#1
So is the only difference in between firewire and USB 2.0 speed? or does firewire produce superior sound quality? I only ask because I'm thinking about this

http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/MAudio-FastTrack-Ultra-USB-2.0-Audio-Interface?sku=241806

this will allow me to record a small drum set atleast I hope and it's a decent price or is this that much better?

http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/MAudio-ProFire-610-Firewire-Recording-Interface?sku=247046

also will reaper work with both of these?
Last edited by Captain Capo at Nov 15, 2009,
#2
Since it's digital, the loss of sound quality is in the encoding, not in the cabling. Although i think due to the different set up of firewire and USB's bus speeds they travel in slightly different ways the raw data going in will be exactly the same as the data coming out no matter which cable type so the only difference in digital data comes from the recording/digitising source.

As for the speed debate, there isn't an awful lot in it, firewire is slightly faster for large volumes of data. but that difference is marginal at best (you're talking only 1 part in 1000 which is an extra second on a 20 minute transfer). USB is more commonly supported than firewire however. If you have firewire ready stuff than go for the extra speed, if not go for the normally more available usb, but don't worry about data quality, neither "loses" anything.
#4
The only time you really need to go with firewire over USB is when you will be recording many tracks at once, around eight. So you should not have a problem with four tracks with USB but if you were to do more than that I would consider firewire.
Originally posted by arrrgg
When my grandpa comes over to visit, after his shower, he walks around naked to dry off
#5
ooh yer - i forgot to mention - it also slightly depends on buffering. If you have more data going into the cable than coming out, then you need somewhere to store the data till you can transfer it. Both can handle ~400Mbps, CD audio ~1.4Mbps. That means either can take ~250 CD audio quality data streams before you start hitting limits. If you're even hitting 1/10 of that with a home recording rig than you're doing something spectacular... not a bad thing to have some buffer if it all starts screwing up though.
#7
Yes it is.
Originally posted by arrrgg
When my grandpa comes over to visit, after his shower, he walks around naked to dry off
#8
Quote by Captain Capo
So is the only difference in between firewire and USB 2.0 speed? or does firewire produce superior sound quality? I only ask because I'm thinking about this

http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/MAudio-FastTrack-Ultra-USB-2.0-Audio-Interface?sku=241806

this will allow me to record a small drum set atleast I hope and it's a decent price or is this that much better?

http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/MAudio-ProFire-610-Firewire-Recording-Interface?sku=247046

also will reaper work with both of these?


Firewire sends data in a continuous stream, USB in chunks, for audio I hope you can see the benefit of a continuous stream of data as opposed to chunks of it, Firewire deals more efficiently with the data.

Please bare in mind that neither of these interfaces have ADAT so neither are expandable should you wish to have more channels, also that you can get a second hand Presonus FP10 for less than the cost of both of these interfaces if you buy second hand.

You want at least 8 channels to record drums, 4 is gonna be a trouble.
#9
Thanks beefmo, I've got so many questions man its crazy I guess I should start by letting you guys know what I'm wanting to accomplish. I need to be able to record atleast a decent sized drum kit and I also need my whole setup to be somewhat transportable so I'm really starting to think that a rack mounted computer is gonna be the way togo I noticed that you can get a whole host of parts for them and could make some really nice stuff even on a decent budget since I've already got a decent desktop if I could get a rackmounted case I would just transport my goodies into that including a internal interface, which brings me to the question does anyone sell those rackmounted case's without the parts in them if so who? and also how would you go about building a machine like that spec wise? sorry for the wall of text but I'm real interested in this kinda stuff
Last edited by Captain Capo at Nov 15, 2009,
#10
Quote by Beefmo

You want at least 8 channels to record drums, 4 is gonna be a trouble.


Don't buy the "more is better" mantra.

Fact: The more mics (mics, not triggers, y'all) you set up on drums, the more phase cancellation, noise, bleed, resonance, and eq problems you'll run in.

