Page 1 of 2
#1
OK... so, I've been thinkng of swaping out my speakers for a while now, and I have tried a variety of different makers' models, but the realization that I tried these so long ago hit me like a ton of bricks! There I was trying to recall what they all sounded like, and what cab they were loaded into, and which head was cranked through 'em, etc...

...as anyone who's shopped around for speakers before can tell you, there's not a ton of resources out there besides youtube and makers' website clips. outside of the occational v30-loaded cab, there's also not a lot of opportunities for people to go try out higher-end replacement speakers.

Amps, guitars and pickups get all the love, but speakers are the last thing in your chain before your signal hits a mic, and they have a huge impact on your tone. With that in mind, I bring you this thread so that we might have a discussion board dedicated to "things that go bump in the night."

Anyone is free to post their experiences with any speaker they have used or heard FIRST HAND... please also include amp and cab used, along with anything else you find pertinant to your sound with regards to the speaker's preformance.

Also, this is a great place for anyone seeking info on speakers to post their specific questions. Happy posting.
#2
Thanks to Mark G's suggestion, I present to you...

SPEAKERS 101: part 1.

Ok guys, I'm gonna keep this simple for now. If you want more stuff, like QTS, FS, VAS, etc. lem'me know or post it yourself. We're going to focus here on the basics: impedance, power rating, frequency response, materials, configurations, stuff like that. Bear with me, this is my first attempt at a "lesson" and I might be a little scatter-brained with the arrangement.

First thing's first. This is GG&A, so IN THIS THREAD we're only going to deal with guitar cab speakers. this means 99% of the time we'll be talking about 12" speakers with 16,8 or 4ohm impedance in single, 2x12, 4x12, and full stack configurations.

IMPEDANCE:

Impedance VS. Resistance: Impedance is the AC measurement of your speaker represented in ohms (omega symbol, or "horse shoe shaped thingy"), whereas resistance is the DC measurement also measured in ohms. While a particular speaker will have a given rating for impedance, say 16ohm, it's important to understand that impedance varies by frequency (where resistance is constant, usually in the 14.5-15.5ohm range for a 16ohm speaker). For example, that same 16ohm speaker might have an impedance of 20ohm at or below 100Hz, 15ohm around the mids, and ramps back up to 50ohm or so in the extended highs. You can imagine how this impacts the frequency response of the speaker. As a variable linear function, keep in mind that the given impedance chart for one speaker does not neccessarily translate to another.

What does impedance do? It "impedes" your signal. That is, for a lack of a better term, it restrains it. When you look at an impedace Vs. frequency chart (usually printed in the PDF infosheet for most major manufacturers), the areas of etremely high impedance in the low-lows and highs usually corrolates directly to that speaker's useable frequency range.

You're probably thinking right now that lower impedance speakers must be better than higher rated ones, because they restrain your frequencies less, right? Wrong... sort of. 9 times out of 10 I reccommend that people use higher impedances for the two following reasons:

(1) The extremely impedance peaks in the lows and highs act as natural filters, high and low passes, respectively. In other words, as a guitarist, they help to carve out your place in the mix. If you had a lower impedance peak in the lows with, say, an 8ohm speaker than you would with 16ohms, your "natural high-pass filter" would be weaker. This means it'd be easier to step on your bassist's toes EQ-wise. It's not a pronounced difference, but the next reason is...

(2) Lower impedances require your amp to work harder for the same results, often resulting in premature thermal failure (over-heating). I'm gonna' make up some numbers for easy math: let's say your head pumps out 50w at 16ohm, 100w at 8ohm, 200w at 4ohm... get the picture? The outcome is comparable to cranking your amp to 11 for every second that it's off standby. After extended periods of making your amp work like this, your transformer won't be your friend anymore... tubes will stop returning your calls... Less restraint = more output = working harder.

We'll take a break from impedance to briefly discuss some other things, but we'll revisit it later as it ties directly into configurations.

POWER RATING:

The power rating of your speaker is expressed in wattage. Typically, guitar speakers range from about 20w to 100w (though some are rated lower and higher than that). The materials used in speaker construction (magnet, cone material, etc.) as well as the construction method itself plays a MAJOR ROLE in the speaker's power rating (they also directly affect frequency response). Case and point: although they each use similar materials, Celestion Vintage 30's, Mesa V30's made in the UK, and Eminence's take on the V30 (the "Governor") each have a different power rating, respectively 60w, 70w, and 75w.

