#1
I currently have a set of evolutions i my Ibanez s2170fb and while they have a good modern smooth tone, I am trying to achieve more of an 80s grit out of my bridge pickup.

Im sure you all know the 80s metal/shred tone: high gain an more on the thin side. I am really leaning towards the dimarzio super distortion, or possibly the tone zone. I am a big fan of paul gilberts tone during his stint with Mr. Big if that helps. On the Dimarzio website it says that he played with super distortions wired in parallel, so how does that affect the tone as opposed to series?

Any other suggestions are appreciated, as well as info on these 2.

And i'm going to give a shout out to seagull right now, because I know he wouldn't be caught dead missing out on a thread where pickups are being discussed.

edit: playin through ma JSX btw
Gibson SG Standard
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Last edited by sacamano79 at Nov 17, 2009,
#2
I wouldn't call 80's metal thin sounding, but then it depends what tone you're trying to achieve. If its Gilbert then yea he is more on the thin side
I'd check out a Super Distortion or a JB. I know a lot of people recommend a JB for that 80's sound, its almost a generic answer but it is true. Was used a lot back then. JCM 800 + TS-9 + JB = 80's metal
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#3
hmm i would list some bands you like other wise people are gonna be spamming EMGs at you
#4
the dimarzio super distortion would be good
also check out dimarzio paf pro since Paul also used that
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#5
Good call on the JCM800, I was thinking about saving enough money to sell my JSX and have enough to buy one, but that could be a while and the JSX does a good job.

Can anyone tell me what parallel wiring does tonally? I am under the impression that it gives a more thin sound.
Gibson SG Standard
Ibanez S2170FB
Peavey JSX
Marshall 1960A
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#6
check this out. it gives some good explanations of wiring schemes and things. parallel is just under the 2nd drawing down.

http://www.sixstringzone.com/products-reviews/seymourduncan/SD-Humbucker-Wiring.pdf
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#7
Wired in parallel means the coils are split so they don't work together like a regular humbucker. They're both on so they cancel hum. It's like a strat in positions 2 or 4. But since the coils are so close together on humbuckers, it doesn't really sound like single coils. It also reduces the output, makes it a little thinner, and gives it a sharper attack.

But I always thought he mainly used PAF Pros and basswood guitars for Mr. Big. He also played British Amps. I would look into the Fred since it's like a PAF Pro with a higher midrange. That might offset the lower midrange of the mahogany in your S. On the other hand, Super Distortions were one of the most popular pickups in the 80s so you might want those if you want something other than PG tones. Tone Zone and Norton are also good depending on who you're going for. The PAF Pro and Fred do sound thinner than the others though, so it may not be what you're looking for. I personally wouldn't match them with a JSX for 80s metal tone.

http://www.ibanez.co.jp/PGM20/list.html
Last edited by JELIFISH19 at Nov 17, 2009,
#8
PAF Pro or Super Distortion.

Find out who used what then get listening to some albums.
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#9
You're going to want a compressed and mid heavy pickup for '80's metal tone.


You can go the tried and tested route via Dimarzio Super Distortions. The Bare Knuckle VHII might be worth looking into.
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#10
Try the Duncan Distortion humbuckers. They are perfect for what you want to do.
#11
If you're talking brash, in-your-face, big haired flashy guitar playing then the Tone Zone fits the bill perfectly. It doesn't do subtle and it doesn't do cleans but it excels at showing off. If you want something a little more versatile and a little less full-on then the Norton is probably the way to go.
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#12
Bill Lawrence L500 (now Wilde Pickups). The original is still available or there is the 500XL which is a little hotter.
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#13
The Dimarzio tone zone or the Super Distortion suit the the bill fine.
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#14
the pair of d activators in my ibanez do 80s metal wonderfully. im not sure if they are a bit shrill on the high end or if its my amp (crate) as ive recently discovered i have to be careful with the treble settings @ loud volumes.

also, maybe the SD dimebucker? dont know what to tell you for the neck though

how do you like that JSX? any big complaints?


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#15
Quote by SYLrules88

how do you like that JSX? any big complaints?


At first I was not thrilled with the tone, but after changing the original el34s to kt77s, it is amazing. It also took a while to get good at working the active EQ.
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#16
I say give Seymour Duncans a shot. I put those in a 320DXQM and it was just so raw and gritty when it came to cutting through.
#17
Quote by JELIFISH19
Wired in parallel means the coils are split so they don't work together like a regular humbucker. They're both on so they cancel hum. It's like a strat in positions 2 or 4. But since the coils are so close together on humbuckers, it doesn't really sound like single coils. It also reduces the output, makes it a little thinner, and gives it a sharper attack.
Wired in parallel means the coils (or the pickups themselves) are... wired in parallel are opposed to series, they're not split.
#18
Quote by al112987
Wired in parallel means the coils (or the pickups themselves) are... wired in parallel are opposed to series, they're not split.

Yea, I was trying to explain what it really does to the TS. The coils work individually but at the same time. But with series, they work together doing the same thing. You can think about it in terms of two woodcutters (coils). In parallel, they both cut trees individually. They're always cutting different trees so they're limited to what they can do individually. But with series, they work together to cut a single tree. This way, their combined strength allows them to cut trees faster and it increases their efficiency. I didn't mean split as a coil-split, i meant they're separated to work individually.
#19
It's the other way round actually.

Series is the equivalent of two woodcutters cutting two separate trees.
Parallel is the equivalent of two woodcutters cuting down the same tree at the same time.

Parallel takes less effort, but the net result is less wood.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Nov 18, 2009,