#1
I have been playing about 8 years on guitar and have spent a great deal of time on technique the ability to play "flashy" guitar solos well (for my own enjoyment). Up until 2 months, I have had not really sat down for a long period of time and done performed a focused, technique practice regimen for longer than 2 weeks.

So I decided to give technique one last shot and formed a practice regimen where I Work on alternate picking/legato/sweeping for about an average of 1-2 hours a day in addition to learning the colors album by between the buried and me.

I KNOW how to practice (been doing it for 16 years on several instruments)

I am just noticing that although my technique has improved a little, I feel as if it should have improved more, considering I have put forth about 1-2 hours of focused technique practice over the past 2 months My sweep picking has not improved at all.

Also, I am still working on between the buried and me's colors album (have been for about a year), and can play it 90% correctly through the first 4 songs at full speed, but still have trouble with certain sections, even after practicing them relentlessly for the past year.

Anyways, my main point is that I feel I should spend a lot less time no technique and alot more time on improvisation and songwriting, mainly because I feel like I do not have a knack for guitar technique like most people do.....

MY question is...should I stick with spending half my time improving technique and stick with it or spend alot less time on this and devote more time to other areas of guitar. Part of me says yes, but the other part says I am giving up on it.
Current Gear

Bogner Uberschall
Mesa Dual Rectifier (Old Version)
Orange Closed Back 2x12 Cab with V30's
PRS Custom 24 Top 10 with 57/08 pickups
Schecter Hellraiser
Breedlove Atlas AD20
A bunch of pedals
#2
I'm of the opinion that there's an order to things.

1. Learn to create well and sound good.
2. Learn to be fast.
3. Learn to create well and sound good utilizing speed.

I'm sure someone will disagree...

And did you say you practiced for 2 hours over 2 months and were worried why you weren't getting better?

Edit: Oh wait I get it now.
The UG Awards exist only to instill me with existential doubt.


For me, the 60's ended that day in 1978...

Willies. Fuck the lick and fuck you too.
Last edited by TheBurningFish at Nov 17, 2009,
#3
The end result of practice is to be able to make music. If for any reason you are being made unable to do so by your practice, then something needs to change. I don't think that abandoning the technical side all together is a wise choice, it is an essential component of the musical making machine, but if you are having trouble in any of your musical aspirations it could very well be that certain aspects of your musical schema overall have been eschewed and out of balance.

There is no hard and fast rule that one must spend x and x amount of time practicing this and that. If you feel that to improve as musician you need to devote more time else where, and less in another area, than by all means, shoot. Practice the other aspects. You may find that when you come back to what you were doing before you will have gotten better without necessarily 'trying' at it.
#4
Quote by psychosylocibin
I have been playing about 8 years on guitar and have spent a great deal of time on technique the ability to play "flashy" guitar solos well (for my own enjoyment). Up until 2 months, I have had not really sat down for a long period of time and done performed a focused, technique practice regimen for longer than 2 weeks.

So I decided to give technique one last shot and formed a practice regimen where I Work on alternate picking/legato/sweeping for about an average of 1-2 hours a day in addition to learning the colors album by between the buried and me.

I KNOW how to practice (been doing it for 16 years on several instruments)

I am just noticing that although my technique has improved a little, I feel as if it should have improved more, considering I have put forth about 1-2 hours of focused technique practice over the past 2 months My sweep picking has not improved at all.

Also, I am still working on between the buried and me's colors album (have been for about a year), and can play it 90% correctly through the first 4 songs at full speed, but still have trouble with certain sections, even after practicing them relentlessly for the past year.

Anyways, my main point is that I feel I should spend a lot less time no technique and alot more time on improvisation and songwriting, mainly because I feel like I do not have a knack for guitar technique like most people do.....

MY question is...should I stick with spending half my time improving technique and stick with it or spend alot less time on this and devote more time to other areas of guitar. Part of me says yes, but the other part says I am giving up on it.


Just focus on music and allow yourself to develop the necessary techniques through experience.


If you come across a piece of music that you lack the technique to play..... take some time out and focus on that technique. Then apply it in the context of the music.


Quote by Erc
The end result of practice is to be able to make music. If for any reason you are being made unable to do so by your practice, then something needs to change. I don't think that abandoning the technical side all together is a wise choice, it is an essential component of the musical making machine, but if you are having trouble in any of your musical aspirations it could very well be that certain aspects of your musical schema overall have been eschewed and out of balance.

There is no hard and fast rule that one must spend x and x amount of time practicing this and that. If you feel that to improve as musician you need to devote more time else where, and less in another area, than by all means, shoot. Practice the other aspects. You may find that when you come back to what you were doing before you will have gotten better without necessarily 'trying' at it.


This is good advice.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Nov 17, 2009,
#5
Quote by TheBurningFish
I'm of the opinion that there's an order to things.

1. Learn to create well and sound good.
2. Learn to be fast.
3. Learn to create well and sound good utilizing speed.

I'm sure someone will disagree...

And did you say you practiced for 2 hours over 2 months and were worried why you weren't getting better?

Edit: Oh wait I get it now.



I am definitely at the third step right now. I am beginning to write material which incorporates more difficult technical passages, this is part of the reason why I have decided to dedicate more time to technical work.

The last thing I Want to do is to write a section that sounds great but is technically demanding and I am unable to play it comfortably and freely without choking. I do not want technicalities to be limiting factor in my songwriting (The difficult passage I write are not THAT difficult IMO - no six string sweeping at 200 bpm ). '

Its like how I Wrote this four string sweeping section in a song about 3 months ago, but have not been able to get four string + sweeping down at all at a level where I Can play it live and be comfortable. This is very frustrating, as it is an example of how technicalities are the limiting factor, not one's songwriting ability or another factor. Technique playing IMO is just an "empty vessel" to expressing your songwriting, and is not the ends to any degree. When this limits your the ends (your expression of music and songwriting), it is very frustrating.

I guess the only thing I could do right now is either right less "difficult" parts or approach technique from a different angle - maybe I have been doing it wrong since day 1. Any suggestions would be helpful.
Current Gear

Bogner Uberschall
Mesa Dual Rectifier (Old Version)
Orange Closed Back 2x12 Cab with V30's
PRS Custom 24 Top 10 with 57/08 pickups
Schecter Hellraiser
Breedlove Atlas AD20
A bunch of pedals