Mic'ing drums with 4 mics works very well:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krUPsqXUBSs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypxsCt2br0E


Drum Recording 101, Simple steps to recording a drum set:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KiFkMZSYORY

You should google "recording drums 4-mic".
#11
It depends what you're recording. If you're recording a talented drummer in a jazz group or something, a couple of overheads and a kick and snare mic to augment in for a bit of punch is gonna be just fine, if you're recording anything more dense than that, you're going to want close mics on everything.

kick,
snare
bottom snare if you dont want to sound like an amateuristic, talentless ****
and at a minimum, 2 rack toms and a floor tom.
that's 6
then 2 overheads

and if youre doing anything denser than straight up rock (anything within the giant musical umbrella that is metal pretty much,) you'll probably want triggers too so you can blend in samples for consistensy.


But see the thing is man, the majority of drummers are talentless halfwits who cannot play in time or tune their kits properly.
4 mics is NOT going to work.
You want to leave yourself as many options as possible to SALVAGE shit performances, anything else is just sheer doe-eyed idealism. And while aspiring to one day record a drummer capable of making 2, 3, maybe 4 mics sound awesome is noble and all, it's not going to feasibly happen for any of us unless you reach professional level and end up doing this day after day for a living.
8 inputs, MINIMUM. No ****ing excuses.
#12
The glyn johns mic technique is only useful if you have a really good drummer, who's not going to go crazy on the tom fills. As Gareth says that rules out pretty much every drummer on the planet who's not in some jazz band.

If you said 16 mics was too many, you'd be right, for a beginner that would be overcomplicating, but around 8 is going to get you good definition on the whole kit because nobody wants to listen to toms coming in purely from the OH's.
#13
and even then, like 90% of the jazz i listen to has all close miced drums too
its only a few specific old school trad jazz albums that can really get away with it
#14
Quote by Dream Pin


4 mics is NOT going to work.
You want to leave yourself as many options as possible to SALVAGE shit performances....


Hey, no one said you can't stick a trigger on each drum component and midify such performances with this piece of magic ...




... and massage them with the help of a little sampling/quantization/dynamics magic...

I've never ran in a situation where I couldn't cancel out trailing decays with one of the overheads tracks if it ever was too obvious that a few samples of the recorded drumkit were dropped here and there.
#15
Theres only one problem with your solution and thats that it involves spending more money anyway.

The OP might as well get an 8 channel interface for less than your solution and not do a botch patch up job with a half miced/half triggered kit.

If you're going to go the sturgis route you'd be as well doing two OH's and then triggering the rest with Redshot Pros into an 8 channel interface.
#16
>2 tracks at once, Firewire. Drumset- or full band recording needs f.wire
else, USB is OK.
#17
Quote by GisleAune
else, USB is OK.


not in this day and age of firewire cards being a tenner and zero latency VST amp simulation recording
#18
It's all really down to whether you can spend enough dough to get a firewire interface because they're the high end ones.
#19
you can get a firewire interface on the cheap: see m-audio, presonus, mbox 2 pro, etc. of course firewire's going to be faster, more stable, etc., but it's not the be-all end-all to a home setup.

edit: though if what you're trying to say is that a comparable firewire interface is going to be more expensive than USB, that's completely true.
#20
No doubt the drummer is talented he plays a single kick with double pedal's that sound like triggers with just his feet lol I'm gonna need 8 mics, so now the question is which 8 mics interface is good I'll do some looking to find out, do any of you have experience with RME Hammerfall cards?
#21
Quote by Captain Capo
...
do any of you have experience with RME Hammerfall cards?


Plenty here after moving away from Digidesign.
RME is problem free as long as you set up dedicated configurations. (Windows without Iexplorer, Windows Media etc, google "xplite"). 32 track mixing on a amd XP 2400 processor and 2 GBs. A bit sterile and harsh in the high end but quiet as a mouse.