Magnets:
The most common speaker magnets used are ceramic (cheapest, most plentyful), neodymium (lightweight, increasingly popular, good selection for reducing handling), and alnico (natural vintage compression, most rare and expensive speaker magnet). Alnico gets its name from being a composite of aluminum, nickle and cobalt. Magnets themselves yeild no tonal properties; however, their positioning, which in turn dictates how and to what extent they're capable of controling the cone does.

Cone:
Materials used in speaker cone production have greatly increased in variety recently. It's not uncommon to find cones made of paper, plastics, kevlar, and even hemp! (in the time it took me to type that, I thought of 3 lame jokes )

Lighter weight materials (paper, for example) tend to break up earlier than more rigid materials (hemp, kevlar). Power rating has little to do with the way a speaker breaks up. That said, speakers with a higher wattage are commonly associated with heavier, more rigid cone materials which break up later.
Last edited by GrisKy at Nov 17, 2009,
#3
SPEAKERS 101: part 2.

So, let's take what we now know and apply it to a cab...

CONFIGURATION:

There are two main areas concerning speaker configurations. They are (1) how you wire your speakers inside an enclosure, and (2) how you connect that cab to your amp (same rules apply to combos). We'll deal with them in that order, though both should be considered simultaneously if you're going for specific results (such as if you plan on hooking up two 4x12 cabs to an 8ohm head).

Series: self-explanatory, consists of connecting the negative (-) leads to the positive (+) leads of the next speaker in the series. The resulting impedance is the SUM of each speaker's individual impedance . The MAX combined wattage is also the sum of each speaker.

Parallel: This is the most common cab wiring method. It simply consists of connecting each negative lead to source/jack (-), and likewise for positive leads (+). Parallel impedance is calculated by dividing the impedance of an individual speaker by the number of speakers . NOTE: for parallel wiring, each speaker's impedance should match, or else you'll potentially end up with an odd-ball cab impedance... and very potentially some more serious issues. Wattage is again the sum of each speaker; HOWEVER, there's a catch! More on this later.

Series/Parallel: NOTE: ALL SPEAKERS' IMPEDANCE AND WATTAGE MUST MUST MUST MATCH!!! Connect the jack (+) to 2 positive speaker leads, connect the jack (-) to the 2 negative leads of the two speakers without a connection to their positive leads. Now connect one unused positive lead to ONE UNUSED negative lead for each speaker (to help simplify, you should connect two pairs of speakers with this last step). The end result is a cab with the same impedance as one speaker and a wattage equal to 4x the value of one speaker.

Ok, a bit more on combined wattage, if you mix speakers with different wattages in the same cab (parallel), it is WISE to use the lowest rated speaker to calculate the cab's power rating. For example, let's say you've got a 4x12 loaded with V30's (60w) and a pair of 100 watters in an x-pattern. Your max handling will be 320w. What that doesn't tell you is that each speaker is pulling equally, meaning that your lower rated speakers are going to overheat more quickly. So, in this example your 320w cab would have a sustained handling of 240w... not a big deal in this case, as 240w should deal with any tube head I know of with ease. It becomes a problem if you're pairing up extremely low watt speakers. let's replace those V30's with some 20w 'greenbacks.' Your max handling is up there at 240w, but your sustained rating is down to 80w. Run your triple rec through that, and those speakers are going to burn out QUICK!

While we're discussing mixing speakers, it's worth your time to think about avoiding pairing speakers with drastically different SPL's ("loudness" measured in decibles, or "db"). If the difference is too great, the louder pair will effectively over power the quieter pair.

Now, for connecting those cabs to your amp! If you're using just one cab it's pretty simple, just match the impedance of your cab with the speaker out of your amp. Be careful to make sure your amp isn't going to over-power your cab. All very straight forward. If you connect two cabs of equal impedance, their combined impedance is half of each cab, or if you were connecting two 8ohm cabs, they would combine for a 4ohm impedance as far as your amp is concerned. It gets a bit tricky when you start combining cabs of varying impedances, like say an 8ohm with a 4ohm cab. the end result is some odd-ball shit like 2.6ohm. Hypothetically, if your amp has a 2ohm speaker out, you could still use a configuration like this, only suffering slight tonal and volume loss. If, like most of us, your lowest speaker out is 4, 8, or 16ohms and you connect this type of configuration, it's probably a good idea to go ahead and start freaking out right about now... NEVER NEVER NEVER NEVER F'n NEVER connect a LOWER CAB IMPEDANCE to a HIGHER AMP IMPEDANCE or else you and your amp will die... the difference is you'll live out the rest of your natural life. Your amp will die almost immediately in a blazing inferno of smoke and fire.

