#1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BweGp3eTmk

Question on this video: for the first exercise that the guy in the glasses shows, is that considered keeping his wrist straight? The timing is 0:53-1:14. My wrist usually angles like that also when playing certain things, and I'm beginning to worry about it. However, I don't see exactly how one should keep the wrist straight when playing exercises/riffs such as that.

for example, when I play this riff:
PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM
S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S
D||-----------------------------------------------|
A||-----------------------------------------------|
F||-----------------------------------------------|
C||--9-------10-------9-------10-------9----10----|
G||----7--7-----7--7----7--7-----7--7----7-----7--|
D||-----------------------------------------------|

PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM
S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S
-----------------------------------------------|
-----------------------------------------------|
-----------------------------------------------|
--9-------10-------9-------10-------9----10----|
----8--8-----8--8----8--8-----8--8----10----10-|
-----------------------------------------------|

PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM
S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S
-----------------------------------------------|
-----------------------------------------------|
-----------------------------------------------|
--9-------10-------9-------10-------9----10----|
----7--7-----7--7----7--7-----7--7----7-----7--|
-----------------------------------------------|


PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM
S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S
----------------------------------------------------------|
----------------------------------------------------------|
----------------------------------------------------------|
--9-------10-------9----10----9-------10-------9----10----|
----8--8-----8--8----8-----8----10-10----10-10---10----10-|
----------------------------------------------------------|

my wrist angles the way his does in the video. Is this ok? And I'm asking if it's ok for IDEAL technique, not just if it's "ok" generally speaking. Or because Jimi Hendrix does it, it makes ok. I want to know how it should be ideally.
Last edited by Moonshield17 at Nov 20, 2009,
#2
If you're worried about "ideal technique" you should get a professional guitar teacher. If you already have one, ask them. They'll probably be much more helpful than the Pit.

I'm a perfect example of my own argument, because I have no idea what the answer to your question is

EDIT: oops, wrong forum, for some reason I thought I was in the Pit

You might actually get decent replies from this one. If so, disregard what I have up there. If not, a pro guitar teacher is still probably the best way to go.
They say that in the army, the food is mighty fine.
The chicken jumped off the table and killed a friend of mine.

Oh lord, I want to go home.
But they won't let me go-o
Ho-oho-ohohahohohome. Hey!
Last edited by militantRocker at Nov 20, 2009,
#3
No, his wrist was most definately bent.
I just played through the tab you posted and had no problem keeping my wrist straight. Is your thumb behind the neck? If not make sure it is.
Speed is a by-product of shut the fuck up.
#4
I ask here because this is the Guitar Technique forum. There are at least a few posters/regulars here who know what ideal technique is and how to achieve it.
#5
While there are lines that require bending at the wrist (especially reaching to lower strings), I think his wrist (and by extension yours?) is a little too bent.

When you're playing that riff you posted it should definitely be possible to keep a straight wrist, take a close look at your posture and experiment some. Definitely get a teacher if you can.
#6
@Aleksi, yes my thumb is behind the neck. that is something I have been working to correct this whole week, because I had a habit of sticking it out above the neck.

here, I took a pic of what my wrist looks like when I play that tab I posted:




If this is wrong, FP or Aleksi, could one of you please show me what your wrist looks like when you are playing that riff? Like I want to know what it looks like from the player's perspective, like from that same angle that I took the pics.
#7
ok so I have another question concerning the wrist. If I've been playing like this for 3 years now, and my wrist hasn't been injured from it or ever been in pain because of it, then would having my wrist not perfectly straight actually effect my playing? Would it slow me down/not allow me to progress? and hence is that why it's known as bad technique?
#8
It looks to me like your wrist is curved too much toward the bottom right of the pics.
I apologize in advance for the monstrous pics.
Here's a shot of my wrist:


And again but with the fingers more visible:


Edit: Having your wrist bent will slow your playing down, it will create excess tension and can cause other problems such as finger independence issues (e.g. you move your ring finger to a new position and the pinky flails around a bit).
Speed is a by-product of shut the fuck up.
Last edited by Aleksi at Nov 20, 2009,
#9
thank you for those pictures. your thumb looks like it's pushing into the neck tho, i'm pretty sure that's also bad tension-wise. also, I can't really tell, but is your palm touching the neck in the 2nd pic?

