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#1
Hey UG

I am begining to take an interest in music technology and with a magazine this month came this EZ drummer lite software, which I thought was very coincidental seeing as I have decided to buy the full version for Christmas with the DFH and Vintage Rock expansions (The magazine in question is Computer Music just incase you were interested). Anyway, I was messing around with it trying to pop some midi files from the grooves section into Cubase (SX3) and it wouldn't play back.

Could anyone please tell me how to put the files into Cubase so they play back??

Thanks in advance, Aidan.
#2
I've never used EZ Drummer or Cubase, but to start with have you selected an instrument for the channel/track to playback the MIDI file in? MIDI isn't a sound, it's digital information telling a program how to playback a saved pattern/song with whatever instrument set is selected.

Presumably you need to select the instrument set for playing it back, but I imagine you're supposed to set-up some sort of track in EZ Drummer itself and record it as a stereo .wav file and import that into Cubase, in order to use EZ Drummer's sampled hits instead of an instrument set in Cubase.

If I'm horribly wrong, I apologise - I use Logic Studio and Pro Tools and am yet to use a dedicated drum sequencer, having only occasionally even programmed drums for song ideas in Ultrabeat!

Edit: Also, when trying to use midi instruments, the individual track playing back the MIDI needs to be created as a MIDI track rather than an Audio Track (which you actually record into with a mic/line in.
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Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Nov 21, 2009,
#3
Yeah the above poster is spot on. Midi isn't sound its just musical placement holders basically (in this case it tells the actual drum machine what bits to play and when), you need to assign EzDrummer to a channel and then place the midi track on that channel that EzDrummer is assigned to to hear anything.
#4
Open up the vst instrument in the Devices menu (F11).
Click a dropdown and pick EZDrummer, set up the drums.
Make a new MIDI track (Project>Add Track>MIDI).
Set the out (left-middle) to EZDrummer.
Use the pencil (Draw) tool right of the record button to create a block timespan.
Open the drum editor (MIDI>Open Drum Editor).
Use the drumstick tool to draw in your beat.
Play it back, export it, and whatever else.
#5
Yeah, the above guy got it. I had already figured it out about 30 minutes after I asked this question so I apologise for wasting your time.

Thanks anyway
#6
why the hell does everyone seem to have a version of Cubase that's 5 years out of date?
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#10
Because a newer up-to-date version is quite expensive and i'm only a student who doesn't really have those funds.

Plus some decent vst's (one being ezdrummer and the expansions I mentioned) and an interface is needed for me first seeing as I already have a version of cubase that will see me through to the point where I do have the funds for a newer version.
#11
Quote by bass wizard
Because a newer up-to-date version is quite expensive and i'm only a student who doesn't really have those funds.

Plus some decent vst's (one being ezdrummer and the expansions I mentioned) and an interface is needed for me first seeing as I already have a version of cubase that will see me through to the point where I do have the funds for a newer version.



but why use something so outdated when there are modern free/cheap equivalents that kick its ass?

though i rarely use it anymore, Reaper has made old crap like SX3 cracks thoroughly redundant.
#12
Fair do's, but in my opinion the version of cubase that I have will see me through untill I need to get a newer one. But thanks for your advice =D
#13
Quote by TheDriller
but why use something so outdated when there are modern free/cheap equivalents that kick its ass?

though i rarely use it anymore, Reaper has made old crap like SX3 cracks thoroughly redundant.


People on this forum have bizarre ways of justifying not using Reaper, Compression and interfaces.

Silly really.
#15
Quote by Beefmo
People on this forum have bizarre ways of justifying not using Reaper, Compression and interfaces.

Silly really.


There are plenty of good reasons not to use compression, or not to use too much of it, it's one of the most over abused production tools out there ATM, even moreso than auto-tune, but that whole thing is a topic for another thread.
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#16
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
There are plenty of good reasons not to use compression, or not to use too much of it, it's one of the most over abused production tools out there ATM, even moreso than auto-tune, but that whole thing is a topic for another thread.

