#1
I've surfed the forums here, and actually, I asked my college band professor, but I can't seem to put a name on this scale. It only has seven notes, similar to a blues scale, but it's slightly different.

The basic format is as follows:
R 2 b3 4 5 b7 R
for example:
Bb C Db Eb F Ab Bb

Now, at first glance it looks like a Dorian, but missing a note, but I was wondering if there was a better way to classify it.
#3
Quote by Cyberbob
Surely it's just the natural minor missing the m6th?
This. I can't imagine omitting a note could make it a whole different scale unless you omitted two to make it a pentatonic. Even with pentatonics, they're based off of diatonic scales.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#4
Quote by food1010
This. I can't imagine omitting a note could make it a whole different scale unless you omitted two to make it a pentatonic. Even with pentatonics, they're based off of diatonic scales.



+1 Go to http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/reverse_scales.php
Type in your notes on the fretboard and you can find the scale, If it is not a scale you just add or subtract a different note and it will tell you what scale you have got..
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#5
That is a sweet site.

For those curious, this scale came up because that's the set of notes I use (in various keys) when soloing or just doodling on my guitar.

It appears to just be a natural minor, or a dorian, although I never use the Gb required for both of those scales.

I guess there's nothing special to clasify it with, but I thought i'd check.
#6
Glad you found your scale. The site is great and very easy to navigate and alot of info.
My Gear
Fender Strat ('97American Lonestar HSS)
Ibanez RGTHRG1
B-52 AT100
Marshall1960A Cab
Marshall 1960B Cab
#8
Quote by ndstumme
That is a sweet site.

For those curious, this scale came up because that's the set of notes I use (in various keys) when soloing or just doodling on my guitar.

It appears to just be a natural minor, or a dorian, although I never use the Gb required for both of those scales.

I guess there's nothing special to clasify it with, but I thought i'd check.


It's not dorian.
#9
Quote by isaac_bandits
It's not dorian.


Sorry, my bad. I need a regular G for the Ab dorian, not a Gb.
#10
Quote by ndstumme
Sorry, my bad. I need a regular G for the Ab dorian, not a Gb.


You would need a G♭ for natural minor.
You would need a G♮ for dorian. However, the dorian colour tone is the ♮ so when you omit that note, unless there is any reason based on the harmony to believe the song is dorian (I highly doubt there is) then it is just natural minor, and you happen not to play the six.
#11
That's just natural minor. Not playing the 6th doesn't change the scale at all. As isaac said, unless you have an extremely strong reason to believe otherwise, this is not going to be Dorian. The nat 6 is necessary to establish it as Dorian, so unless you have a nat 6 in your harmony, it's natural minor.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#12
It's actually a hexatonic scale as it is written, because it has six notes. You are all inferring that he wrote the natural minor or dorian scale, but it's obviously not because you can't tell which scale it is.
#13
Quote by st.stephen
It's actually a hexatonic scale as it is written, because it has six notes. You are all inferring that he wrote the natural minor or dorian scale, but it's obviously not because you can't tell which scale it is.


But it is the natural minor with the sixth omitted. There is no commonly accepted name for it. Sure a six note scale is called hexatonic, but this isn't a commonly used hexatonic scale.
#14
Quote by isaac_bandits
But it is the natural minor with the sixth omitted. There is no commonly accepted name for it. Sure a six note scale is called hexatonic, but this isn't a commonly used hexatonic scale.

I must admit, I was being a little facetious don't get me wrong, I do recognize it as a natural minor with omitted sixth, but why stick to the old tried and true path?
#15
So how come pentatonic scales are considered different but hexatonic not? One note just too little a difference to bother giving it a seperate name?
#16
Quote by Beserker
So how come pentatonic scales are considered different but hexatonic not? One note just too little a difference to bother giving it a seperate name?
Pentatonics aren't just any old 5 note scale though - they are derived by omitting the half steps from 7 note scales...I think
#17
Quote by zhilla
Pentatonics aren't just any old 5 note scale though - they are derived by omitting the half steps from 7 note scales...I think

Not sure about that...I think you would call any five note scale a pentatonic, what else if not? I remember a Guthrie Govan lesson from Guitar Techniques where he called this scale the 'Indian Pentatonic' - 1 3 4 5 b7 (really nice scale btw) and it doesn't seem to have been created by removing half steps... but regardless my question still stands, even if it's kind of a silly question
#18
Quote by Beserker
So how come pentatonic scales are considered different but hexatonic not? One note just too little a difference to bother giving it a seperate name?


The whole tone scale is a hexatonic scale with its own name. So is the blues scale. So are the two modes of the augmented scale.

The reason why people talk about the minor pentatonic, and not 'minor hexatonic' (as I will call the natural minor with the omitted sixth), is because the minor pentatonic is a very commonly used scale while the minor hexatonic is not. This is due to the pentatonic containing only the "safe" notes, so that any of the notes can be used over a minor chord progression and won't sound too dissonant, which makes improvising easier.

Quote by zhilla
Pentatonics aren't just any old 5 note scale though - they are derived by omitting the half steps from 7 note scales...I think


A pentatonic scale is any five note scale. However, only the minor and major pentatonics are commonly used.
#19
The major and minor pentatonic "real" names are anhemi pentatonic scales (anhemi meaning no semitones). There are plenty of pentatonic scales out there though, it's pretty insane.

A really cool one I've been infatuated with lately is what the Japanese call the yo scale, written like this: 1 2 4 5 6. It may look like the fourth mode of the major pentatonic scale, but this is the foundation for traditional Japanese music (and Asian music as well, so I'm told). The Japanese also employ another pentatonic with semitones (1 b2 4 5 b6) they call the In scale, play it in any key and I guarantee you will recognize it.

Anyway, sorry to drive the thread away from the original topic, thought you guys might like to check this stuff out, I find it all very cool.
#20
If your using it in blues, I would actual assume its just a minor pentatonic but sometimes you play the 9th. The 9th sounds great over the I chord in a blues, so I could see that note being associated with the scale.
#21
I think it all depends on context.

If you are a self tought "Rock" guitar player it is a minor pentatonic scale with a majro 2nd in it.

If you know a little bit of theory it is a natural minor scale and you dont play the 6th.

If you know a little bit more about theory you know that a scale with 6 notes could be called hexatonic.

If you know even more about theory these notes could be dreived from a set of pitches, a matrix, or even random chance.

Is it a mode or not? It is surely a minor mode, but that is as specific as you could be.

I guess it all just comes down to you liking how it sounds.