I've noticed that so far the only way I can keep my wrist straight is if I actually push my forearm out more, meaning instead of keeping my elbow in (as I normally play) I have to push it out, and then only can my wrist keep straight for a riff such as that. I'm pretty sure that's not the right way to approach this problem...ughhh what to dooo.
#10
My thumb isn't actually pushing against the neck, it's just naturally very curly lol. My hand is in the same position in the second pic as it is in the first, just taken from different angles and the palm isn't touching the neck, it's around a centimeter below.
I'm not sure what you mean with regards to the elbow positioning, whenever you change position (like moving from the first fret to the ninth) the movement should come mostly from the arm; the fretting hand stays in pretty much the same position no matter where on the neck you're fretting.
If you can't get it straight you might want to try changing the way you hold your guitar. For example, if you assume the classical position the guitar goes in between your legs and the bottom of the guitar rests upon your left leg. In the classical position the nut of the guitar should be around level with your mouth.
Also it's pretty common for guitarists to slouch a lot when playing, so if you're not already try sitting up straight.
Speed is a by-product of shut the fuck up.
#11
ok, I do play in the classical position. The way you described holding the guitar is basically what I do. I made this video a few days ago for a friend to analyze my hands, but could you take a look and tell me if I'm positioning my left forearm incorrectly? Like should I be sticking out my elbow more? http://s10.photobucket.com/albums/a108/mystique1721/my%20guitars/?action=view&current=Swarmedpracticehandposition.flv
And also I just noticed that my wrist tends to bend more at the lower frets.
#12
It's normal. Just adjust the elbow and thumb as you move down and up.
Sometimes if you don't bend the wrist and put the elbow out on the low frets+strings, you'll have restricted movement and it will feel uncomfortable; sometimes that's ok if you're just playing a couple power chords down there but if you try to do open position (5+ frets wide) near the 1st fret, your wrist will have to be bent a little and you will have to move your elbow move under the neck.
Also try to keep your wrist straight from the opposite direction. What I mean by that is imagine a straight line coming out your forearm and through your hand. In your first pic, your thumb is in that line, and it should be your middle finger (if you don't get it, imagine a wrist brace on your wrist, you can't move it side-to-side).
#13
Quote by tenfold
It's normal. Just adjust the elbow and thumb as you move down and up.
Sometimes if you don't bend the wrist and put the elbow out on the low frets+strings, you'll have restricted movement and it will feel uncomfortable; sometimes that's ok if you're just playing a couple power chords down there but if you try to do open position (5+ frets wide) near the 1st fret, your wrist will have to be bent a little and you will have to move your elbow move under the neck.
Also try to keep your wrist straight from the opposite direction. What I mean by that is imagine a straight line coming out your forearm and through your hand. In your first pic, your thumb is in that line, and it should be your middle finger (if you don't get it, imagine a wrist brace on your wrist, you can't move it side-to-side).


Basically you're saying to just keep the fingers parallel to the frets at all times, right? Like if the wrist should basically be in the same position, whether on the 1st fret or the 9th fret or the 15th fret, then this means it should be "locked" into that position of being parallel with the frets. And so this leads me to another question: If this is indeed how I'm playing, but yet I feel like my wrist isn't "perfectly" straight, then am I just over-analyzing? Or is it possible to play with the fingers parallel to the frets and yet still have a crooked wrist? Because I honestly seem to be doing everything you guys are telling me, and this is just confusing me now.