CABS:

Last thing I'm going to briefly touch on is cabs. I'm not going to go into much depth here, so if someone feels like digging deeper be my guest. They certainly pertain greatly to speaker preformance, but there really is a world of variation in them (and I'm getting sick of typing).

Just as a speaker has a resonant frequency (you measure it by lightly flicking the cone and determining it's freq... or if you're a normal human like the rest of us, you read what's printed on the speaker's infosheet), so does a cab. This single measurement is arguably the most important ingredient in determining a cab's usefulness for your purposes, as it factors in such relevant construction features as shape, material density and depth, open/closed back construction, etc. In fact, perhaps the only factors it fails to take under consideration (besides what you load the cab with) is whether your speakers are front loaded or rear loaded and whether or not you've "floated" or otherwise stabalized the cab.

In a nutshell (and to greatly generalize)...

slant: More upward projection.
straight: Highly directional, carries bass better.
high density: Brighter, percussive tone.
low density: Deeper, warmer tone.
depth: More = warmer "blooming" tones.
open back: More high-end response.
closed back: Better low-end response.
front loaded: Tighter, more percussive, better dispertion.
rear loaded: Warmer, more resonant.

Also, just to point out, these are not neccessarily things you can mix and match to the cab you already own. For example, it's highly unlikely that your front loaded cab has an open or removable back. Cabs are designed with these factors in mind before hand along with baffles and wood type, etc. Some cabs, like the Mesa Road King 4x12, even have "meet-ya-half-way" features like a half open back.

Whew, I'm pooped. Post away guys!

-GrisKy
#5
Hemp cones? Now you're not talking about loading the cone in the bong before you walk on stage are ya?
I wonder if Kyuss used hemp cones in their cabs. And if not, why not?

Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#6
Useful info, but MrCarrot already made a speaker thread.
Quote by DeathByDestroyr
What the hell is a G&L.



Quote by Flux'D
Gay & Lesbian I think, the box smelled funny
Greg what did you send me??
#7
Good thread GriskyWhiskey, really opened my eyes to what speakers are and why I don't play acoustic.
"If you're looking for me,
you better check under the sea,
because that's where you'll find me..."
#9
CTS speakers are the best speakers for Fender amps, IMO.
Call me Wes.
Gear:
Fender American Deluxe HSS Strat
Chicago Blues Box Roadhouse
Bad Cat Cougar 5
1957 Gibson GA-5
Ceriatone 18w TMB Combo
Hughes & Kettner Tube Factor
Various Ibanez TS9s
Weber MASS Attenuator
#10
anyone know if evm 12l is good for metal?
Ibanez XPT707 Xiphos
Schecter C-7 Loomis FR

Mesa Boogie Mark III blue dot Coliseum

Mesa Traditional 4x12 v30's x EVM 12l's


THE SEVEN STRING LEGION
#11
Great information and review.

Quote by Cathbard
Hemp cones? Now you're not talking about loading the cone in the bong before you walk on stage are ya?
I wonder if Kyuss used hemp cones in their cabs. And if not, why not?


You can't get high on industrial hemp.
#12
Quote by Holy-Diver
anyone know if evm 12l is good for metal?


I'd say so, BLS uses 'em.

expensive as fvck tho... for that price I'd rather own a Gold, but that's me.
#13
I say Grisky old chap...

why no reserve spots for reviews of the different speakers?

Just as great would be if there were a "recommended for" comment... like great for metal, not so for cleans etc..

I was thinking of getting a 212 or a 412 and loading it half with ceramic and half with alnico... any experience with that anyone?
Quote by Blompcube
it's so cool to hate Gibson, even the federal Department of Justice hates them.

