#1
Right, I've made myself a schedule to stick to everyday, it's nothing that I don't enjoy doing, so it won't make guitar playing a chore, it's just to make sure I don't leave stuff out of my regular playing, and out of practise, the schedule is just to organise my playing to help maximise the efficiency of practise.
Feedback and (Constructive) criticisms are always helpful and accepted! =)

Dedicated Guitar Practise Schedule


WARM UP – 10 Mins
• Finger exercise


THEORY – 15 Mins
• Note Positions
• Finding/Building Scales


CHORDS – 25 Mins
• Chord Progression(15)
• Barres(10)


SCALES – 25 Mins
• Speed Build up
• Linking Positions/Keys
• Finding/Building Scales


TECHNIQUE PRACTISES – 15 Mins
• Legato
• Alternative/Economy picking
• Speed Building


SONG PRACTISE – 30 Mins


JAM
(General guitar playing and non-organised practise)

WARM DOWN – 10 Mins
• Finger exercises
#2
I wouldn't advise assigning an amount of time to practicing something, for example 15 minutes to practice technique, and rather just practice until you've completed whatever exercises or goals you have that day. For I find, at least for me, that allotting a certain amount of time leaves me halfheartedly practicing until the time is spent and I move onto another area of practice.

DON'T PANIC! DON'T PANIC!
THEY DON'T LIKE IT UP 'EM!
#3
Great practice routine. Hopefully you are also playing in a band or Jamming with musicians on a regular basis as well, and if possible playing some gigs. Practice is essential but the skills and demands of playing with, and performing with other musicians provides a completely different and important educational opportunity. Many successful musicians owe much of their success to excellent social networking skills, communication skills and tireless self-promotion that shouldn't be overlooked when striving to build up incredible chops. I.e. make sure to show off those chops at every possible opportunity!
Main Rig:Yami Pac1412 TransRed (EVO, HS2, Hot Rails) ->Bad Horsie->GNX3K ->MagicStomp->L/R PA
Ampeg VL503, Ampeg V4, Digitech GNX2, Art SGX2K; AXES: Yam Pac1412 RedBurst & Weddington Custom & CPX-15W, '63 Gibson SG Custom & '80 ES-350T
#4
I think that a minimum time for practising certain things will stop me from pretty much skipping stuff in anticipation, Like just playing the Am scale a few times before Learning a song I'm really excited about.
I feel that I need some sort of guidelines in place, because I'm naturally lazy but I work quite well in strong schedules.
The times are more a general guideline that's how long I've estimated my normal exercises to take.
Also the technique practise part is split up into three aspects, so if I get bored of practising hammer-ons or bends, I can start practising alternate picking.
#5
Quote by spkay
Great practice routine. Hopefully you are also playing in a band or Jamming with musicians on a regular basis as well, and if possible playing some gigs. Practice is essential but the skills and demands of playing with, and performing with other musicians provides a completely different and important educational opportunity. Many successful musicians owe much of their success to excellent social networking skills, communication skills and tireless self-promotion that shouldn't be overlooked when striving to build up incredible chops. I.e. make sure to show off those chops at every possible opportunity!



Well I'm in my college music club, even though I'm by no means good, I'm the most experienced guitarist and musician there, and have become pretty leader of the whole club (which will number from about 7-15 people depending on attendance) so this is why I have strived to really boost my skills with such stringent practise.
I'm experiencing what it's like to be in a band, and building some band leading skills.
we don't actually jam much yet but I'll make sure we definitely do some jamming soon, and I'm sure that'll end up taking up most of our time together.
#6
that sounds good, but i would say you should never allow technique to be more then half your practice.
#7
Get some sight reading under your belt too, it's a fantastic skill to have.
Call me Batman.
#8
I am currently going through speed mechanics and fretboard mastery by troy stetina and I basically start off with SM till I feel fulfilled then finish my practice off with Fretboard mastery which is more or less a great book on applying theory to guitar.