Btw, thank you guys SO much for your responses and your help. I really do appreciate it. And sorry if I'm being annoying with so many questions. I'm just a bit frustrated with this whole wrist thing and I feel like I cannot/should not continue my normal practice routine until I fix it.
#14
Quote by Moonshield17
ok, I do play in the classical position. The way you described holding the guitar is basically what I do. I made this video a few days ago for a friend to analyze my hands, but could you take a look and tell me if I'm positioning my left forearm incorrectly? Like should I be sticking out my elbow more? http://s10.photobucket.com/albums/a108/mystique1721/my%20guitars/?action=view&current=Swarmedpracticehandposition.flv
And also I just noticed that my wrist tends to bend more at the lower frets.

Your wrist angle's pretty good, you should take a look at it when doing powerchords though, it was bent too much there. Other than that, try to keep your thumb more in the center of the neck.

With regards to the wrist bending more on the lower frets, that's pretty normal, it's not always possible to keep your thumb straight. If it really worries you you can try leaning towards the nut of the guitar a little when playing lower frets.

Oh and, what was that you were playing? It sounded quite good.

Edit: Nevermind, it's Swarmed by Sinergy *facepalm*
I gather you're Mystique from the COB boards right?
Speed is a by-product of shut the fuck up.
Last edited by Aleksi at Nov 21, 2009,
#15
Quote by Moonshield17
ok so I have another question concerning the wrist. If I've been playing like this for 3 years now, and my wrist hasn't been injured from it or ever been in pain because of it, then would having my wrist not perfectly straight actually effect my playing? Would it slow me down/not allow me to progress? and hence is that why it's known as bad technique?


A straight wrist is easier on your tendons and joints and allows you to get more power from your fingers. Bear in mind that you may not have been practicing all that intensely or you may just have been lucky - there's a strong genetic element in carpal tunnel syndrome, for example.

Looking at that vid, why is your thumb so high on the neck at the start? That's why your hand is angled and hence wrist bent. Also, that right hand pinky really shouldn't be sticking straight out like that, definitely not relaxed. A few of the bends at the slow speed were a bit off as well.
#16
Look at his (A.J. Minette - "the guy in the glasses") playing during the "shred" sequence at the beginning of his video. The fretting hand wrist there is flawless...you guys should consider the fact that the exercise he later plays is extremely difficult...it requires utter control of finger independence. The exercise he is playing almost "tricks" you into using larger motions, which means that you need to pay extra attention to wrist angle, finger motion, etc.

Mind you, he was starting to learn classical at this time, so perhaps his finger independence wasn't as great as it is now. And by that, I mean his technique now is so good that he could most likely smoke anyone on this forum, i.e. me, Freepower, etc....believe me, I've seen his skill as his student. I'll try to talk to him when I have my lesson later this week. Hopefully I can post again in order to help everyone here figure out the ideal wrist placement, which can and WILL vary from exercise to exercise.

That being said, your wrist angle should always be relatively straight, although it won't stay affixed in one position like a statue for every note you play. I need to research this in depth...good topic, OP!
Quote by Junior#1
Gilbert mutes with both hands. Palm muting and left hand muting. As for anchoring, he doesn't. He doesn't need to. After all, he's the creator of life, the universe, and everything.
#17
Quote by Aleksi
Your wrist angle's pretty good, you should take a look at it when doing powerchords though, it was bent too much there. Other than that, try to keep your thumb more in the center of the neck.

With regards to the wrist bending more on the lower frets, that's pretty normal, it's not always possible to keep your thumb straight. If it really worries you you can try leaning towards the nut of the guitar a little when playing lower frets.

Oh and, what was that you were playing? It sounded quite good.

Edit: Nevermind, it's Swarmed by Sinergy *facepalm*
I gather you're Mystique from the COB boards right?


Yes, the thumb issue is actually why I made that video in the first place. My friend told me that ideally the thumb shouldn't even be seen over the top of the neck, and apparently I was pushing into the neck with my thumb. so the past few days I have been working on correcting that.