( )( )
( . .) This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny into your
C('')('') signature to help him gain world domination.
#14
hmmm... the reserve spots to review certain speakers' properties would've been a great idea. I dropped the ball on that one.

as far as recommendations go though... there really isn't a "great for metal" or "great for cleans" per se. it's really all about the response of the speakers. what one person deems good for metal might also be a country picker's cup 'o tea.

what qualities exactly are you looking for in your future 2 or 4x12? magnets alone aren't really going to make a huge impact, but their different applications in particular speaker models will be huge. Have you looked into any specific brands or models?
#15
Celestion V30's have been the most responsive speakers I've ever played with, especially at higher volumes, honestly they've been the only speakers I've gone "whoa, these speakers are awesome" with, since the other speakers I've used have all only varied in small degrees. Do ya have any recommendations into more dynamic ones?
#16
Alnico Blue. most dynamic speaker I've ever heard.
EDIT: same thing for Celestion Golds if you want higher wattage and a smoother high end.

also, I agree that v30's are GREAT when at high volume, but at lower volume or attenuated, they lose all their magic.
Last edited by GrisKy at Nov 18, 2009,
#17
Quote by GrisKy
hmmm... the reserve spots to review certain speakers' properties would've been a great idea. I dropped the ball on that one.

as far as recommendations go though... there really isn't a "great for metal" or "great for cleans" per se. it's really all about the response of the speakers. what one person deems good for metal might also be a country picker's cup 'o tea.

what qualities exactly are you looking for in your future 2 or 4x12? magnets alone aren't really going to make a huge impact, but their different applications in particular speaker models will be huge. Have you looked into any specific brands or models?


I'm thinking of sticking with Eminence for the time being... more out of familiarity with the brand than anything else.

What qualities... essentially:
Clarity
Excellent definition for chording with distortion
A tight bass response.
Bass should be subtle and not ripping its way through my tone.
Mids and highs should be very up front and prominent
Highs should be chimey
Very good cleans... but still able to handle Arch Enemy and In Flames-eque distortion.
The speakers should be able to step out with clarity for solos

Does that help?
Quote by Blompcube
it's so cool to hate Gibson, even the federal Department of Justice hates them.

( )( )
( . .) This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny into your
C('')('') signature to help him gain world domination.
#18
RK, and you'll be using your MkV, right?

in a 4x12 slant I'd recommend x-pattering a pair of Celestion G12H's with a pair of Eminence Red Fangs or something similar.

the G12H's have an EXTREMELY tight low end, and Red Fangs have stellar harmonics with well defined breakup. 16ohm g12h's and RF's are rated at 30 and 50w respectively, so your sustained handling is going to be in the ballpark of 120w in a 4x12.

a frontloaded cab would give you those in-your-face mids, and an open back would give you those airy chimey highs, but that a rare find in a cab... you could possibly mod a removable back rearloaded cab to be frontloaded? MIGHT (maaaaybe) also have to look into adjusting the internal baffles if you go that route, and without seeing the cab, i'm not going to be able to be of much help.

EDIT: also might want to take a look at each pairs respective SPL... I don't know what they are off the top of my head.
Last edited by GrisKy at Nov 18, 2009,
#19
Quote by GrisKy
RK, and you'll be using your MkV, right?

in a 4x12 slant I'd recommend x-pattering a pair of Celestion G12H's with a pair of Eminence Red Fangs or something similar.

the G12H's have an EXTREMELY tight low end, and Red Fangs have stellar harmonics with well defined breakup. 16ohm g12h's and RF's are rated at 30 and 50w respectively, so your sustained handling is going to be in the ballpark of 120w in a 4x12.

a frontloaded cab would give you those in-your-face mids, and an open back would give you those airy chimey highs, but that a rare find in a cab... you could possibly mod a removable back rearloaded cab to be frontloaded? MIGHT (maaaaybe) also have to look into adjusting the internal baffles if you go that route, and without seeing the cab, i'm not going to be able to be of much help.

EDIT: also might want to take a look at each pairs respective SPL... I don't know what they are off the top of my head.


Yup... it'll be my Mark V... and my Krank.

When you say front loading... you are referring to cabs where the speakers are installed from the front right?

What's SPL?

OK... if I were to look at either solely Celestion or Eminence... what are my options?

Thanks dude... just trying to see what are the full range of options available. Sometimes its not always possible to get specific speakers here in Asia... so I need to check my alternatives.

Also... would you still recommend the same thing if I were install it in a 212?
Quote by Blompcube
it's so cool to hate Gibson, even the federal Department of Justice hates them.

( )( )
( . .) This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny into your
C('')('') signature to help him gain world domination.
Last edited by ragingkitty at Nov 18, 2009,
#20
Quote by ragingkitty
Yup... it'll be my Mark V... and my Krank.