+1. Death Magnetic is a testament to that.
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#18
Saying compression is bad is like saying dicks are bad because some people get raped.
#19
Quote by Beefmo
You're both idiots.

No; simply pointing out that people over-use compression nowadays is hardly being an idiot. I imagine you're someone who likes to flatten out the dynamics of a track so much that the master level rarely drops below -0.1 dBFS As Thorazine said, a discussion would belong in another thread entirely, but if you really consider us idiots I doubt there's any point trying to reason with you.
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Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Nov 26, 2009,
#20
Quote by DisarmGoliath
No; simply pointing out that people over-use compression nowadays is hardly being an idiot. I imagine you're someone who likes to flatten out the dynamics of a track so much that the master level rarely drops below 0.1 dBFS As Thorazine said, a discussion would belong in another thread entirely, but if you really consider us idiots I doubt there's any point trying to reason with you.


No theres not because you're both wrong.

Compression is not bad, its bad if you overuse it, but then you could apply that argument to anything.

Delay is bad because people could overuse it, distortion is bad because people could overuse it etc etc etc.

Your point is wrong because if you don't use any compression at all then your mix will suck donkey dick, so therefore compression is a good thing that like all good things should not be overused.

And no I definitely take it easy with the limiting, no higher than -10dBFS average usually.
Last edited by Beefmo at Nov 23, 2009,
#22
Quote by Beefmo
No theres not because you're both wrong.

Compression is not bad, its bad if you overuse it, but then you could apply that argument to anything.

Delay is bad because people could overuse it, distortion is bad because people could overuse it etc etc etc.

Your point is wrong because if you don't use any compression at all then your mix will suck donkey dick, so therefore compression is a good thing that like all good things should not be overused.


His point isn't really wrong, because even a lot of pros tend to use compression excessively as a cure all to problems that are better fixed by something else, compression certainly has its place but even here I've seen people (including yourself) recommending compression to fix things that probably shouldn't be fixed with compression. Also saying that you absolutely need compression in your mix is completely wrong.

Quote by CatharsisStudio
uncompressed vocals and snares are gay. you need compression for drums. peroid


That depends on the genre of music. For metal and hard rock crompression works great on drums, for jazz and classical, not so much.
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Last edited by Kid_Thorazine at Nov 23, 2009,
#23
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
His point isn't really wrong, because even a lot of pros tend to use compression excessively as a cure all to problems that are better fixed by something else, compression certainly has its place but even here I've seen people (including yourself) recommending compression to fix things that probably shouldn't be fixed with compression. Also saying that you absolutely need compression in your mix is completely wrong.


Yeah, you try sitting a getting a dynamic drummer, bassist or vocalist sitting right in a mix without compression, its impossible, if you actually knew jack shit you'd know that.

And no, pros use a lot of compression because it makes their mixes sound better, rock engineers even with well tracked bands will use large amounts of compression, again another misleading point.
#24
Quote by Beefmo
Yeah, you try sitting a getting a dynamic drummer, bassist or vocalist sitting right in a mix without compression, its impossible, if you actually knew jack shit you'd know that.

And no, pros use a lot of compression because it makes their mixes sound better, rock engineers even with well tracked bands will use large amounts of compression, again another misleading point.


no it really isn't, if you knew anything about record producing you would know that. A lot of producers tend to use compression as a band aid. Most good drummers and bassists can control thier dynamics properly in a studio and a good vocalist can work the mic properly in order to avoid dynamics problems.
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Last edited by Kid_Thorazine at Nov 23, 2009,
#26
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
no it really isn't, if you knew anything about record producing you would know that. A lot of producers tend to use compression as a band aid.




Yeah, you're so right.



You're a funny guy, should be a comedian cos you ain't gonna make a record engineer.

What are your oh-so-good counter solutions to one the best mixing tool ever invented then? We automate everything to the hilt because your vocalist isn't all at the same level and your bass player is playing with varying volume levels because he likes using his fingers.

You gonna tell your vocalist to sing all at the same volume and hand your bass player a pick?

You gonna tell your drummer to hit the snare like a machine, so you can find that consistency.