That was Sinergy yes. One of my favorite bands. I think Alexi's playing in Sinergy is just unmatched in Bodom. There was a lot of passion in his fingers back then. And yeah, I am Mystique from the Bodom forum, good catch :p


Quote by Freepower
A straight wrist is easier on your tendons and joints and allows you to get more power from your fingers. Bear in mind that you may not have been practicing all that intensely or you may just have been lucky - there's a strong genetic element in carpal tunnel syndrome, for example.

Looking at that vid, why is your thumb so high on the neck at the start? That's why your hand is angled and hence wrist bent. Also, that right hand pinky really shouldn't be sticking straight out like that, definitely not relaxed. A few of the bends at the slow speed were a bit off as well.


This is the video that I PM'd you but you couldn't watch. The thumb was my main concern then :p

The right hand pinky is something that Michael pointed out to me also. I will practice with it tucked in now, thanks. Also, I think you may be right about not practicing all that intensely. I'm going to start doing your finger independence exercises I think the lack of independence in my fingers is a contributing factor to the wrist moving around and not keeping straight.

thank you guys!
#18
Quote by plainsight
Look at his (A.J. Minette - "the guy in the glasses") playing during the "shred" sequence at the beginning of his video. The fretting hand wrist there is flawless...you guys should consider the fact that the exercise he later plays is extremely difficult...it requires utter control of finger independence. The exercise he is playing almost "tricks" you into using larger motions, which means that you need to pay extra attention to wrist angle, finger motion, etc.

Mind you, he was starting to learn classical at this time, so perhaps his finger independence wasn't as great as it is now. And by that, I mean his technique now is so good that he could most likely smoke anyone on this forum, i.e. me, Freepower, etc....believe me, I've seen his skill as his student. I'll try to talk to him when I have my lesson later this week. Hopefully I can post again in order to help everyone here figure out the ideal wrist placement, which can and WILL vary from exercise to exercise.

That being said, your wrist angle should always be relatively straight, although it won't stay affixed in one position like a statue for every note you play. I need to research this in depth...good topic, OP!


"Hopefully I can post again in order to help everyone here figure out the ideal wrist placement, which can and WILL vary from exercise to exercise."

this is good to know. thanks!
#19
Quote by Moonshield17
Basically you're saying to just keep the fingers parallel to the frets at all times, right? Like if the wrist should basically be in the same position, whether on the 1st fret or the 9th fret or the 15th fret, then this means it should be "locked" into that position of being parallel with the frets.

You won't be able to get it straight all the time, but most. Just keep it as straight as can be without curling up into a pretzel.

Quote by Moonshield17
If this is indeed how I'm playing, but yet I feel like my wrist isn't "perfectly" straight, then am I just over-analyzing?

Yeah. With certain stretches and neck positions, you just won't be able to get your wrist completely straight.

Quote by Moonshield17
is it possible to play with the fingers parallel to the frets and yet still have a crooked wrist?

Very possible, especially at the lower frets where your wrist bends more to keep your fingers parallel and the stretch wide.
#20
Look at his (A.J. Minette - "the guy in the glasses") playing during the "shred" sequence at the beginning of his video. The fretting hand wrist there is flawless...you guys should consider the fact that the exercise he later plays is extremely difficult...it requires utter control of finger independence. The exercise he is playing almost "tricks" you into using larger motions, which means that you need to pay extra attention to wrist angle, finger motion, etc.

Mind you, he was starting to learn classical at this time, so perhaps his finger independence wasn't as great as it is now. And by that, I mean his technique now is so good that he could most likely smoke anyone on this forum, i.e. me, Freepower, etc....believe me, I've seen his skill as his student. I'll try to talk to him when I have my lesson later this week. Hopefully I can post again in order to help everyone here figure out the ideal wrist placement, which can and WILL vary from exercise to exercise.


It is a very classical kind of exercise that, I was wondering where'd he'd picked it up. Actually, totally approve of all those exercises, very like what I was doing myself a few years ago (take a look at the spider exercises in the sticky. )

There's a couple of people on this forum would smoke him they're just keeping quiet about it, trust me. Having been here as long as I have you start to become aware of who the real big fish are in the forum pond.