When you say front loading... you are referring to cabs where the speakers are installed from the front right?

What's SPL?

OK... if I were to look at either solely Celestion or Eminence... what are my options?

Thanks dude... just trying to see what are the full range of options available. Sometimes its not always possible to get specific speakers here in Asia... so I need to check my alternatives.

Also... would you still recommend the same thing if I were install it in a 212?


yes, frontloading is just were the speakers are mounted from the front. frontloaded cabs rarely (if ever?) have open or removable backs.

Sound Pressure Level, basically amounts to loudness in db.

so, you mean like you want all celestions OR all eminence? I gotta ask why, but to answer your question as best as I can, replace the RF's with V30's... not as much high end sparkle, but the definition is still there, and it sounds like you want that more anyways by your description. if you were to go all eminence... RW&B's (kinda' like v30's with a fairly hard high-pass and very tight lows), Pvt Jack's, Legend 1258's and V128's all look like your best bets, but make sure you don't kill your lows in the process of going for more mids and extended highs. Also check into their respective handling.

With a 2x12, the real problem is making sure your sustained power handling is going to be high enough. Some speakers obviously are going to be a safer fit for a 2x12's.
#21
Quote by GrisKy
yes, frontloading is just were the speakers are mounted from the front. frontloaded cabs rarely (if ever?) have open or removable backs.

Sound Pressure Level, basically amounts to loudness in db.

so, you mean like you want all celestions OR all eminence? I gotta ask why, but to answer your question as best as I can, replace the RF's with V30's... not as much high end sparkle, but the definition is still there, and it sounds like you want that more anyways by your description. if you were to go all eminence... RW&B's (kinda' like v30's with a fairly hard high-pass and very tight lows), Pvt Jack's, Legend 1258's and V128's all look like your best bets, but make sure you don't kill your lows in the process of going for more mids and extended highs. Also check into their respective handling.

With a 2x12, the real problem is making sure your sustained power handling is going to be high enough. Some speakers obviously are going to be a safer fit for a 2x12's.


ooo ok that's quite a bit of information right there. I think that narrows it down a lot for me, so now I can go print out the spec sheets for the ones you recommended.

The reason I had to ask for alternative speakers from the same brands is because not all the speaker ranges are available. Yeah there are Cel and Emi dealers here... but they tend to stock limited ranges. So if I had alternatives, I know what I can work with. Sometimes, that's one disadvantange of living in Asia.

I get the part of killing all the lows, but what I do want to do is kinda like tighten it up. The emi V12 in my Krank work well for the tight low end... but lack life in the higher registers.

I like the sound of the Gh12s... would it work well with Celestion Golds just out of curosity?
Quote by Blompcube
it's so cool to hate Gibson, even the federal Department of Justice hates them.

( )( )
( . .) This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny into your
C('')('') signature to help him gain world domination.
#22
Very nice thread *Stickied*
Quote by Pookie6
Yngwi3, You win this whole monstrosity of a thread.

Quote by uk.mace
For the best tingle, use Original Source mint. That shit feels amazing on your balls.


Godfather of The Diezel Mafia
#23
RK, it might be best for me to answer your question about gold/g12h's with outlining a few options I've considered myself, as I'm going after similar results...

the quick answer is "yes."

a few pairings I'm leaning towards:
*gold's/mesa v30's
*g12h's/gold's
*g12h's/red fang's

I love the tighness of the g12h's... very punchy feel that's great for palm-muted attacks, but they lack a certain "sweetness" to them. Gold's are essentially the same thing as a broken in higher wattage alnico Blue... hard to get much sweeter than that. The only real difference between our needs is the strong points of our respective amps. I'm sitting on a pair of thunderclaps that can cover lead tones without much fuss, but their bread and butter is causing small earthquakes, whereas your MkV is pretty much the same thing backwards unless I'm mistaken. To play to their strengths, I need to carry that low end, but I need to do so carefully so as not to piss off my bassist. For my dual rec, I'm leaning hard toward the g12h/RF pairs... a cab that'll specialize in well defined aggressive attack. With the Diezel I was thinking of going quite a bit smoother, golds and mesa V30's (UK mesa v30's are known to have better extended highs and lows). The end result is an aggressive attack with rich and blooming harmonic content. Where I get caught up is deciding which speaker pairings would really suit which amp better, but I digress.

