#1
I have a Ibanez s470, with a ZR tremolo bar, and as the title on this post says, when i bend any string(1/2 note or more) the pitch on every string goes down, due my tremolo bar, which is quite anoying.

Is there any way to fix it? I've tried to increase and decrease the spring tension, but it didn't help.
Last edited by Wuvahef at Nov 16, 2009,
#3
Quote by Wuvahef
I have a Ibanez s470, with a ZR tremolo bar, and as the title on this post says, when i bend any string(1/2 note or more) the pitch on every string goes down, due my tremolo bar, which is quite anoying.

Is there any way to fix it? I've tried to increase and decrease the spring tension, but it didn't help.


As far as I know, with a ZR... No. You can't add springs, and if you increas the tension, the bridge won't be set-up anymore.

Edit: You could put the Stop Bar in, but then you would loose the ability to push the bar down, you could only pull up...
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Last edited by biga29 at Nov 16, 2009,
#4
i think its unavoidable...just checked and mine does it to (floyd rose) had this guitar 6 years and ive never noticed lol...cant think of a time when it would be a problem
#5
If possible, lock the tremolo bar, otherwise, try a locking nut (it's often a problem area with things like these, it might work...)
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#7
Quote by josuetijuana
add more springs to your tremolo =]


Can't add springs to a ZR. Wouldn't work anyway.
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#8
get a tremel-no? there isnt anything you can do to fix this problem other then get one of those.best to just live with it tho unless u are purposly making the strings do that it shouldnt effect yer playing at all
#9
I also have a S470(DXQM) with The ZR and i love it , but when you play---------> 14
and things like that it doesn't sound 100% but who cares The ZR is awesome! 16B

Oh i jus tfound out me RG with Edge 3 has the same so it's a floyd thing
#10
The only way to stop that is to block the floating action of the trem because bending a note increases the tension against the springs which give a little so the other strings lower in pitch. It is a price that has to be paid to have the advantages if this type of bridge system. Most players find ways to compromise and reduce the impact of the unwanted effects.
Maybe, one day, some clever engineer with invent a way to allow bends that don;t affect other strings.
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Last edited by Lurcher at Nov 16, 2009,
#11
You can either loose the ability to dive bomb or be thankful that the effect isn't anywhere near as pronounced as it is on other trems like the Edge Pro on my RG
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#12
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
You can either loose the ability to dive bomb or be thankful that the effect isn't anywhere near as pronounced as it is on other trems like the Edge Pro on my RG


Your post just made me check my Edge Pro on my JEM.

Turns out it has the same problem

EDIT: Just realised it isnt a problem.
Last edited by Timothongz at Nov 20, 2009,
#13
You just have to bend any other notes you're playing enough to compensate too. Just don't try and play a bend and an open string at the same time
#14
Wait, do you mean only whilst you're holding the bend? If so that's normal. If the pitch of your strings stays lower after a bend though you have a problem.
Speed is a by-product of shut the fuck up.
#15
Quote by Aleksi
Wait, do you mean only whilst you're holding the bend? If so that's normal. If the pitch of your strings stays lower after a bend though you have a problem.
Its normal, but you still have to compensate for it by bending any other notes you're playing at the same time as the bend
#16
Quote by zhilla
Its normal, but you still have to compensate for it by bending any other notes you're playing at the same time as the bend

Yes, I know that, bending the string increases the tension and causes the tremolo system to dip slightly. Thus the lower pitch of all the strings (bar the one you're bending).
However, if the pitch of the strings remains lower after you've performed a bend (quite a common problem in some tremolo systems) then the tremolo system is failing to return to it's correct position. In that case you'll either need to re-set up your tremolo system, block it, get a new one or learn to live with it.

I just figured I'd check if the TS was having the latter problem.
Speed is a by-product of shut the fuck up.
#17
Quote by Aleksi
Yes, I know that, bending the string increases the tension and causes the tremolo system to dip slightly. Thus the lower pitch of all the strings (bar the one you're bending).
However, if the pitch of the strings remains lower after you've performed a bend (quite a common problem in some tremolo systems) then the tremolo system is failing to return to it's correct position. In that case you'll either need to re-set up your tremolo system, block it, get a new one or learn to live with it.

I just figured I'd check if the TS was having the latter problem.
Ah. Good point - hadn't thought of that.
#18
you can block the trem and add strings. this will make it so you can't pull back on the trem bar, though.

another option is to hold onto the trem bar when you bend a string and keep enough tension on it that the strings don't go flat.

or just mute the strings you're not playing so you don't hear them warp down.
#19
If you have a vintage style trem you can load up all the springs (think SRV - 5 massive springs pulling at max tension ;-)

If you have a floyd style or Wilkinson and DON'T want it to float (raise as well as lower pitch) you can block it so it only lowers pitch and do the same as above.

If you have a floating style trem and want to keep it floating then you have more work - you can limit the effect with heavier gauge strings and heavier springs/higher tension to compensate, but there will always be a link between the string tension and the spring tension, thus the term 'floating trem'. If you become an adavanced "floyd" style player and want to limit this effect, there is a technique using the heel of your right hand (pick hand) to intonate the strings when performing double-stop bends, but that does take some real practice to get the hang of it ;-)

If you really wanted to look around for a rare bird, there was a Fernandes Strat style guitar from the early 90's that had a Wilkinson Convertible trem. This trem is very cool because it floats like a floyd when the bar is in the up position (parallel to strings) but has a auto-lock feature when the bar is dropped, allowing double-stop bends, steel-style bends, etc. like a hard-tail bridge. These were stopped shortly after they were introduced to the US market due to a lawsuit from Gibson that claimed patent infringement on it's TransTrem patent rights. Sad thing is, the Fernandes Wilkinson Convertible was a superior trem invention for the typical player looking for the best of both the Floyd and fixed bridge guitars in one small reasonably priced trem. Good luck searching if you try to find one of these axes, kind of like hens teeth!
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