#1
What key is Sweet Child O' Mine in?

I think its D (or Db because its half-step down) as the first note of SCOM is a D and the first chord is a D major.

If I am wrong, please tell me why and what key its in.

I am writing my own music, I read up about keys. just need to incorporate them into my music, just need a bit of help on this please.
#2
Except for the solo, which is in Em (or Ebm if you prefer) yes, it is in D(Db).
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#4
You're right, it depends on the tuning.

if you tune to Eb standard, it's in Db major. If you wanted to study the piece with that key signature, you'd look for five flats (Db, Eb, Gb, Ab, Bb). If you tune to E standard, you're playing it in D major; look out for two sharps (F and C). It doesn't have much chromaticism, so you won't have any problem identifying the chords used within the keys mentioned above. The first few chords of the introductory lead guitar music are the "Primary Chords", in actual fact. These chords are (in ANY key) I, IV and V (one, four and five). In the case of D major, these are:

I - D major (D, F sharp, A)
IV - G Major (G, B, D)
V - A Major (A, F sharp, E)

*NOT STRICTLY IN THIS ORDER*

Try to look for these patterns and shapes in the tablature or music.

We could then go into the topic of cadences, or cadential points, but that's probably a little excessive for what you want to know!

I really hope this has helped you.

- Adam
Last edited by Dante53 at Nov 22, 2009,
#5
I believe its in Gb.
and the chord progression is like V-IV-I-V and the solo changes to the minor tone(dunno what its called in english) of Gb, thats Ebm.

One day you`re gonna wake up and you`ll be 30 years old and you won`t have done a damn thing with your life.
#6
It's written in D with a b7. I would be tempted to say that the verses are in D Mixolydian but I'm sure somebody would pull me up on that. Chorus has a chromatic C# in the A chord and the solo and outro modulates to Em, because Slash can't play in any other key. Note that the notes of E minor and D mixolydian are the same.
#7
I notice that the first solo of Sweet Child O' Mine begins with an A, wont that mean the solo for this part of the song is in a different key because the tonic note is an A?
#8
no, the starting note of a solo has nothing to do with the tonic. The tonic is where it resolves - usually the last chord.
#9
Quote by Declan87
no, the starting note of a solo has nothing to do with the tonic. The tonic is where it resolves - usually the last chord.


Don't you mean the key of the song is determined by the first chord of the song? Because how do we know if a chord has resolved without knowing the tonic?
#10
Quote by Nitro89
Don't you mean the key of the song is determined by the first chord of the song? Because how do we know if a chord has resolved without knowing the tonic?
Sound and context clues. For example, if you have Am D7, it's fairly safe to say that's going to resolve to G, as a ii V7 I progression is a very common turnaround in jazz/blues. If it went Am D7 C, it would be safe to say that it's not resolved. It will feel incomplete, whereas the ii V7 I will have a strong release of tension.

Also, you can have progressions and melodies that don't start or end on the tonic. Sometimes songs end "unresolved," usually on the IV or V, but sometimes on some strange/out of key chords.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Nov 28, 2009,
#11
The majority of the song is in Db major, the key changes to Eb minor during the solo portion.
#12
so you're saying there is no proper way that will work 100% to identify what key a song is in?
#13
Quote by Nitro89
so you're saying there is no proper way that will work 100% to identify what key a song is in?
No, I'm not. Sorry if I confused you. You'll be able to hear if a song ends unresolved. If it ends resolved you should be able to tell.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#14
Quote by food1010
No, I'm not. Sorry if I confused you. You'll be able to hear if a song ends unresolved. If it ends resolved you should be able to tell.


But what if a song is left unresolved, how would you know what key the song is in? You could only really make assumptions can't you? Unresolved songs end in V chord progression so you could figure it that way.
#15
Quote by Nitro89
But what if a song is left unresolved, how would you know what key the song is in? You could only really make assumptions can't you? Unresolved songs end in V chord progression so you could figure it that way.
Go to around 7:52 in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KrY_3_6fsjM. Howard Goodall uses "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen" as an example so you can hear the modulation between minor and relative major (Em and G to be specific). You can hear by the context of the song which note each section is centered around, even though the key signature doesn't change at all, it remains simply as one sharp. You have to rely on your ear and context clues to tell what note will resolve that specific section of the song.

Disclaimer: Most songs don't modulate between relative keys, but that's an example which juxtaposes the two, so I felt that it was a good example.

Here are two examples. Both start and end on C, but one is in the key of C and the other is not. Neither of them have any sharps or flats, but the key is implied by the sound of it. Play them on guitar or piano or whatever instrument you play/have at hand and see if you can tell which is which.

C F Dm C
C F Am C
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Nov 29, 2009,
#16
Personally, the Dm and Am chords in both sequences seem out of place.

But if I had to pick, I'd say C F Am C belongs to the key of C major.
#17
I think the song is in Gb Major/Eb Minor but starts on the D due to it being modal. Solo is pretty much in Eb minor.

This is all due to it being tuned down of course.
#18
Quote by Nitro89
Personally, the Dm and Am chords in both sequences seem out of place.

But if I had to pick, I'd say C F Am C belongs to the key of C major.
Hm, maybe those were bad examples. I was thinking the other way around. I was thinking the first one was a I IV ii I resolution which made a lot more sense to me than a V I vi V (I). I was thinking the second one was a V I iii V (I).



Come to think of it, those were terrible examples. Both of them make much more sense in the key of F than in C.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Nov 29, 2009,
#19
I referred back to my book and they both come under the Major Key chord progression, I thought they did, but yeah the neither of them sound good.
#20
Quote by Nitro89
I referred back to my book and they both come under the Major Key chord progression, I thought they did, but yeah the neither of them sound good.
Yeah I was kinda trying to make them both fit into F, C, Am, and Dm (as well as the modes of these keys) and I was trying to have you find out which it fit best, but it was a bad example. Sorry.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#21
avery5150 gotta stop you there. In the key of db major you don't have a cb major (the chords of the verse are ( db-cb-gb) - it looks like it's in db mixolydian
#22
Quote by MitchCaluori
avery5150 gotta stop you there. In the key of db major you don't have a cb major (the chords of the verse are ( db-cb-gb) - it looks like it's in db mixolydian

Ever heard of chord borrowing?

Also, the thread is 7 years old and I'm pretty sure TS already knows what key the song is in.
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