Imho, while the ideal wrist placement may vary a little from exercises to exercise (string groups being the most important consideration) - the principle behind wrist placement is unchanging - as straight as possible. There are simple physiological reasons for this.

Quote by Moonshield17
The right hand pinky is something that Michael pointed out to me also. I will practice with it tucked in now, thanks. Also, I think you may be right about not practicing all that intensely. I'm going to start doing your finger independence exercises I think the lack of independence in my fingers is a contributing factor to the wrist moving around and not keeping straight.

thank you guys!


"Tucked in" isn't perhaps the best expression. Relax your hand totally. Put a pick in between index and thumb - that's your ideal right hand posture.

You've got the wrist finger causality backwards btw - if your wrist isn't fairly straight then your fingers have to do more work and if your hand is angled (like yours was in your vid) the fingers have uneven distances to travel to fret notes, leading very quickly to favoring fingers 123 strongly even when 4 is available and more useful! (bearing in mind you PM'd me about pinky use, this is partly why your pinky seems so useless - it's actually better than your ring finger when you develop it).
#21
Quote by Freepower
It is a very classical kind of exercise that, I was wondering where'd he'd picked it up. Actually, totally approve of all those exercises, very like what I was doing myself a few years ago (take a look at the spider exercises in the sticky. )

There's a couple of people on this forum would smoke him they're just keeping quiet about it, trust me. Having been here as long as I have you start to become aware of who the real big fish are in the forum pond.

Imho, while the ideal wrist placement may vary a little from exercises to exercise (string groups being the most important consideration) - the principle behind wrist placement is unchanging - as straight as possible. There are simple physiological reasons for this.


"Tucked in" isn't perhaps the best expression. Relax your hand totally. Put a pick in between index and thumb - that's your ideal right hand posture.

You've got the wrist finger causality backwards btw - if your wrist isn't fairly straight then your fingers have to do more work and if your hand is angled (like yours was in your vid) the fingers have uneven distances to travel to fret notes, leading very quickly to favoring fingers 123 strongly even when 4 is available and more useful! (bearing in mind you PM'd me about pinky use, this is partly why your pinky seems so useless - it's actually better than your ring finger when you develop it).


I use my pinky quite a bit actually. Especially for scale run type of things. Although I'll admit that my ring finger does seem to be the strongest out of all my fingers (has the biggest callous on it).

And I've been studying/researching how to keep the wrist straight for 3 days now, and I still don't feel as if I'm doing it right =/
I have my thumb behind the neck, it's not pushing into the neck and is fairly relaxed, my fingers are parallel to the frets when I play, my palm is not touching the neck, the angle of my forearm and elbow seems to be correct (I'm assuming since no one said anything about them being wrong from the vid) and they feel relaxed, but yet my wrist doesn't look like the pictures Aleksi posted when I actually play that riff. I don't know what else I could be doing wrong. perhaps I should just move to Dublin and start lessons, lol. that's one of the main reasons I don't take guitar lessons here. Many of the guitar "teachers" out there have no clue about what ideal technique is and all they'll do is teach you how to play songs. seems like a waste of time and money.
#22
And I've been studying/researching how to keep the wrist straight for 3 days now, and I still don't feel as if I'm doing it right =/


Three days isn't all that much time really, is it? I've been fiddling with posture here and there for the last 4 years.

And you shouldn't stop playing completely until you get it "fixed". There's a process of adjustments and refinements and finding your comfort zone that will help.

they feel relaxed, but yet my wrist doesn't look like the pictures Aleksi posted when I actually play that riff.


If they feel relaxed and your thumb's behind the neck then I wouldn't worry too much for now, experiment continuously but don't stress it.

Secondly, never expect your hands to look exactly like someone else's even when you are doing exactly the same thing. I spent ages flipping out because I couldn't mimic Shawn Lane's picking style until I realized that the guy had rubber hands and that his style worked for him because of that - although I could take almost everything I liked about it and use a much more comfortable pick grip with my inflexible digits.

