#1
Ok so I have been playing guitar for 5 years ish, I love it I am self taught with some tips from people I have played with. I know how to play a number of songs and all, and I try to learn scales and all but I suck at it I guess would be the easiest way to put it. Same with chords I know basic chords or so I thought but I get confused on them for example http://www.chordbook.com/guitarchords.php I was trying to learn more but I am so confused now on what all these chords are, I guess I wasnt aware of all the chords in each root? Im not sure if im making sense.

So I have two questions I guess.
1) I am wondering i guess what the names of all these chords are in each root and how to get a better understanding of them.

2) As far as scales go I doodle around and can kinda make stuff up but I suck at trying to improvise over someone elses riff. I try to understand reading scale books I just suck at applying it to my playing.

Sorry for this monster of a post but I am just going crazy trying to learn all this.
#2
Get a Guitar teacher.
Your light bulb knows everything you do in your room.
#3
I'll answer the second one. Scales. Learn em. Either by ear or off of a website. Learn them inside and out, with roots on all the low strings and high strings. A good scale to start with is the minor pentatonic, probably the most famous scale in rock music. Learn it and start with a slower rock song and just feel it. You're not gonna get it playing the song once, but play it again and again. As you get better with the scales, you'll start to write your own solos to it and be much better with them.
#4
Quote by Mekchrious
I'll answer the second one. Scales. Learn em. Either by ear or off of a website. Learn them inside and out, with roots on all the low strings and high strings. A good scale to start with is the minor pentatonic, probably the most famous scale in rock music. Learn it and start with a slower rock song and just feel it. You're not gonna get it playing the song once, but play it again and again. As you get better with the scales, you'll start to write your own solos to it and be much better with them.


I would argue that the major scale is more important to learn first as the vast majority of scales are based off it. Understanding scales will help understanding of chord construction.

The major scale is a diatonic scale. It has 7 notes, each one denoted by a different letter. For example: C major scale consists of the notes C, D, E, F, G, A, B. It is the only major scale with no flats or sharps.

There is a guide on this website called The Ultimate Guide To Guitar

Work your way through that slowly (at your own pace) and then ask any questions if you find something you don't understand. Putting what you learn into practice is important, but don't expect to sound awesome overnight. It takes time and you'll need to have patience with yourself.
#5
Chords your best bet imo is to learn how to form them - but the easiest way to do that is to relate it back to scales.

Learn your Major scale. There should be loads of lessons on it. Learn it in terms of steps (WWHWWWH), intervals (root, Maj 2nd, Maj 3rd, Perfect 4th etc) and notes (eg G Maj = G A B C D E F#). Then when you really understand that lot learn to harmonise the scale by stacking 3rds - that will teach you the basics of chord construction, for forming triads (your basic major and minor chords) and 7th chords. Then it should be just a small step to understand how to form altered and extended chords.
#6
How exactly do you play guitar without knowing chords or scales? Either it is possible that you may know some chords, but don't know their names, or just memorise patterns on the fretboard. With music theory, all those things should make sense.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#7
Quote by AlanHB
How exactly do you play guitar without knowing chords or scales? Either it is possible that you may know some chords, but don't know their names, or just memorise patterns on the fretboard. With music theory, all those things should make sense.


I do know some chords like basics I just made a mistake of never studying all them and theory when I started I guess. And same with scales. I just dont know the names or how to incorporate them into a riff very well.

Minor pentatonic is what I always seem to play. When I first started all I played really was a lot of metallica and megadeth and stuff like that and I know for the most part a lot of that 80's stuff deals with that scale. Its just kinda annnoying cause when i improvise I just seem to stay in that. I would like to branch out more.

So I guess I know some chords and all but I just dont know the names and really understand how to tie it together, same with scales.
#8
So I guess I know some chords and all but I just don't know the names and really understand how to tie it together, same with scales.

what you need to learn is diatonic harmony...the study of scales, chords and their inversions, intervals and much more is included in this study...it takes time to digest it...but once you do...the fretboard will not be a mystery...

play well

wolf
#9
Quote by reaper_x
Get a Guitar teacher.


Honestly, this is your best bet. Guidance from someone that knows you...where you are.....what your goals are.....what you need to achieve those goals ......... will serve you much better than random opinions on the internet.
shred is gaudy music
#10
Quote by whiplash_87
and I try to learn scales and all but I suck at it I guess would be the easiest way to put it. Same with chords I know basic chords or so I thought but I get confused on them for example http://www.chordbook.com/guitarchords.php I was trying to learn more but I am so confused now on what all these chords are, I guess I wasnt aware of all the chords in each root? Im not sure if im making sense.
.


Making perfect sense, sounds like you enjoy playing and want to get better. Good- in the end that is the only things that matters.

As far as a good teacher goes, that's always the best advice, but sometimes it's not possible for everyone, i.e. finances, schedules, location....
If you can't get a good teacher, there is still nothing to stop you from learning scales and chords other than having a sound approach and sticking to it. That means a regular practice schedule incorporating the right mix of fundamentals, theory, right & left hand development, rhythms & chords, etc. The biggest mistake people make when trying to learn anything is they feel that there are external requirements that they should meet in some unrealistic time period. That's just nonsense. Go at your own pace, usually the more "even" and realistic your goals and expectations are the more likely you are to be happy with your progress.