Non-use of compression isn't a realistic expectation unless you're working with machines.
#27
Quote by CatharsisStudio
no i am saying the sound of a snare uncompressed (pretty much zero processing) blows theres no massive WHACK


yeah, you don't always want that massive whack either, like I said it depends on the style and genre.
Quote by Beefmo


Yeah, you're so right.



You're a funny guy, should be a comedian cos you ain't gonna make a record engineer.

What are your oh-so-good counter solutions to one the best mixing tool ever invented then? We automate everything to the hilt because your vocalist isn't all at the same level and your bass player is playing with varying volume levels because he likes using his fingers.

You gonna tell your vocalist to sing all at the same volume and hand your bass player a pick?

You gonna tell your drummer to hit the snare like a machine, so you can find that consistency.

Non-use of compression isn't a realistic expectation unless you're working with machines.


That's funny because I am an engineer, I never said to use no compression, I said it's massively overused, you seem to come from the "I can't mix anything unless it has zero dynamics" camp, it's not hard to make something with varying volume levels sit well in a mix without putting massive amounts of compression on it, just listen to any recording made in the 60s and 70s.
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Last edited by Kid_Thorazine at Nov 23, 2009,
#28
I fail to see where either me or Kid_Thorazine said compression (as a whole) was bad; the over-use of it is what was commented on. Beefmo - you are just trying to kick up a big fuss over nothing; go back to your little world where you're the greatest sound engineer on the planet and know everything there is to know.

Catharsis at least seems to have made an effort to politely stress his uses for compression, and I respect him anyway having briefly spoke before about active nearfields. I also happen to use compression, being someone who mainly works with rock and metal.
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#29
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
yeah, you don't always want that massive whack either, like I said it depends on the style and genre.


That's funny because I am an engineer, I never said to use no compression, I said it's massively overused, you seem to come from the "I can't mix anything unless it has zero dynamics" camp, it's not hard to make something with varying volume levels sit well in a mix without putting massive amounts of compression on it, just listen to any recording made in the 60s and 70s.


Yeah, no one uses those mixes for reference anymore, because, yknow, they sounded good in the 60s and 70s, but here we are 40 years later, and we use this shit now - because yknow, it sounds good.

I'm not in the zero dynamics camp either but you said it yourself "it's not hard to make something with varying volume levels sit well in a mix without putting massive amounts of compression" and they key point in that statement is massive amounts, because whilst you don't always need loads, you do need some.

Your first post said there were "plenty of good reasons not to use compression" (the implication of that being "at all) so already you've backtracked into saying that you do need to use it, if a little less than most modern engineers do.

But this shit, I think we need to say this more, COMPRESSION IS GOOD, used in moderation, or even heavily in some situations, it sounds good to our ears. You're all just assuming that because I say that I sit at home and watch the volume reduction hit -18 on every single channel I compress.
#31
Quote by CatharsisStudio
i respect the shit out of beefmo. btw.

Having been away from here for a while, and not currently having the internet at my new apartment, your name is one of few I do remember and respect. Perhaps I've encountered Beefmo before and would have had reason to give his words a warmer response, but either I haven't or I have forgotten completely.
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#32
Quote by DisarmGoliath
I fail to see where either me or Kid_Thorazine said compression (as a whole) was bad; the over-use of it is what was commented on. Beefmo - you are just trying to kick up a big fuss over nothing; go back to your little world where you're the greatest sound engineer on the planet and know everything there is to know.


Yeah and go back to your world were you politely discourage people from trying something that is an essential part of just about every production imaginable, with Death Magnetic as your oh so predictable testament to correctness in implying that it is "a cure all" or that "There are plenty of good reasons not to use compression".

URGH.
#33
Quote by DisarmGoliath
Having been away from here for a while, and not currently having the internet at my new apartment, your name is one of few I do remember and respect. Perhaps I've encountered Beefmo before and would have had reason to give his words a warmer response, but either I haven't or I have forgotten completely.


If I seem a tad on the edge its just because it gets on my wick when something is discouraged that's an intimate part of any record. I'd rather the people here attempted to use compression and did it badly than left their mixes uncompressed and sheddy sounding, because at least they'd be trying something.

