#1
Here it is guys, my practice regime. Tell me what's good and what sucks!

1) Knowing the Instrument

- Going up and down the fretboard identifying all the natural notes (E, F, G, A etc) on each string, and then moving down. (I have E strings dialed, and A is starting to solidify as well)
- Memorising modes, playing back on guitar pro (so I'm sort of working on speed as well). Again, only moving onto next one when I have the previous ones memorised (where I'm at now is looping Ionian, Dorian and Phrygian).

2) Technical Exercises

- Taking some scale fragments out of John Petrucci's Rock Discipline and running through them with a metronome, normally ones incorporating string skipping or position changes, working up from an easy speed to a speed where it's only just comfortable
- Sweep Picking: At the moment I'm just taking 3 note per string arpeggio shapes and playing them at a comfortable speed. Further on I will speed them up, add more strings, and then when that becomes too easy, put in string skipping, hammerons and shit.
- Legato: Going through the some legato scale fragments in the Rock Discipline book, at a speed where everything is crystal clear.

3) Ear Training

- Do 5 minutes of recognising intervals on http://www.teoria.com/exercises/

4) Song Practice

- At the moment, I'm learning Seek and Destroy. Although the riffs are probably below my current ability (and the solo WAAAY above), it's a nice well known song I can play at my uni's jam group.
- Also learning Hallowed Be Thy Name. That song is pushing me more (again, not going onto solo's yet.

5) Theory

HMMM NOT SURE HOW TO PRACTICE THIS YET! (although there are some overlaps with the fretboard and mode stuff).


Cheers in advance for the advice!!

Fraser
Last edited by Fraserwatt at Nov 23, 2009,
#2
That seems like a decent schedule, but i'd include some relaxed playing as well, so you can also enjoy the skills and songs you've learned so far. Maybe you're already doing that besides this schedule, but that's the only suggestion I can give.
#3
Quote by Equivalence
That seems like a decent schedule, but i'd include some relaxed playing as well, so you can also enjoy the skills and songs you've learned so far. Maybe you're already doing that besides this schedule, but that's the only suggestion I can give.



Yeah, the song practice is like my relaxed playing time. Chillout with Maiden, Relax with Metallica, thats how I roll. Also when I'm just randomly noodling about, thats pretty relaxing.
#4
Do you really sit down and follow that schedule? I mean, it sounds like a good idea and all, but I could just never make myself do that. I end up just going wherever my ?fingers? take me.
Then again, that's probably just me, because I don't work well on a schedule ANYWHERE.
#5
Quote by IROn 5L1nKY
Do you really sit down and follow that schedule? I mean, it sounds like a good idea and all, but I could just never make myself do that. I end up just going wherever my ?fingers? take me.
Then again, that's probably just me, because I don't work well on a schedule ANYWHERE.

+1

I practice what I'm in the mood to practice, haha. Otherwise everything I practice pretty much bleeds out of my ears and I forget everything. But still, your schedule is probably working well for you.
#6
There's absolutely no point having modes anywhere near your practice schedule at this stage, you're neither in a position to understand them or make any use of them....just focus on the major scale for the time being.

Remember, scales ARE theory...the technical aspects of a scale (patterns and positions) are inseparable from the musical function of everything that makes up that scale, notes, intervals, sound. If you're just running through scale patterns without paying attention to the notes, intervals and how that scale works and how you can use it...well, you're not really learning anything at all.
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Nov 22, 2009,
#7
Quote by steven seagull
There's absolutely no point having modes anywhere near your practice schedule at this stage, you're neither in a position to understand them or make any use of them....just focus on the major scale for the time being.

Remember, scales ARE theory...the technical aspects of a scale (patterns and positions) are inseparable from the musical function of everything that makes up that scale, notes, intervals, sound. If you're just running through scale patterns without paying attention to the notes, intervals and how that scale works and how you can use it...well, you're not really learning anything at all.


