#1
My local Guitar Center (which is still 2 hours away) has had one on the floor for a while now, I hadn't given it much thought until I started digging around YouTube and researching the amp a little bit. I plan on visiting GC on Thanksgiving Weekend, and if its still there I'm going to see if they'll let me try it. Until then I've got a couple questions for anybody who has owned or played one.

-They claim the amp has a "tri-mode rectifier", seems they are trying to copy a Mesa, does it come close? I like to play "traditional" metal I guess you'd call it, stuff like Metallica & Megadeth. Some high gain amps (like a 6505) sound a little to harsh for my tastes, I like a big, thick, growling overdrive sound, kind of a Black Album-ish tone, I suppose.

-How do they hold up? I read a few reviews of the AT combo that claimed reliability is sketchy. I wouldn't be gigging with it, it would just stay put in my living room.

Last edited by KAS1981 at Nov 18, 2009,
#2
They don't really sound like a mesa, but they aren't harsh either, at least not with a decent cab.
Reliability is an issue with these amps, they are just not particularly well built. Whether or not you want to take the chance is up to you. If you're not going to be pushing it too hard with gigging and it's got a warranty, it shouldn't be too much of an issue.
#3
Quote by Roc8995
They don't really sound like a mesa, but they aren't harsh either, at least not with a decent cab.
Reliability is an issue with these amps, they are just not particularly well built. Whether or not you want to take the chance is up to you. If you're not going to be pushing it too hard with gigging and it's got a warranty, it shouldn't be too much of an issue.


Colin is right, they aren't really like a Mesa. There is sort of a similarity, but you are really better off regarding it as a B-52. I've owned one and it isn't like a Mesa enough to warranty a real comparison.

I can also vouch for the not well built part. I've owned two B-52s and both broke down. Minor issues...but still not something you want to deal with. You'll definitely want a nice warranty.
WTLTL 2011
#4
I just sold my B-52. Great sounding amp for the money Never had any problems with mine. But there have been problems with some models over-heating.
#5
im on my second b-52 amp and i really cant complain.They get really hot tho,and ive noticed if you have it on a/b and not A it doesn't get as hot. also can buy a fan for 25 bucks from b-52. its an easy install.

i think why they get such a bad wrap is because a lot of people hear its the poor mans mesa. any body starting out finds there self at GC and the sales men pitch "the poor mans mesa" crap and they buy it because its nowhere near the price of a mesa, and they think its just as good as a mesa (which its not) so the noobs have problems with tubes and ect.. and it gets a bad wrap, thats my 2 cents...
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Ibanez RG1527M Prestige
Martin DX1
Agile-2000
#6
The amp sounds great! Alot of versatility and amazing cleans with it. Poor mans mesa is not a good statement, it doesnt sound like it, mesas dont have a nice clean, But Mesa is that expensive for a reason, But the B-52 is great in its own right. Take you guitar to GC and play through it like you would in your house.

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#7
I've played the 100w head and was quite fond of it (especially for the money). I think most of the issues early on were with the combo's overheating. I doubt you'll have that problem.

The only thing that stumped me was that I could not tell the difference between OD1 and OD2 but it has a nice clean channel so it was really moot.

Also, you don't need to 'ask' GC if you can play it. Tell them what you want to do. What I'd do is call in advance, ask for someone in 'Amps dept', and ask them nicely if they'll put it in the loud room for you with the stock cab and maybe another better cab. Bring your guitar if you can and go as early in the day as possible.