I'm just sick and tired of people trying to dodge the fact that it is very much an essential.
#34
Quote by Beefmo
Yeah and go back to your world were you politely discourage people from trying something that is an essential part of just about every production imaginable, with Death Magnetic as your oh so predictable testament to correctness in implying that it is "a cure all" or that "There are plenty of good reasons not to use compression".

URGH.

Whatever, at least I acknowledge that I don't know everything and can only go by advice given on the Sound Engineering & Production degree I'm half-way through - as far as I've been taught, compression shouldn't be something you automatically go for straight away, but instead you should use your ears and listen to what is wrong in the mix first and what could be improved and then you go about implementing those desired changes.

And I still didn't claim compression is bad.
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#35
Quote by Beefmo
Yeah, no one uses those mixes for reference anymore, because, yknow, they sounded good in the 60s and 70s, but here we are 40 years later, and we use this shit now - because yknow, it sounds good.

I'm not in the zero dynamics camp either but you said it yourself "it's not hard to make something with varying volume levels sit well in a mix without putting massive amounts of compression" and they key point in that statement is massive amounts, because whilst you don't always need loads, you do need some.

Your first post said there were "plenty of good reasons not to use compression" (the implication of that being "at all) so already you've backtracked into saying that you do need to use it, if a little less than most modern engineers do.

But this shit, I think we need to say this more, COMPRESSION IS GOOD, used in moderation, or even heavily in some situations, it sounds good to our ears. You're all just assuming that because I say that I sit at home and watch the volume reduction hit -18 on every single channel I compress.


I didn't backtrack, there are good reasons not to use any compression at all, (try putting compression on a solo classical performance or somesuch) And a whoole shitton of people whould disagree with you about older records not sounding good, they certainly sound far more dynamic than modern records tend to, and to a lot of people that's a very good thing.

And yes many producers do attempt to use compression as a cure all, or out of laziness because they don't feel like using automation (or riding faders if you want to go old school) to fix simple volume imbalance issues and whatnot.
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Last edited by Kid_Thorazine at Nov 23, 2009,
#37
Quote by CatharsisStudio
i like new cds and i like old cds. also you compress the **** out of orchestral instruments in mixing. maybe not tracking but mixing in to a song. of like, rock,metal,country,pop

maybe not in classical though


you usually use little to no compression for classical recordings, (you also try to stay away from using a lot of it in Jazz) because subtle dynamics are extremely important in those genres, and also using heavy compression on string instruments tends to make them sound fake.
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#38
Quote by DisarmGoliath
Whatever, at least I acknowledge that I don't know everything and can only go by advice given on the Sound Engineering & Production degree I'm half-way through - as far as I've been taught, compression shouldn't be something you automatically go for straight away, but instead you should use your ears and listen to what is wrong in the mix first and what could be improved and then you go about implementing those desired changes.

And I still didn't claim compression is bad.


Of course it shouldn't be something you dive for straight away, but I bet on your degree they encourage you to find use for it.

Kid, they do very much use compression on classical records:

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jan08/articles/qa0108_1.htm

And you can rant and rave some stereotypical spoonfed position about how some people prefer recordings from the old days, people arent coming here with tape machines and 36 track analogue mixing desks asking to sound like Frank ****ing Sinatra, be realistic.
#39
Quote by Beefmo
Of course it shouldn't be something you dive for straight away, but I bet on your degree they encourage you to find use for it.

Kid, they do very much use compression on classical records:

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jan08/articles/qa0108_1.htm

And you can rant and rave some stereotypical spoonfed position about how some people prefer recordings from the old days, people arent coming here with tape machines and 36 track analogue mixing desks asking to sound like Frank ****ing Sinatra, be realistic.


uhh, that guy recommended using automation instead of of a compressor, which is would I would do as well, I also said especially solo instruments, where very subtle dynamics come to the forefront.
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#40
Also since when did we go to discussing classical, I thought we were meant to be talking about music that was relevant to this forums interests, because yknow, thats what they'd be using compression on.
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