#1
I used to be able to hit reeeeaaally high falsetto, but now everytime I try to do it, it sounds really weak and muffled. Can someone tell if there's a way to over come it?
#2
Depending on how old you are your voice can just be changing and deepening and it may not be possible to hit that note.
is too young to be versed in such grown up ways...

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#3
NothingRocks: Watch yourself singing in the mirror. No, really! I am a singer, have been for over 25 years. I have lost my voice numerous times through sickness and have had to rebuild my singing voice as many times again. I still have the voice, and its better than ever. Watch how you normally sing. Anything.

Are you lifting your head and pulling back so you are facing the ceiling? That closes down your throat and pulls your vocal chords tighter, so you can't sing as well. Try pulling your upper neck where your head meets it (at that little dip) with your hand, and pull your neck pretty straight and tall (it feels good anyway). Lower your jaw a little (not tucked into your chest, just lowered so it is straight ahead). Lift your shoulders, all the way up, pull them back, and round them down. Don't move your chest or your neck at this point. Breathe in, all the way to your stomach for a count of four, hold for a count of four, blow out through your mouth for a count of eight. Do this several times, and you probably will feel a little lightheaded from all that oxygen. Breathe into your stomach and sing from those muscles, rather than from your neck.


Ok, chest lifted comfortably, neck straight chin straight ahead. Try singing a scale up to those reeeealy high falsetto notes. Open your mouth and stick your first and second fingers in the familiar gun shape between your teeth. You need your mouth open that much for better sound. You can remove the fingers! Pretend you have a boiled whole egg at the back of your mouth, on your soft palate (visualize) when you are singing. It will help you to lift that soft palate to get those high notes. Now, after you have vocalized scales and your voice is warmed up (I cannot stress how important regular vocal exercises, like scales, are to maintaining your voice) try getting into those high falsettos again.

Also, of course, whiskey/beer/etc. and smokey interiors (including interior of lungs with whatever kind of smoke) kill the vocal chords. Drink plenty of tea with honey (herb tea, not caffeinated, not juice, not citrus or caffeine anything when you are singing), and it will soothe your throat and keep your vocal chords warm when you sing (a must for good vocals). Ice water, cold sodas/beer, etc. are the worst thing for vocal chords next to the whiskey and smokes. If you can't find warm beverages like tea, drink plain water, room temp. when you are performing.

Wear a scarf or other neckwear to keep the chords warm too.

All of this stuff sounds very silly, I know. But singers, especially rock/pop singers do it all wrong, and their voices are trashed/thrashed sooner than they need to be.

You should be reclaiming some of those high notes soon if you do these things.
#5
Quote by miumiu
Breathe in, all the way to your stomach for a count of four, hold for a count of four, blow out through your mouth for a count of eight. Do this several times, and you probably will feel a little lightheaded from all that oxygen. Breathe into your stomach and sing from those muscles, rather than from your neck.

The count of eight is definitely a very good way to warm up for singing...snap your fingers for the count and feel the rhythm. I've done it as a warm-up in more choirs or chorale groups than I can remember.

Also, pay special attention to the "Breathe into your stomach", and let me add a side-note: When you breathe, your chest should never expand and your shoulders should never raise. Instead, you should be able to look down and see more mass growing in your shirt: breathing directly and only into your stomach gives you much more air and much better support. Make sure to use your stomach muscles with singing and the air, as well (more commonly known as your abdominals). A teacher of mine used to always tell me that at the end of a 2-hour practice session, my abs should feel like they went through the workout of their lives. And to be completely honest, when I'm really concentrated or focused on singing for two or more hours, my stomach is wrenching (not in a bad way haha).
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