Don't worry about recreating what people's hands look like, but try to recreate what it feels like to be able to play like them. There's a big difference!

Although I'll admit that my ring finger does seem to be the strongest out of all my fingers (has the biggest callous on it).


And which finger do you bend the most with?

Many of the guitar "teachers" out there have no clue about what ideal technique is and all they'll do is teach you how to play songs. seems like a waste of time and money.


You'd be surprised how many people are only really interested in learning a few songs.

More importantly, why don't you ask around and find out who the good guitar teachers are in your area? What part of Cali are you in?
#23
Odd...I had no idea wrist position affected speed.

I usually play with a "hanging thumb", gripping the neck with my hand. Might be why my pinky finger is so friggin stiff.
Setup:
Ibanez GRG170DX
- D'Addario 9s
Squier Stratocaster
- D'Addario 11s
Kona Cutaway Acoustic
- D'Addario 12s
Kona K35 Amp
Rocktron Metal Planet Distortion Pedal
Dunlop Original Crybaby Wah
#24
Of course wrist position affects speed - speed is about accuracy and economy of movement, if your wrist isn't in the right place at the right time, how the hell are your fingers gonna get there?

Think about it this way - what are your fingers pushing against? If you play like that you have to push out with your arm while applying force the other direction with wrist and fingers. That's nasty antagonistic muscle use there and will **** you up pretty quickly if you're playing seriously. If you use the left hand thumb properly then you can use the weight of your arm to provide a lot of the force for barres and half barres and the fingers can apply pressure more precisely and more economically with a counterpart.
#25
Quote by Freepower
Three days isn't all that much time really, is it? I've been fiddling with posture here and there for the last 4 years.

true, but I just felt like after studying about it so much, I should at least be able to form a straight wrist with all my newfound knowledge. For example, when I learned that the thumb shouldn't be sticking out at all over the neck, it only took me about 20 minutes of experimenting to get it in the right, comfortable position behind the neck. So I was thoroughly frustrated yesterday when I couldn't do the same with my wrist posture.

And you shouldn't stop playing completely until you get it "fixed". There's a process of adjustments and refinements and finding your comfort zone that will help.


If they feel relaxed and your thumb's behind the neck then I wouldn't worry too much for now, experiment continuously but don't stress it.

Secondly, never expect your hands to look exactly like someone else's even when you are doing exactly the same thing. I spent ages flipping out because I couldn't mimic Shawn Lane's picking style until I realized that the guy had rubber hands and that his style worked for him because of that - although I could take almost everything I liked about it and use a much more comfortable pick grip with my inflexible digits.

rubber hands? lol, so I'm guessing this is why his picking hand looks like it floats.


Don't worry about recreating what people's hands look like, but try to recreate what it feels like to be able to play like them. There's a big difference!

Alright so as long as my hands are relaxed and comfortable, does this mean it is safe for me to go on practicing, even if my wrist isn't straight all the time? And I should keep experimenting while I practice?


And which finger do you bend the most with?

haha, yes, I know, I thought of that


You'd be surprised how many people are only really interested in learning a few songs.

More importantly, why don't you ask around and find out who the good guitar teachers are in your area? What part of Cali are you in?

Los Angeles, and I've been thinking of maybe attending Musician's Institute (where the great Paul Gilbert studied and gives lessons there from time to time) but I'm not fond of the Los Angeles city life at all. I'd prefer to enter a music conservatory in a less populated, not-so-urban location.
#26
Alright so as long as my hands are relaxed and comfortable, does this mean it is safe for me to go on practicing, even if my wrist isn't straight all the time? And I should keep experimenting while I practice?


Yes, and yes. Just make sure you listen to your hands and if they need a break, give it to them.

Los Angeles, and I've been thinking of maybe attending Musician's Institute (where the great Paul Gilbert studied and gives lessons there from time to time) but I'm not fond of the Los Angeles city life at all. I'd prefer to enter a music conservatory in a less populated, not-so-urban location.


