#1
1. Currently, I can only read notation competently in open, 2nd, 5th and 7th positions. How important is it to be able to red music in the other positions?

2. What is the best way to learn chords? Also, when learning chords is it important to learn all the inversions?

3. What is the best way to memorize/learn all the keys?

On the previous 2, I was considering picking up Al Di Meola's book.

http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/2951867

However it seems an extremely systematic approach.

Thanks
#2
Quote by Tom-sawyer

How important is it to be able to red music in the other positions?


Not that important if you dont need to. But i recommend to learn all postitions.

Quote by Tom-sawyer

2. What is the best way to learn chords? Also, when learning chords is it important to learn all the inversions?


Know how to construct chords and know your fretboard. If you know these two, you dont have to learn the inversions, you can simply apply them.

Quote by Tom-sawyer

3. What is the best way to memorize/learn all the keys?


Practice, practice and practice.

Did i mention practice? No, then practice.
#3
To learn your keys why dont you learn the order of your sharps and flats.

Sharps ascend in 5ths. FCGDAEB
Father Charles Goes Down And Ends Battle

Flats ascend in 4th. BEADGCF
Same sentence as above but in reverse.

When you look at a key signature of sharps, look at the last sharp and go up one semitone. That gives you the name of the major key. Go down three semitones from this name to get the relative minor key.

When looking at a key of flats look at the penultimate flat and thats the major key. Again go back 3 semitones to get the name of the minor key.
#4
Quote by richrowley
To learn your keys why dont you learn the order of your sharps and flats.

Sharps ascend in 5ths. FCGDAEB
Father Charles Goes Down And Ends Battle

Flats ascend in 4th. BEADGCF
Same sentence as above but in reverse.

When you look at a key signature of sharps, look at the last sharp and go up one semitone. That gives you the name of the major key. Go down three semitones from this name to get the relative minor key.

When looking at a key of flats look at the penultimate flat and thats the major key. Again go back 3 semitones to get the name of the minor key.


I guess I should study the Circle of 5ths more :P

Dehufter, I'm aware of how to construct most chords, but even then it's difficult applying them to accessible fingerings. Should I just suck it up and spend the time it takes, or learn the fingerings from an outside source?

Cheers.
#5
Quote by Tom-sawyer
I guess I should study the Circle of 5ths more :P

Dehufter, I'm aware of how to construct most chords, but even then it's difficult applying them to accessible fingerings. Should I just suck it up and spend the time it takes, or learn the fingerings from an outside source?

Cheers.


I'd advise you to play around with chords, and find your own voicings. You'll get more out of it, even if you end up with some voicings that you could've found elsewhere. It'll really help to be able to quckly find a chord from seeing its name. Especially considering you don't want to memorize 4 inversion on 4 different sets of strings for maj7♯9 chords (and all the other obscure chords which almost never come up).


As for sight reading, I wouldn't advise you to learn to play in X position. Once you've got some basics, just pick the best fingering, regardless off position. Knowing every 2 or 3 positions would mean you know where all the notes are anyways. Its just a matter of playing the seventh fret with your middle finger instead of your ring finger, for 'other positions'. The actual position itself isn't all that important.
#6
Quote by isaac_bandits
I'd advise you to play around with chords, and find your own voicings. You'll get more out of it, even if you end up with some voicings that you could've found elsewhere. It'll really help to be able to quckly find a chord from seeing its name. Especially considering you don't want to memorize 4 inversion on 4 different sets of strings for maj7♯9 chords (and all the other obscure chords which almost never come up).


As for sight reading, I wouldn't advise you to learn to play in X position. Once you've got some basics, just pick the best fingering, regardless off position. Knowing every 2 or 3 positions would mean you know where all the notes are anyways. Its just a matter of playing the seventh fret with your middle finger instead of your ring finger, for 'other positions'. The actual position itself isn't all that important.


identifying intervals between strings/frets will also help with chord construction on the fly. If you know that the next string up and one fret back is a major third, and you know you need a major interval from the root in your chord, there's your note. Same with any interval you'll need to voice chords.