When it comes to learning scales, you need to play them very slowly and evenly, preferably using a metronome or time-keeping device and work on them until you are comfortable at a certain speed, then move up until you have a small difficultly keeping up. My 11 year old son is working on this and I see the pattern that creates difficulty in progressing- as soon as he plays a scale twice at a slow speed he can't wait to try and crank the tempo to something he can't possibly keep up with- but he played the first 6 notes in tempo and thinks that means he's almost there - hehehe. It doesn't work that way, when you play the scale slowly you're building up the muscle memory, but even more importantly you are imprinting the "sound of the notes" into your auditory memory. We all know (most at least) how to sing DO - RE - MI - FA - SO - LA - TI - DO, but change to say dorian mode RE to RE and it's not nearly as easy, so the practice at those slow tempos helps to program that in.

As for what scales, primarily just major scales and the dorian and aolean modes, then the major modes of the melodic, harmonic minor scales. On top of that I would stress the pentatonic scale heavily and learning all 5 modes (or positions if you want to think of it in the context of one key). You can pull those up on the site you posted or my favorite is wholenote.com which has a lot good content for theory and lessons.
Main Rig:Yami Pac1412 TransRed (EVO, HS2, Hot Rails) ->Bad Horsie->GNX3K ->MagicStomp->L/R PA
Ampeg VL503, Ampeg V4, Digitech GNX2, Art SGX2K; AXES: Yam Pac1412 RedBurst & Weddington Custom & CPX-15W, '63 Gibson SG Custom & '80 ES-350T
#11
Quote by Myshadow46_2
I would argue that the major scale is more important to learn first as the vast majority of scales are based off it.
This. Everything in western music is either based off of the major scale, or can be best understood by looking at it in comparison with the major scale.

For example:
Someone said to learn the minor pentatonic first. You simply can't derive anything from this. It's a lick. It's a pattern. It's not, for lack of better terminology, a mode.

On the other hand, you can derive anything (debatable) in western music from the major scale. Let's look at the minor pentatonic, since it was mentioned. The formula for the major scale is 1 2 3 4 5 6 7. Lower the 3, 6, and 7 and you have the natural minor scale (1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7). Take out the 2 and 6 and now you have the minor pentatonic.

To take this even further, take out the 4 and you have a minor 7 chord, or the 4 and the 7 and simply a minor chord.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#12
Quote by wolflen
So I guess I know some chords and all but I just don't know the names and really understand how to tie it together, same with scales.

what you need to learn is diatonic harmony...the study of scales, chords and their inversions, intervals and much more is included in this study...it takes time to digest it...but once you do...the fretboard will not be a mystery...

play well

wolf


Do you have any advice on books or websites that give a good intro to this for learning this?
#13
Quote by spkay
Making perfect sense, sounds like you enjoy playing and want to get better. Good- in the end that is the only things that matters.

As far as a good teacher goes, that's always the best advice, but sometimes it's not possible for everyone, i.e. finances, schedules, location....
If you can't get a good teacher, there is still nothing to stop you from learning scales and chords other than having a sound approach and sticking to it. That means a regular practice schedule incorporating the right mix of fundamentals, theory, right & left hand development, rhythms & chords, etc. The biggest mistake people make when trying to learn anything is they feel that there are external requirements that they should meet in some unrealistic time period. That's just nonsense. Go at your own pace, usually the more "even" and realistic your goals and expectations are the more likely you are to be happy with your progress.

When it comes to learning scales, you need to play them very slowly and evenly, preferably using a metronome or time-keeping device and work on them until you are comfortable at a certain speed, then move up until you have a small difficultly keeping up. My 11 year old son is working on this and I see the pattern that creates difficulty in progressing- as soon as he plays a scale twice at a slow speed he can't wait to try and crank the tempo to something he can't possibly keep up with- but he played the first 6 notes in tempo and thinks that means he's almost there - hehehe. It doesn't work that way, when you play the scale slowly you're building up the muscle memory, but even more importantly you are imprinting the "sound of the notes" into your auditory memory. We all know (most at least) how to sing DO - RE - MI - FA - SO - LA - TI - DO, but change to say dorian mode RE to RE and it's not nearly as easy, so the practice at those slow tempos helps to program that in.

As for what scales, primarily just major scales and the dorian and aolean modes, then the major modes of the melodic, harmonic minor scales. On top of that I would stress the pentatonic scale heavily and learning all 5 modes (or positions if you want to think of it in the context of one key). You can pull those up on the site you posted or my favorite is wholenote.com which has a lot good content for theory and lessons.


Yes I want to get better. I can play lots of stuff really well, but it gets kind of old jamming out other bands songs all the time. I want to be able to come up with my own stff. And understand how to compose things better. And what it all means.

