#1
Ok, this is mainly for piano, but all music theory is the same, so I guess it doesn't matter.

I was trying to learn the chords for Piano Man by Billy Joel, and there are some slash chords like F/C, or Dm7/C. Can somebody please explain to me how this works?
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Quote by theogonia777
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#2
Bass note is altered to the added note, like:

You have a C Chord, C E G, C/F alters the bass note, F E G.
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#3
A F/C for example, you would play an F chord with a C base note rather than an F base note. If you are playing with a bass player it isn't a big deal because they will get the C, and you can just play a normal F.
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#4
Slash chords tell you to play a different note as the bass, instead of the root. The note before the slash is the chord you play, and the note after the slash is the bass you play with it. So, for a C/F, you play a C chord with an F as the bass; for a Dm7/C you play a Dm7 chord with a C as the bass.
#5
Quote by Gakbez
Bass note is altered to the added note, like:

You have a C Chord, C E G, C/F alters the bass note, F E G.

well, there is still a C in there, it doesn't get taken out
like a D/F# would be played like

e-2
b-3
g-2
D-0
A-x
E-2 <-- F# as the lowest note
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#7
So if I played an C/G, then what would I do? Because G is part of the C major triad, how would I play that?
Call me Andrew. It's my name.

Quote by theogonia777
i fond God too, man! i sat next to him on the bus once. he told be the meaning of life and then gave me a pretzel. i can't remember what the meaning of live was, but it was a good pretzel, man!
#8
Play your C chord, but also add the G lower than the C root. If you were to play a different voicing with multiple C's, for example on guitar where most chords have each tone in several octaves, you could drop the root C note entirely and play the G. I don't play piano, but here's a keyboard...well, picture, of it.

edit forgot link, I'm dumb: http://www.shanemcdonald.org/music/piano-chord-C-with-G-Bass.html
Last edited by morrock at Nov 21, 2009,
#9
Quote by GoIrish668
So if I played an C/G, then what would I do? Because G is part of the C major triad, how would I play that?


Instead of playing the C (3rd fret of the A string), you would put your ring finger on the G (3rd fret of the low E string) to get a C/G chord. It would look like this:

e|---0---|
B|---1---| I
G|---0---|
D|---2---| M
A|---3---| P
E|---3---| R

Basically a slash chord is where you take a note out of a triad amd take the note that isn't the root (such as an E or G in a C major triad) and play it as the bass (lowest) note of the chord. Hope I helped.
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#10
Quote by Gakbez
Bass note is altered to the added note, like:

You have a C Chord, C E G, C/F alters the bass note, F E G.


WRONG!


Well, I saw a few posts explaining it correctly, but...


It's an inversion. That means when you have a chord with a slash note, you play that chord with the slash note in the bottom(lowest/bass). Usually, that slash note is one of the notes of the chord that you're using. So, if you have C/G, that means play the C chord but the lowest note that you going to include must be G.

So, a C/G chord would look like this,

in standard tuning, 332010

Another example,

Dm7/C -

X30211
#11
^ You should 1 2 3 4 for left hand fingerings. I M R P will get confused with P I M A C which is used for right hand fingering.

Slash chords - Play the chord that's before the slash, and the lowest note has to be the note after the slash (even if its not in the original chord). Usually the bass player will get the second note, and you can just play the chord.
#12
Okay, just to clarify.

A C/F chord is: C E F G

A C/G chord is: G C E G (the first G being below the other three)
Call me Andrew. It's my name.

Quote by theogonia777
i fond God too, man! i sat next to him on the bus once. he told be the meaning of life and then gave me a pretzel. i can't remember what the meaning of live was, but it was a good pretzel, man!
#13
Quote by GoIrish668
Okay, just to clarify.

A C/F chord is: C E F G

A C/G chord is: G C E G (the first G being below the other three)


No.

C/F is a C chord (C E and G) voiced however you wish (other than the bass note), with an F as the lowest note played (even though it is normally in the chord.

C/G is a C chord (C E and G) voiced however you wish (other than the bass note), with an G as the lowest note played
#14
So then it is:

C/F: F C E G (with the C E and G being put in whatever order I wish.

C/G: G C E G (with the last three notes being voiced however I wish.
Call me Andrew. It's my name.

Quote by theogonia777
i fond God too, man! i sat next to him on the bus once. he told be the meaning of life and then gave me a pretzel. i can't remember what the meaning of live was, but it was a good pretzel, man!
#15
Quote by GoIrish668
So then it is:

C/F: F C E G (with the C E and G being put in whatever order I wish.

C/G: G C E G (with the last three notes being voiced however I wish.


Yes. Its not complicated at all. Play a C chord, and the lowest note has to be an F or G respectively.