Thinking about pairing speakers in this way will pay off in the long run, I believe, so long as their wattages are high enough for your needs and their impedance fits your wiring scheme. where it gets a bit tricky is using the charactoristics of various speakers to develop a three dimensional sound...

now of course I say that and everyone thinks "wait, i'm playing an actual amp through real speakers in a real room... how much more 3D can I get?" what I'm getting at is that, although the speed of sound is a constant, tight bass response gives the feeling of getting to a listener first, and it's just as much a feeling in your hands as it is in your ears. It's a bit of a phenomenon of having a less muddy low end. to make a comparison, it's much like playing "chugga chugga" on an Alchemist vs. a SLO. so when you combine an extremely tight low end speaker with one known for billowing overtones, those overtones (most often in the form of high end "shimmer" or "chime", though sometimes as middy "bell-like" tones) are going to develop slightly later than the initial attack... a thing you sometimes try to avoid in the studio (SOMEtimes), but also a thing that sounds amazing in a live setting.

I hope that sheds some light, and thanks for the stick Yngwi3!
Last edited by GrisKy at Nov 19, 2009,
#24
If you still want reviews in the first posts just pm it to me and I'll edit it into mine.
WTLTL 2011
#26
Schweet... an Ohm calculator... but its parallel only?

O i've also stickied this thread as well.
Quote by Blompcube
it's so cool to hate Gibson, even the federal Department of Justice hates them.

( )( )
( . .) This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny into your
C('')('') signature to help him gain world domination.
#27
yeah, the parallel only thing kinda' pissed me off too.

I shot an e-mail to Mesa to try and get a definative answer to their relabled v30's... rumor is old ones are 70w (made in UK) and newer models are 60w. I've heard great things about the 70w version. I'll get back to you guys with what they tell me.
#28
Alright guys, I need to replace the speakers in my cab eventually.

I play a head that runs 6l6GCs, a Fender Super 60. I need something to add some more middy attack to the amp.

I'm thinking about going with some Greenback clones, or maybe some Greenbacks and GHs in an X pattern...

All of them are going to be clones (seeing as the real ones are so damn expensive )

Sound like a good idea? Or is that mix going to not be the best with an American voiced amp?
--

How do you say "I'm okay" to an answering machine?

--
#29
Does anyone know anything about the Eminence 100E speaker (8 ohm, 100w) that were used in VHT cabs? I got a VHT cab (front loaded, 1 x 12) on CL and I took out the speaker yesterday and there were no markings at all, other than 8 Ohm, 100w and a serial #.

The VHT folks told me they were a proprietary Eminence speaker, the 100E.
#30
Looks like you actually got a "Everything about XXX..." thread going here, Grisky.

Congrats.
Quote by Blompcube
it's so cool to hate Gibson, even the federal Department of Justice hates them.

( )( )
( . .) This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny into your
C('')('') signature to help him gain world domination.
#31
Quote by stratman_13
Alright guys, I need to replace the speakers in my cab eventually.

I play a head that runs 6l6GCs, a Fender Super 60. I need something to add some more middy attack to the amp.

I'm thinking about going with some Greenback clones, or maybe some Greenbacks and GHs in an X pattern...

All of them are going to be clones (seeing as the real ones are so damn expensive )

Sound like a good idea? Or is that mix going to not be the best with an American voiced amp?

I have V30s with my Bassman and it adds a nice midrange spike to it. I can get much more grunt out of the amp than with other speakers I've used with it. Its especially noticeable when I throw a boost or OD on there, the V30s add a good deal of bite. That 4x12 I just bought has Lady Lucks, which are considered pretty transparent speakers, and I definitely miss the mid punch when I run that.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#32
Quote by GrisKy
Alnico Blue. most dynamic speaker I've ever heard.
.


i'll second that. best speaker i've ever had.
Esp Eclipse II
Fender Strat LoneStar
Martin D35 Custom Shop
Vox Night Train
Vox Heritage cab 1x12
#33
See, told ya guides work well in threads like this

Quote by stratman_13
Alright guys, I need to replace the speakers in my cab eventually.

I play a head that runs 6l6GCs, a Fender Super 60. I need something to add some more middy attack to the amp.

I'm thinking about going with some Greenback clones, or maybe some Greenbacks and GHs in an X pattern...

