#1
So I just got over, (well am still getting over) a fairly mild case of tendinitis in the wrist but enough to put me out of playing for a while. That being said, I know that it is from playing the guitar and I know that I am undoubtedly doing something wrong. If you could please take a look at the vid and tell me what you think I would really appreciate it. Let me know if I need to shoot at a different angle or something, I always see these types of threads but no one ever actually puts the video up.

These are some things that I notice: when playing barre chords for a long period of time my wrist starts to hurt a bit. The cause of the tendinitis as far as I can tell is an exercise I was doing to help coordinate my right and left hands. It involved playing scales quickly and perfectly to a metronome. It worked great, but I believe it cause the problem because, especially up toward the third fret, when playing the first couple strings my wrist and especially the area between my pinky and wrist would be killing me.

I did a little of everything in the vid, please excuse the errors, it's been a little while

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6HrLhiMAmo
Last edited by thekidkid32 at Nov 16, 2009,
#2
I didn't notice anything really in the video, but make sure you're only exerting a MINIMAL amount of force on the strings when you fret. Most people fret with too much force and don't even realize it, so take a minute to sit down and see the minimum amount of force you can use to make the strings ring. You'll find it may be a lot less than you originally thought!
#4
looked ok nice sound. Practice your scales slower speed. What guitar you using? Other than that good job good form. You might be over doing it. If it hurts take a break dont risk it. Especially if your just getting over a injury. Take it slow. Use a metronome and stretch before playing.
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#5
Looks ok. On the scales, I notice your fingers go too far out on the thinner strings.
I got just common advise, you know... don't play too much at once, warm up properly, keep relaxed, stretch (try this everyday).
#6
When you're playing the lead stuff your thumb is waaaaaay too high on the neck; it should be in the middle of the back of the neck, roughly in line with your middle finger. The same issue applies with some of the chord stuff lower on the neck as well. If you can sort that out I think the rest of your technique should clean up pretty quickly as long as you make sure you're relaxed and the power for fretting the notes comes from your fingers rather than your palm or wrist.
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#7
Hey dude, I put a comment on your video, but I might as well re-state it here.

The thing you're doing wrong is with your thumb being so high- this actually puts your hand/wrist in an odd position where your fingers are pushing down against the palm of your hand. Think about it: when you grip something, you use your thumb and fingers- not your fingers and th palm of your hand.

Using the palm like this, as you have found out, actually just places pressure (and strain) on the wrist when it should be against the thumb.

Place your thumb behind the neck, under your fingers for support.
#8
Thanks a lot for all the comments guys! Glad to hear you like the sound, I haven't shared my new guitar to many people so I like to hear that. I'm also glad to hear that my form isn't all that bad, especially on the barre chords, but I now see how my thumb is indeed way to far up and should be pressed against the neck when playing most stuff like leads.

It's going to be difficult though, that's a pretty hard habit to stop! After messing around with it I can definitely see how it feels better and it actually straightens out my fingers, making it easier to reach. I definitely have some work to do though. I really appreciate the advice guys
#9
Quote by thekidkid32
Thanks a lot for all the comments guys! Glad to hear you like the sound, I haven't shared my new guitar to many people so I like to hear that. I'm also glad to hear that my form isn't all that bad, especially on the barre chords, but I now see how my thumb is indeed way to far up and should be pressed against the neck when playing most stuff like leads.

It's going to be difficult though, that's a pretty hard habit to stop! After messing around with it I can definitely see how it feels better and it actually straightens out my fingers, making it easier to reach. I definitely have some work to do though. I really appreciate the advice guys


S'alright dude, the key thing is that when you're playing now you keep an eye on your technique and make sure you correct yourself if you see it going wrong. It'll become habit soon enough
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#10
After watching many videos and trying to figure out exactly how to get that done, I've noticed that everyone I watched has their thumb over the board a little. I have absolutely no control when I try to keep my thumb pressed on the back of the neck. Is it just that my thumb was TOO far over the neck and need to bring it back a bit? I see mine is a bit higher than most, but I haven't seen anyone really solo or anything without their thumb over a little. It just seems like you'd have so much more control with your thumb over a bit?
#11
I have absolutely no control when I try to keep my thumb pressed on the back of the neck.


That's because you're not used to it and your technique is a bit sloppy to begin with. Thumb over the neck really only enhances your control on vibrato and bends, it will actually limit your range of motion on everything else.
#12
Thumb position depends on a lot of things, like guitar angle, which string you're on, and which fret you're on.
Just try a lot of things, see what works and is the most comfortable for you. For example, the thumb will naturally be over the neck quite a bit when playing the 18th position on the thinnest 2 strings, but it will be near the middle a lot more when you play the thicker strings down at the other end. All I can say is try a lot of positions, and see what's the most comfortable, most relaxed, and easiest to reach and fret with.
#13
I wrecked my left hand index finger likely permanently during my learning phase - tingling and numb feeling if over used for more than a year now

My likely culprit was my index laying flat on barre chords instead of using the side of the finger putting much less force on the tendons. that and I'm a programmer so I type alot. I saw your index doing that a little so be wary of that and stop if it starts to feel weird. I def wish I had of
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