#1
I was looking over the chords in my jazz band music, and I came across this one:

Eb2

I'm not quite sure what it means... sus chords are usually written out (Ebsus2). Is this chord the same thing? Or something different?
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#2
From what I've gathered looking at my praise band music, it means add9.

It really bothers me.
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#5
Oh, okay...that makes sense.

Thanks guys.
My Gear
Ibanez RGR421EXFM
Schecter Hellraiser C-1 FR
Roland Cube 30X



Female guitarist. Get it right.
#6
no its just a short way for sus2 chords at least thats what they teach me in school
#7
Quote by Funkicker
no its just a short way for sus2 chords at least thats what they teach me in school
Everywhere I've seen, it's been referring to add9. I've never seen it referring to a sus2.

Either way, simply "2" is not a correct nomenclature for either type of chord, as it is not specific enough.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#8
yeah it would be an add 9

for an add9 you would need to include the 1st the 3rd the 5th and the new note which is the 2 but can be expressed as a 9 in this case.
simply if you just add a note to the normal 1 3 5 if the root not is E you say Eadd9 or Eadd11 or Eadd13

sus chords would replace the third with the 4th or the second
Last edited by metaladdict123 at Nov 20, 2009,
#9
technically it should be an add 2nd but if you are playing the chord on guitar this isnt really an option so its usually played as an add 9th
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#10
Quote by food1010
Everywhere I've seen, it's been referring to add9. I've never seen it referring to a sus2.

you have, band in a box is a widely known example, type E2 of F2 or anything and you wont hear a third, that makes it suspended
also i believe i saw some sus chords written as just #2 in a real book not sure though

but have a listen at the tune sus chords are very easy to hear, so maybe you do hear third and im wrong
#11
big band charts (for guitar) generally suck. listen to figure out which one it is because it could be either and sometimes publishers will use different chord names/symbols in different pieces. They usually have lots of uneccesary chords (used to facilitate good voice leading) that could be avoided with simple standard notation and intuition. In a situation like that, ask your band director about what to play, as he or she will be able to look at the score and see whats going on in the arrangement which the internet cannot do, and there is no real consensous on chord terminology (beyond the basics of 7th chords and stuff, but sometimes a +9 on a chart means augmented, other times a +9 on a chart means to add the ninth). Also, ask your band director for a copy of the piano chart, which you should keep on your stand for what chords to play (as they usually make more sense) and to see what the piano is doing and use your guitar chart for when you have to play a single note line or when the piano is resting. Im in a college jazz band right now (a mid-low level one) and for alot of charts there isnt a guitar part, just a piano part which is often much better to read off of.