Ahhh! This is good!! So, if I were to scrap my mode stuff, and just work out and play through where the scale would be in say (for example) the key of G Major, that this would be far more benificial? Any other exercises (what did YOU do when you were learning? what should you have done in retrospect? what shouldn't you have done?)
#8
Thing is every major scale is the same, just played in a different place - if you understand it in one key then you understand it in all of them. The biggest mistake I made was not learning theory early enough, and I don't mean anything particularly complicated either...just the basics of the major scale, knowing where the notes are on the fretboard, chord construction etc. A good guideline to follow is simply to make a point of trying to understand everything you learn, so if you learn a chord learn the notes it contains and how it's constructed, if you learn a song learn to recognise the chords that may be hidden in there.

Also try not to compartmentalise so much, guitar isn't in sections really, it's just one big thing. For example ear training, you wouldn't just do 5 minutes of it, but arguably ear training is part and parcel of everything you do on guitar anyway. Whatever it is you're playing or practicing you should be listening to see if it sounds right, listening how notes interact with each other, making an effort to mentally associate the actions you're performing with the sound you're creating. The more you do that the better you'll understand how and why the guitar works the way it does, and that in turn will allow you to have more control over what comes out of it.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
Last edited by steven seagull at Nov 22, 2009,
#9
Quote by steven seagull
A good guideline to follow is simply to make a point of trying to understand everything you learn, so if you learn a chord learn the notes it contains and how it's constructed, if you learn a song learn to recognise the chords that may be hidden in there.


Ahh, will do from now on (including the song's I'm getting up to speed at the moment!

Quote by steven seagull
Thing is every major scale is the same, just played in a different place - if you understand it in one key then you understand it in all of them. The biggest mistake I made was not learning theory early enough, and I don't mean anything particularly complicated either...just the basics of the major scale, knowing where the notes are on the fretboard, chord construction etc.


So how would the best way to learn this be?

Scale patterns? (I'm thinking that patterns are more short term learning, and aren't greatly applicable in the bigger picture, but I could be wrong)
Learn the formula and then apply it up and down a string?
#11
Quote by Fraserwatt
So how would the best way to learn this be?

Scale patterns? (I'm thinking that patterns are more short term learning, and aren't greatly applicable in the bigger picture, but I could be wrong)
Learn the formula and then apply it up and down a string?
Learn the major scale so you understand how its constructed - scale patterns are great, but they are only really useful if you understand where they come from.

Learn the major scale in terms of steps (WWHWWWH), intervals (Root, Maj 2nd, Maj 3rd, Perfect 4th etc) and notes (eg G Maj = G A B C D E F#), then if you want to use patterns draw them out yourself from your understanding of the scale so you can see exactly where they come from, what intervals are where, where all the root notes are etc. Learn to recognise the sound of the scale, learn to play it in any direction (single string, 3nps, diagonally etc) starting from anywhere on the neck, and learn to use it
#12
Quote by zhilla
Learn the major scale so you understand how its constructed - scale patterns are great, but they are only really useful if you understand where they come from.

Learn the major scale in terms of steps (WWHWWWH), intervals (Root, Maj 2nd, Maj 3rd, Perfect 4th etc) and notes (eg G Maj = G A B C D E F#), then if you want to use patterns draw them out yourself from your understanding of the scale so you can see exactly where they come from, what intervals are where, where all the root notes are etc. Learn to recognise the sound of the scale, learn to play it in any direction (single string, 3nps, diagonally etc) starting from anywhere on the neck, and learn to use it

Ahhh, this post alone has already boosted my improv. as in I actually know what I'm doing now, although I'm keeping it 1 string improv at the moment, occasionally branching off to other strings IF i know which notes to hit. Sounding a lot better, definitely something to practice.


Depending on how much I get for my student loan / if I'm able to get a job next semester, I think I'm going to go for some guitar lessons. The guidance, mentoring and the "try it like *this*" factors cannot be acquired from DVDs / websites. Now that I'm not living in my pokey little market town, theres more choice when it comes to teachers as well.

Got a couple of questions on the subject, but it's really too small a point for a new thread, might as well just put it in this thread (as i DO already have this bookmarked and subscribed to)
- Any tips on looking for a suitable teacher?
- Any stuff that I might as well make sure I have TOTALLY nailed down as not to spend valuable lesson time going over stuff which I could have easily got down in the next 2 months?

Cheers, all the help so far has been incredible!

Fraser
#13
My grandfather would say: "I'm going upstairs to fuck your grandmother". He was an honest man, and he wasn't going to bullshit a four-year-old.