I dont really have the time to take lessons due to work and college, I would like to take some classes on my campus in music theory and a guitar class or two. In the mean time though I want to start learning now haha.
#14
Quote by whiplash_87


I dont really have the time to take lessons due to work and college, I would like to take some classes on my campus in music theory and a guitar class or two. In the mean time though I want to start learning now haha.



something like this book could help get you started......

http://www.amazon.com/Music-Theory-Dummies-Michael-Pilhofer/dp/0764578383
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Nov 20, 2009,
#15
if you want to learn how to improvise and construct chord progressions you should learn some basic theory. start with

intervals
major scale and how other scales all come from the C major scale

also you can learn a few licks to use in your solos
you should also learn the notes on the neck

it seems like alot but once you start learning intervals everything starts to make sense
Emerse your soul in love


You used to be alright What happened?


Yellow tigers crouched in jungles in her Dark Eyes .
#16
Ok here is an example of something that confuses me and I know this is dumb but, I was just polishing up on some chords and this confuses me. Ok so just for a example I will use this, AM is A major, and Am is A minor, but what is it when it says A#M is this a different variation of A major im assuming? Sorry newb question I know I just suck at his aspect of guitar and music.
#17
For the most part...........don't ask a bunch of people that dont really know alot about theory. You will merely get discussions that are confusing and inaccurate. I would try to find a more relialbe source.
#18
1) The root for the C major chord is C. The root for an E major Chord is E. The Root for a F#dim(#5#9) chord is F. ect.

To form a major chord first you must know the major scale(which is do re mi fa so la ti do) If you take the first(root, do) note of the scale, the third(mi), the fifth(so) and the octave(higher do) and you have a major scale

Lets say do was C. The C major scale would be C D E F G A B C. Then the C major chord would be C(root, do) E (third, mi) G (fifth, so) and The octave(higher) C.

*also note that maj stands for major

2) Learn as many scales as possible. look for articles on UG for theory. one trusted link that i used is http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/search.php?s=crusade&w=columns Practice one part a week and really focus on what the lesson is.

Also scales are movable and if you learn a scale where the first note(root, usually on the low E string[the lowest string]) is on the Third fret, you could move the scale up the fret and the root would be on a different note and the scale would be in a different key.

A really easy, movable, scale that is excellent for soloing is the pentatonic minor scale. This one is in A. meaning the root is on the note A.
e |--------------------------5--8-|
B |---------------------5-8-------|
G |---------------5-7-------------|
D |----------5-7------------------|
A |-----5-7-----------------------|
E |5-8----------------------------|
Last edited by GNR3737 at Nov 21, 2009,
#19
Quote by whiplash_87
Ok here is an example of something that confuses me and I know this is dumb but, I was just polishing up on some chords and this confuses me. Ok so just for a example I will use this, AM is A major, and Am is A minor, but what is it when it says A#M is this a different variation of A major im assuming? Sorry newb question I know I just suck at his aspect of guitar and music.

No. A# is a not and A#M is the major chord for the A# major scale. Also written A#,
A#maj or A#major
#20
Quote by GNR3737
No. A# is a not and A#M is the major chord for the A# major scale. Also written A#,
A#maj or A#major


Anything with an 'M' after it indicates it is minor, even if its lower case 'm'.
#21
Quote by GNR3737
1)

A really easy, movable, scale that is excellent for soloing is the pentatonic minor scale. This one is in A. meaning the root is on the note A.
e |--------------------------5--8-|
B |---------------------5-8-------|
G |---------------5-7-------------|
D |----------5-7------------------|
A |-----5-7-----------------------|
E |5-8----------------------------|


This is some great advice and the minor pentatonic scale is the basis of many solos. Thanks.

P.S Remember that in this exact position it is in A minor not A
#22
Quote by richrowley
Anything with an 'M' after it indicates it is minor, even if its lower case 'm'.

I used to think that. It doesn't. Look at this website.
http://www.hobby-hour.com/guitar/chords.php?chord=c
also if you have guitar pro, look at the chord dictionary.
Amon Amarth to Frank Zappa
and everything in between.


The A-Z's of music.
#23
I think I'm in the same boat as the original poster. Basically I never really learned to play in the literal sense but I can learn any tabbed song I want. Which sounds a lot like I heard someone say in this thread "learning patterns". I was pretty devestated when I got around a bunch of guitar players and everyone was playing chords together there was no way I could keep up because basically I had to watch their fingers to see the pattern they were playing. So what I'm getting from the posts in this thread is that starting with scales, this will help me with theory. It's so foreign but at the same time I can play crazy songs so it's really frustrating.
#24
I'm a beginner but I guess I can give you an advice with scales. I'd advice to download the program band in a box, get some base samples and improvise on them using the minor pentatonic scale. It's a fairly easy scale, and once you learn the shapes, you just move up or down the neck to fit the key being played in the base, and that's it, almost anything you play fits well. That's what I do at least. And I started last week. And as for chords, I guess the only cool way to learn them is by learning songs that use them. Maybe then you can go deeper and try to learn how they are formed, etc. Cheers.