I've had good success doing this.
#9
I just want to clear something up. All amps have rectifiers. They can be solid-state or tube. They effect the attack of the strings and the feeling of the amp. The Mesa/Boogie amp's name isn't based on the rectifier in amps. It's based on the verb "to rectify." People think that it's meant to sound like a Rectifier or compete with it because it boasts a tri-mode rectifier as one of it's key features, but that in no way means it's related to the Mesa/Boogie in any way. It sounds more like a Peavey 6505 or 5150 to me.
Last edited by JELIFISH19 at Nov 19, 2009,
#10
Quote by JELIFISH19
I just want to clear something up. All amps have rectifiers. They can be solid-state or tube. They effect the attack of the strings and the feeling of the amp. The Mesa/Boogie amp's name isn't based on the rectifier in amps. It's based on the verb "to rectify." People think that it's meant to sound like a Rectifier or compete with it because it boasts a tri-mode rectifier as one of it's key features, but that in no way means it's related to the Mesa/Boogie in any way. It sounds more like a Peavey 6505 or 5150 to me.


I absolutely did not know that. I thought it was because of the tri-mode rectifier, as you mentioned, in these Mesa's was the reason they named it the Rectifier.
#11
Dual Rectifiers are named after their 2 modes of rectification, SS or tube. Single recs have only one, SS. Triple Recs still only have 2, but the "Triple" is just to show that it's got 3 times the power as the single. It's a misnomer, but works for marketing.
#12
b52s honestly i wouldnt get one, they produce good enough tones, still a tad thin for my tastes, most likely fixed with a good tube swap. we sold them for 2 months and in that time we had one amp come with blown tubes, one that came back in a week because the board fried and 1 where the power supply was non existant, so we stopped doing buisness with them, and i really wouldnt trust a floor model if its been there awhile, they arent made for longevity.
my gear//
GUITARS
ESP Horizon Custom
ESP M202BB
ESP HB300
Gibson LP Custom
Gibson V
AMPS
Orange Rockverb 50
Mesa Triple Recti
Marshall JCM800 2210
#14
^^^^ the guitar shop i work at, non existant power supply means we had the power cable but nothing to plug the cable into, there was no way to power the amp, it was on one of the solid state models
my gear//
GUITARS
ESP Horizon Custom
ESP M202BB
ESP HB300
Gibson LP Custom
Gibson V
AMPS
Orange Rockverb 50
Mesa Triple Recti
Marshall JCM800 2210
#15
Quote by cutslikedrugsx
Dual Rectifiers are named after their 2 modes of rectification, SS or tube. Single recs have only one, SS. Triple Recs still only have 2, but the "Triple" is just to show that it's got 3 times the power as the single. It's a misnomer, but works for marketing.

Erm...the dual/triple signifier represents the number of rectifier tubes, one per pair of power tubes. Not a misnomer at all. The single doesn't have a rectifier tube, but I guess it's technically got one rectifier.
#16
Quote by dertjoe
^^^^ the guitar shop i work at, non existant power supply means we had the power cable but nothing to plug the cable into, there was no way to power the amp, it was on one of the solid state models



OK. Just checking. In this thread we are talking about the AT (All Tube) B52 amp so when you said it had no power supply I was like


To have an amp period without a way to plug it in is complete :wtf

Do you have any better evidence?

Did you guys try to rectify things (verb) with teh B52?


TS - Listen to Roc please................
Last edited by 311ZOSOVHJH at Nov 20, 2009,
#17
Quote by Roc8995
Erm...the dual/triple signifier represents the number of rectifier tubes, one per pair of power tubes. Not a misnomer at all. The single doesn't have a rectifier tube, but I guess it's technically got one rectifier.


I've always heard that the reasoning behind the dual rectifier name was that it was switchable between tube and ss rectifiers, not that it had a rectifier tube for each pair of power tubes.
#18
Well, the dual rectifier has two rectifier tubes, and the triple rectifier has three rectifier tubes. I could be wrong but that just makes more sense to me, especially considering that some early fender amps with two rectifier tubes were called double or dual rectifier amps, and Randall Smith probably knew about that and used that nomenclature.
#20
Not trying to hijack the thread.. but just wandering has anyone ever had experience with playing less heavy stuff on one of these like older punk(sex pistols)? Does it do well for anything other than metal?