are tenors, and can reach higher notes. Im planning on starting a band, hopefully as lead guitar and vocals, but i wanna ask a few questions first

1. Are there any really good/famous lead vocalists in rock bands that also have a bass range?

2. Are there any lead singers who sing in the middle octaves and sound good and have still been successful?

I've always enjoyed singing, and i took vocal lessons for half a year. But if theres no point and i know that im not gonna get anywhere with it, i'd rather just be backup and lead guitar =P
#2
Quote by Terowyn
1. Are there any really good/famous lead vocalists in rock bands that also have a bass range?

pete steele from type o negative
#3
I'd recommend you to listen to a brazilian band whose singer has a really great bass voice,but I'm not sure you'd really like it,though I think you should give it a try,the band's name is Moveis Coloniais De Acaju,if you search them on youtube you might find some really good stuff.
By the way,John Mayer,Eddie Vedder and Jack Johnson are really successful and they're all baritones(I think),and I'm certain there's more.
#4
I'm familiar with your exact situation, but I'm a classical singer mostly, so it's a bit easier for me. The reality is that you can't do what all of those guys in the screaming loud rock bands do. A low voice is going to have an extremely rough time competing with exploding loud guitars. You never want to push your voice either and sacrifice good tone quality for a higher register. What you're going to want to do is find a unique instrumentation that suits your unique voice. Singing with an acoustic ensemble, or some sort of ensemble that lets your voice be the most powerful instrument is very important for a rock singer with a lower register. Being able to sing well is a gift that no matter what voice part you have, you should use to the best of your ability. Also, Jim Morrison of The Doors sang in a lower register, and made a very successful rock career out of it.
#5
Leonard Cohen, especially his more recent stuff/live performances, is waaay down in the bass range - his voice was described as, "residing several fathoms beneath sea level" by some reviewer. His live show also has about 6 instrumentalists (half of whom also sing backing vocals) and 3 female backing singers (two of whom played the odd bit of harp & guitar), so it's pretty full, arrangement-wise and his voice still comes through it well. Obviously that's partially having good people doing the mixing, but it is definitely possible to arrange really good, full songs that accomodate a low singer.
Quote by Ed O'Brien
“It’s not genius. It’s just that if you want something good to come out of something, you have to put in a lot of effort. That involves a lot of hard work, and a lot of blood, sweat and tears sometimes.”

http://urbanscarecrow.bandcamp.com/
#6
I gotta ask, is low E your lowest note or is it the lowest note you can comfortably sing?

Cause when I started I thought I was a bass just because I could barely hit a low E, but then I realized that the ranges you see for every voice type don't include the extreme low and high notes. Anyway, if you actually are a bass there's nothing wrong with just transposing the song you want to sing. You shouldn't limit yourself on your voice type, it's much better to adapt the songs you want to sing than just singing songs that fit your range in the original key.
#7
Quote by Terowyn
1. Are there any really good/famous lead vocalists in rock bands that also have a bass range?


Les Claypool of Primus?
#8
I don't think there's much of a disadvantage. Elvis was pretty big. Ditto Johnny Cash, Frank Sinatra, Morrissey, Eric Burdon(the Animals), David Bowie, Jim Morrisson, Ian Curtis, Mark Lanegan, Julian Casablancas, and so on and so forth.
#9
It's totally possible to sing in a higher range. I'm in the same boat as you. My lowest comfortable note is a low E as well (not including vocal fry) and I, over a couple years, developed a pretty strong voice in the upper registers. I can do a pretty strong soprano high A now (17th fret high E on a guitar). Don't be discouraged.
#11
Quote by Declan87
Elvis was pretty big. Frank Sinatra, Morrissey, Eric Burdon(the Animals), David Bowie, Jim Morrisson,


Not sure about some of the others, but none of these guys are basses.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
Quote by Chaingarden
I can do a pretty strong soprano high A now (17th fret high E on a guitar).




CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#14
Quote by Chaingarden
Not sure what to make of this, hahah.


I think he meant: "It's falsetto - well supported falsetto, but still falsetto. Not really full voice." .
#15
Zing! You WIN!



CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#17
Quote by Ceresz
Wow, what's prize ?


She even does music.....



CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#18
Haha, great prize. Thanks! And to get back on topic, I don't think you should worry about your range. Being able to hit a E4/F4 isn't bad, so I wouldn't worry about it. Just work on your voice in general and you'll be fine. Most tenors in todays music doesn't go that much higher. Not many of them are able to reach the tenor high C (C5) . Daniel Gildenlöw from Pain of Salvation is a bass-baritone (at least I think he is) and uses his lower range just as much as he uses his upper range, and he sounds great! So just keep at it, if you have a good voice people will like it even if you can't wail on a high C.
#20
Quote by Chaingarden
*shrug* A note's a note, man. Tell that to Myles Kennedy, or Jeff Buckley, or Robert Plant. Guess you can't tell that to Jeff Buckley. Okay, that was mean.


Well, I agree with a note being a note. As long as it sounds good, I don't really care if it's falsetto or not. A5 is still pretty amazing to me, even if it's falsetto. I would love to be able to hit that note in falsetto, as long as it sounds good.
Last edited by Ceresz at Nov 23, 2009,