#1
ive been told by my vocal instructor who knows a lot about metal that it is difficult for a bass to do metalcore in the key of c... like drop c melodic metalcore type stuff like bullet for my valentine and killswitch engage (i know that more than half of you dislike those bands)

she said that i would be better down tuning even lower...is this true?/ any advice for a bass vocalist singing in that key?
#2
What? How could that possibly be any harder than any other key?
#3
Tuning doesn't define the key, and your vocal range don't determine your instrument range.
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#4
Seems like you don't want to believe it. I'd ask the professional (your instructor) for more information.
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#5
she said g or a would be better because i can sing an octave like from one A to another A and some notes below the lower A and some above the higher one.
#6
Perhaps she's just suggesting that the notes in a specific song are out of your range.
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#7
I guess the choruses of those kinds of songs tend to hang around the 5th of a minor key, so in C minor you'd be singing quite a few G's...which are not exactly bass material.
#8
I assume she probably just suggested you transpose the song lower to accommodate for the notes you have right now. I happen to think that is ridiculous. Rather than just working with whatever you have, your instructor should really be telling you how you can expand your range of usable notes.
#9
I think what she might be getting at is this.

Let's say you are, indeed, a 'textbook' bass who can sing from the C represented by drop-C tuning to middle C. (second string, first fret)

Now, you have a song in Cm. But!! The lowest note in the song, if it is a C, is going to be your lowest possible note to sing. Nobody sounds great singing their lowest possible note. Nobody.

Another possibility is that the melody goes down below the tonic and comes back up to the tonic.... maybe a note sequence like Eb D C, and then down to Ab, and back upwards to Bb and C. Problem... you can't sing the Ab and Bb!

By the sounds of things, in either of those cases, I would change the vocal key of the song. Drop tuning to C is sludgy enough. Tuning down a further fourth below that,,,, even on a 7-string guitar..... I can't help thinking would just sound sloppy.

Guitar strings are just not meant to sound at those frequencies. You take an E string and drop it down to C..... that's loose enough. Take a low B and tune it down to G.... idunno.... I'm just starting to visualize your strings just flopping around over the fretboard.

CT
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#10
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Nobody sounds great singing their lowest possible note. Nobody.

truth
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Take a low B and tune it down to G.... idunno.... I'm just starting to visualize your strings just flopping around over the fretboard.

CT

well you can actually tune that low with special guitars (meshuggah uses an 8 string baritone that they tune to Low F) you can have normal guitars specially set up to use drop C tuning without too much flappage, but much lower than that and you'll need a baritone or something with a longer scale. also you have to realize you're getting in the bass range in your low end, so if you slap a bass over it unless the strings are pretty taut it's going to sound muddy and "off"