-Carlin
#14
Quote by Fraserwatt

Depending on how much I get for my student loan / if I'm able to get a job next semester, I think I'm going to go for some guitar lessons. The guidance, mentoring and the "try it like *this*" factors cannot be acquired from DVDs / websites. Now that I'm not living in my pokey little market town, theres more choice when it comes to teachers as well.



Yeah, that's really what I look for from teachers. I first got a teacher after I failed at teaching myself from books, websites, etc. He taught me a bit about theory because most music theory articles at the time were tldred. I was with him for a month, and he was a great teacher and a very good influence on me. He taught me some easy licks that built up my chops to the point where I could go to more complicated things, and gave me a basic foundation of music theory to where I could read books that I considered verbose at the time. About a year later I hit a wall, and went back to him for about two months or so...pretty much the same thing happened. It took a few lessons for him to understand where I was in my playing (after all it had been a ****ing year since I last saw him) and he helped me get to another level. When I started writing my own stuff I also went to him because I found my progressions to be stale and weak...he helped me there too. During the year or so off I took from him I bought about 12 or so different pieces of guitar literature, so I had everything explained in quite a few different ways.



Got a couple of questions on the subject, but it's really too small a point for a new thread, might as well just put it in this thread (as i DO already have this bookmarked and subscribed to)
- Any tips on looking for a suitable teacher?


Music stores, preferably not a big store like The Guitar Center but smaller shops. I'd go to your school's music department (if they have one) and ask around if they know if anyone who could help you out. I'd look for an older guy too, someone who knows their shit and has practiced a lot. A younger kid is fine for someone whose just learning, but you seem to know a bit about music as it is and would require someone who has been around the block a few times and knows common mistakes and several ways of explaining different concepts/techniques. A guy that's comfortable teaching theory and technique, as opposed to just songs, is a good thing too.



- Any stuff that I might as well make sure I have TOTALLY nailed down as not to spend valuable lesson time going over stuff which I could have easily got down in the next 2 months?



21 basic chords (Majors/Minors/7ths), the major scale, the minor scale, a few modes, harmonic minor, a few different barre chords, pentatonic box, knowing the steps between different notes, basic shit like that. Several riffs/licks (Sandman, Smoke, Sweet Child, Back in Black, Heartbreaker, Symphony of Destruction, Wonderwall, Ain't Talkin Bout Love, etc) just to show him that you can play like songs and stuff.
My grandfather would say: "I'm going upstairs to fuck your grandmother". He was an honest man, and he wasn't going to bullshit a four-year-old.

-Carlin
#15
Quote by Fraserwatt
Ahhh, this post alone has already boosted my improv. as in I actually know what I'm doing now, although I'm keeping it 1 string improv at the moment, occasionally branching off to other strings IF i know which notes to hit. Sounding a lot better, definitely something to practice.
Glad it helped Don't forget to change keys regularly - I fell into the trap of sticking to my 'comfy' key for too long, and when I tried to change i realised I'd come to rely on my fret markers to know where in the scale I was. If you change keys regularly you use your ear more, and you start to recognise where notes are in relation to each other, whihc makes life a whole lot easier


Quote by Fraserwatt
- Any tips on looking for a suitable teacher?
- Any stuff that I might as well make sure I have TOTALLY nailed down as not to spend valuable lesson time going over stuff which I could have easily got down in the next 2 months?
Ask around. Find out who other guitarists recommend, find out who the music shops recommend, find out who works the local schools if you can. Then talk to the prospective teachers you shortlist from other peoples recommendations, tell them what your goals are and ask them how they can help you reach those goals. After that go with the one you feel most comfortable about. Keep the details of the others in case you want to change for any reason.


I'd say learn the notes of the neck if you haven't already, and try and get your major scale nailed so you understand it, and recognise the sound of it. Understanding the major scale gives you a really good baseline for understanding all other scales, arpeggios and chord construction. I wouldn't worry too much about other scales until you have the major scale nailed, as they will be so much easier when you can relate them to something you already know well.

Refresh yourself on your open chords and barre chords. I wouldn't worry too much about learning new ones - just make sure you know the ones you've already learnt really well, and are comfortable changing between them.

And know what you want from your teacher, so you can tell them what your goals are. They can't help you meet them if they don't know what they are