#1
So I've started a new project. It's a 60's Harmony arch top (pics to come). It needs a lot of TLC, but I can see it's potential.

Anyway, it's got a crack around the neck joint (split on both sides) that needs to be fixed. That's not the problem though. I can do that. The problem is proving to be getting the neck off the body.

What's the best way to go about this without further damaging the joint in your opinion?

Any and all tips tricks and pointers will be warmly welcomed.

Thanks in advance!
"There is only one thing more beautiful than one guitar - Two guitars" Frederic Chopin
#2
You are going to need to remove the fretboard first. I'm guessing the neck is glued in with a dovetail joint, so once the fretboard is off, you'll need to remove that joint too. Removing the fretboard and undoing that joint is a pretty difficult, long process. There's a tutorial on projectguitar that tells you how to remove the fretboard.
#3
Quote by littlephil
You are going to need to remove the fretboard first. I'm guessing the neck is glued in with a dovetail joint, so once the fretboard is off, you'll need to remove that joint too. Removing the fretboard and undoing that joint is a pretty difficult, long process. There's a tutorial on projectguitar that tells you how to remove the fretboard.


Read it. Working like a champ. Thanks man!
"There is only one thing more beautiful than one guitar - Two guitars" Frederic Chopin
#4
Well, got the fretboard off, and all it revealed was a block. No screws joints or really anything else.

What now? lol
"There is only one thing more beautiful than one guitar - Two guitars" Frederic Chopin
#5
Can you see any kind of joint where the neck meets the body? Can you get any pictures too, they would help.
#6
"There is only one thing more beautiful than one guitar - Two guitars" Frederic Chopin
#8
That doesn't look like a dovetail to me. But I'm pretty sure 60's harmony's are so it must be covered.

Yeah, removing the fret board was a bad idea because the chance of you getting it glued on just right aren't that great. You might be better off at this point making a new fretboard but if your set on using your old one you are going to want to clamp it to a flat surface so that it doesn't warp to much.
#9
To get the fretboard back on exactly where it was(guaranteed), you either are going to have to replace some fret markers, or frets.

Simply clamp the fb exactly where it needs to be, then drill a small hole either in the fret slot, or in the dot it self. The put in a toothpick in the hole. Do this till it stays in place (2 or 3 of them should do it)

Then remove, and glue it on, with the toothpicks in place. Sand toothpicks flush, then replace the fret marker, or, replace the frets, and re-level all of them.
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#10
^brilliant idea bobby

we need more thinkers like you
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#11


Thanks. A lot of people, when building guitars, do that, but do it in the slot/marker hole, before it's fretted/inlayed, so they don't worry about it moving under the clamp. I just applied the same concept here.
Just call me Bobby
Member of the official GB&C "Who to Listen to" list
Quote by mikeyElite
you build guitars worthy of sexual favors

Quote by Invader Jim
if this party gets any livelier a funeral is gonna break out.