#1
I don't sing often out of pure embarrassment and lack of confidence, but once when I was jamming with my friends I started singing and they said I sounded a little like Billy Corgan from Smashing Pumpkins. Now I'm not sure if I was unconcsiously mocking him or if this is natural?

How do I know when I'm just mocking or singing?

Is it normal to have to raise your voice to reach that sound?

I honestly have no idea what range I should sing or where to start.
#2
it should just come out naturally and you shouldnt feel much strain.
youll know when youre singing in your range
#3
yeah, it should feel comfortable. if it hurts or takes a lot of effort, you're out of your range. that doesn't mean you have to avoid it, but you could hurt your vocal cords if you spend too much time in it.
#4
Billy Corgan only knows the basics of controlling his breathing as far as I can tell (and as a fan, I have watched A LOT of pumpkins videos) Other than that, he doesn't have much technique, and he had really no technique at all back in the early-to-mid 90s, so when he sang high notes (pretty much anything above a D5 for his range), he would strain his voice. This may very well be your situation as well.
Last edited by rmr024 at Nov 16, 2009,
#6
D5? Like, first string 10th fret? As in the highest note in Iron Maiden's Run to the Hills? Where does Corgan sing that? (eh.... maybe he can do it in falsetto, but that doesn't count...)

If you have to go into falsetto to reach the note, it is out of your range. You know that girly voice that guys put on if they want to sound like a singing ladybug? Or the guy from Our Lady Peace when he goes up high? That's falsetto. If you have to do that, you're out of your range. If it feels otherwise natural and comfortable (but it will still require energy!!) then you're in your natural range.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
Quote by axemanchris
D5? Like, first string 10th fret? As in the highest note in Iron Maiden's Run to the Hills? Where does Corgan sing that? (eh.... maybe he can do it in falsetto, but that doesn't count...)


CT
My bad, D4. Was thinking C5 was middle C for some reason... But yeah, he did not make a whole lot of use of his mixed voice back then, so as a result, roughly anything he sang above a D4 was more of a shout. He has gotten a lot better though over recent years.

Come to think of it, he does sing an E5 in falsetto in the song Glynis. It's pretty hilarious.
Last edited by rmr024 at Nov 19, 2009,
#8
Is their any chance if I stuck with the Pumpkins singing style I'd **** up my voice? I mean I dont sing much, but when I do jam with peeps. I'm in college now and I havnt jammed up here at all yet.
#9
I don't really know how to answer that. I'm not a "stay in your range" kind of guy. I figure, if you can make it sound good, use it. I'm a pretty deep baritone by classical standards, but most of the stuff I do is squarely in a tenor range. I'm of the opinion that if you can bridge your voice correctly, there's no reason to stick to a certain "range."
#10
The way I see it, if you can't hit the note - it's out of your range.

That said, I'm yet to find a song I can't sing, everyone is amazed at the notes I can whip out, my mate asks for tips on how to extend his range all the time and I have absolutely no idea what to say to him besides "do this", and then hit the note.

It's weird though, some songs do the same note in different ways, and it will be easier to hit in some than others, I've never really understood why.
#11
I wouldn't worry about it. Yeah, proper technique is important, and you shouldn't do stuff that'll kill your voice, but if you think too much about doing things properly with your voice, it doesn't sound free and natural like it should.
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#12
Quote by Natrone
I wouldn't worry about it. Yeah, proper technique is important, and you shouldn't do stuff that'll kill your voice, but if you think too much about doing things properly with your voice, it doesn't sound free and natural like it should.


^THIS

I think that point is criminally understated most of the time. If you can get a good sound, and you aren't killing your voice, to me, proper technique is absolutely secondary to that.