#1
Piano riff I wrote a while back!

Let me know what you think, Its very simple...I want to put it somewhere but I do not know where it would fit (maybe some kind of interlude).

I like the chords I used to transition to the next key in measure 9 (not sure what they are, theory-wise, but they sound cool).
Attachments:
riff 3.gp5
Current Gear

Bogner Uberschall
Mesa Dual Rectifier (Old Version)
Orange Closed Back 2x12 Cab with V30's
PRS Custom 24 Top 10 with 57/08 pickups
Schecter Hellraiser
Breedlove Atlas AD20
A bunch of pedals
#2
Haha. I read "simple" and was like, "great, some idiot just wrote a two finger one hand piano part," and then it was actually pretty sweet.
Is the word for when the bass notes descend chromatically with each chord and proper method for it? I've always wanted to figure out how to make that sound good. I guess I'll take that to the theory forums.
But, anyways. Yes, use this. Don't know what kind of music you write, but this could really be used as an interlude for any kind of song. Even like, deathcore could use something like this really.
#3
Right now, what you have there is part of a diminished chord - or at least that´s what the ear perceives it as. What kind of diminished (diminished triad, half-diminished seventh or diminished seventh) we can´t judge since it´s just two tones but I´d flesh it out a bit, most likely to a diminished 7th chord or a diminished triad.

The beauty of diminished seventh chord is that enharmonically, there is only three of them. Of course, you can construct one on whatever note you want - a gississ if you feel like it, and technically, without temperament it would actually sound a bit different. Anyway, enough technicality - the point is, they essentially stretch over keys - for example, C#dim, with the notes of C#, E, G, Bb (in this case belonging to d minor), and A#dim - A#, C#, E, G (belonging to b minor), are enharmonic (they sound the same). This allows us to, as in this case, slip over from D minor to B minor quite effortlessly, since the C#dim/A#dim collapses beautifully to the F#, B minors dominant and voila we´re in B minor. An A#dim could also be used to resolve directly to B minor, however this is usually harder to pull off nicely.

Another option would be to make it a diminished triad (m-5), which also is quite interesting. Let´s say we build a diminished triad on C#, consisting of C#, E, G. In the key of D minor, these would feel like an A7 with omitted root - not overly common - the point, however, is that it would function as a dominant. It brings us back to D minor. In B minor however, the exact same notes - C#, E, G would function like a pre-dominant chord (don´t know the english word, sorry), their usual function. It leads us to F# (or F#7), which in turn brings us back to B minor. Again, since the chord is ambiguous it makes for a very fluent transition.

The "harmonic pull" of the diminished triad isn´t the strongest though, which is why it is common practice to use the half-diminished chord (m7-5) for stronger resolve, however in this case this would probably feel a bit blunt as we would go out-of-key with the 7th.


Anyway, attaching a GP with examples of all the stuff I was talking about. Sorry for the random write-up I just started trying to explain things simply and yeah look where that got me.
Attachments:
examples.gp5
#4
Haha wow I was not expecting that lengthy of an analysis....

Sounds like it is a Diminished Triad..from the examples you gave me that was the most pleasing transition.....

I'm not a theory guru at all, If it sounds cool, I write it and keep it. But it is interesting to figure out why certain progressions work.
Current Gear

Bogner Uberschall
Mesa Dual Rectifier (Old Version)
Orange Closed Back 2x12 Cab with V30's
PRS Custom 24 Top 10 with 57/08 pickups
Schecter Hellraiser
Breedlove Atlas AD20
A bunch of pedals