All of them are going to be clones (seeing as the real ones are so damn expensive )

Sound like a good idea? Or is that mix going to not be the best with an American voiced amp?


Greenbacks also work well in combination with V30s. Maybe you'll enjoy running V30 clones and Greenback clones in an X pattern...
WTLTL 2011
Last edited by Mark G at Nov 20, 2009,
#34
Quote by Commodor 64
Does anyone know anything about the Eminence 100E speaker (8 ohm, 100w) that were used in VHT cabs? I got a VHT cab (front loaded, 1 x 12) on CL and I took out the speaker yesterday and there were no markings at all, other than 8 Ohm, 100w and a serial #.

The VHT folks told me they were a proprietary Eminence speaker, the 100E.


I dug through everything I've got and couldn't find reference to a 100E other than a bass speaker.

honestly, I think you're in a better position to tell us about it. so, what are your thoughts?
#35
That's the thing, GrisKy, I don't quite know how to evaluate a speaker. I'm relatively new to guitars and amps, been playing since August. I have a Blackheart Little Giant hooked up to the cab. A larger component of what I practice is blues, and I'm new to blues too, in fact.

One reason for my curiosity, is that I have a Fender SS amp too, with a Celestion G12T-100 8 ohm speaker in it. I was wondering if it would be worth it to switch out the speaker that is loaded into my VHT Cabinet, since i have no idea what it is...It has clearly been retrofitted into the cabinet, so now I'm not even sure if its the Eminence-100E.

All that said, I'm happy with the sounds that come out of the VHT. The blues musician with whom I meet up with every 2 weeks or so will likely render his opionion, and I'm going to see him tonight. So I'll let everyone know his opinion too.

I don't play out, obviously, I don't know that I ever will. I mostly practice at bedroom levels, with an occasional crank of the volume. Someday I might do some garage jamming. In any case, I'm not after huge bass sounds, in fact they rattle my walls. Would I be better served with a lower wattage speaker perhaps? Something like a Greenback ?
Last edited by Commodor 64 at Nov 21, 2009,
#36
Commodor, the G12T's a very bassy speaker (though not so much as a -75), and I doubt it's going to get you closer to the sound you're looking for.

with the little giant pushing only 5w, you're free to go low wattage, even in a 1x12. I'd recommend looking for something with a heavy magnet weight vs. cone rigidity ratio... basiclly amounts to the magnet most capable of controlling the speaker's excursion (look for a low "Xmax").

a greenback is going to be about as close to getting that great speaker break up that you'll be able to reach with the LG, but for blues, if you can get over the outrageous pricetag, I think you'd really like an alnico blue once it's broken in.
#37
OK, here is what I did. I ordered a Green Beret greenback clone from WGS. They also carry an Alnico Blue Clone, but I'm going to see how much I like the Green Beret first.
#38
So, i want to get rid of my Vintage 30's in my 2x12, and im not entirely sure what to get.

Ive been tossing up between

G12T-75's
G12H30's
Greenbacks
Eminence Wizard
Eminence Legend V128

What I want from the speakers:

Great for Blues/Classic Rock. (RHCP, and ACDC tones mostly.)
Well rounded highs. (The V30's are way to harsh)
A nice dark and smooth clean tone.

My rig will consist of Blackstar HT-5 Head and a Epi LP Custom with BareKnuckle Mules.
Greco 59-50 Mint Collection - 1982 - Iron Gear Hot Slag/Rolling Mill
Schecter Tempest Classic Goldtop
Ceriatone 18 Watt TMB/EF86 2x12 - Lorantz Greenback's
MI Audio Blues Pro Overdrive

Quote by Danyg
^ this guy defines the term "being right".
#39
Greenbacks sound like a pretty solid choice for those genres imo
Quote by Pookie6
Yngwi3, You win this whole monstrosity of a thread.

Quote by uk.mace
For the best tingle, use Original Source mint. That shit feels amazing on your balls.


Godfather of The Diezel Mafia
#40
How are Classic Lead 80's for Classic/Hard Rock?
Greco 59-50 Mint Collection - 1982 - Iron Gear Hot Slag/Rolling Mill
Schecter Tempest Classic Goldtop
Ceriatone 18 Watt TMB/EF86 2x12 - Lorantz Greenback's
MI Audio Blues Pro Overdrive

Quote by Danyg
^ this guy defines the term "being right".
Page 1 of 2