Fair enough. Why'd you want to go to music college? What are your goals? How will that help you achieve them?

Just asking cause I was all up over the west coast of Cali for the summer of 02, I remember most of it pretty well. I can see why you don't want to live in LA.
#27
Quote by Freepower
Yes, and yes. Just make sure you listen to your hands and if they need a break, give it to them.

will do, thanks


Fair enough. Why'd you want to go to music college? What are your goals? How will that help you achieve them?

Just asking cause I was all up over the west coast of Cali for the summer of 02, I remember most of it pretty well. I can see why you don't want to live in LA.


I want to go to a music conservatory because I feel like there is nothing else I'd rather do in life. Like I know this is my passion and I want to pursue it. Forgive me if this sounds a bit strange, but I honestly wouldn't care to live if it weren't for music. I've come to slowly realize this after 22 years of living, and it feels wonderful to know what I really want to do. The hard part is actually doing it.

As for goals:
-I need to learn a lot more theory because I want to be able to write music that I enjoy, the way I enjoy Vivaldi, Alexi Laiho, Hans Zimmer, and a few other musicians/composers.
- keep perfecting my guitar technique
-improve my musicianship capabilities (such as be able to transcribe by ear, jam along with someone once I figure out what key they are in, etc), and perhaps most importantly be able to write out the music that I hear in my head and make it come to life on guitar.
-learn classical guitar
-learn violin

I realize I can actually achieve these goals without a attending a music school, but doing it alone is not a very easy task. There will be times where I need motivation to continue, and I wont always find it on the internet forums

About Cali- yeah, this place is waaay too populated. I mean the weather is lovely and all, but I think this country itself is going to shit. Not to mention the superficial people that surround you over here. Everyone is really fake and only after money/materialistic goods. I want to go try out Norway actually.

But how do you like living in Dublin? How's the lifestyle, the people? Would you want to relocate? I was looking at travelzoo the other day and I found some really cheap airfair to Dublin, haha. But it was like a vacation package deal.
#28
The hard part is actually doing it.


That and making a living simultaneously. How're you planning to do that? Obviously your location is great, massive amounts of session work and possible pupils if you can stand the people.

But how do you like living in Dublin? How's the lifestyle, the people? Would you want to relocate? I was looking at travelzoo the other day and I found some really cheap airfair to Dublin, haha. But it was like a vacation package deal.


I don't live the normal lifestyle and don't meet the normal people but I'm very happy where I am. I can't really relocate because my business is just starting to do well - and I can't relocate my pupils too!

On the other hand, I guess if I had the choice I might live in Melbourne or the north of Cali in the redwoods, gorgeous places with cool people.

If you come through Dublin gimme a buzz and we can have a jam/lesson/chat.
#29
Quote by Freepower
That and making a living simultaneously. How're you planning to do that? Obviously your location is great, massive amounts of session work and possible pupils if you can stand the people.

Exactly, I still have a lot to figure out. I just got my bachelor's degree in philosophy so I'm trying to figure out how to put that in use for the time being. And then later when I'm more qualified to be a working musician, I can get started on that.


I don't live the normal lifestyle and don't meet the normal people but I'm very happy where I am. I can't really relocate because my business is just starting to do well - and I can't relocate my pupils too!

wow, this sounds interesting. I'm really happy for you. Actually Michael (fixationdarknes) has told me a lot about how you have helped him and what a great teacher you've been; and we're very sure that you will make it big one day. So keep going

On the other hand, I guess if I had the choice I might live in Melbourne or the north of Cali in the redwoods, gorgeous places with cool people.

If you come through Dublin gimme a buzz and we can have a jam/lesson/chat.

Yes, Northern Cali is very beautiful indeed. I'm sure I will take you up on the Dublin offer one day. And of course if you ever come back to the Los Angeles area make sure to let me know, as we can do the same over here.