#1
well, i learned today that suspended chords are root, P4, and P5 (usually)
and i tried learning a simple c one but im not 100 % sure if its right.

i do it like this
x33011

am i doing it right?
Classical Guitarist
#2
Yes, that is a Csus4.

You can also get suspended chords which include the 3rd as long as the 3rd is in a higher octave, so like x33010, which can give a jazzier sound if you want. (It's in the Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine under suspended chords incase anybody (and I would predict it) wishes to disagree). But you are right, I only mention that incase you want to muck around with the sound.
#3
Quote by Sam_Vimes
Yes, that is a Csus4.

You can also get suspended chords which include the 3rd as long as the 3rd is in a higher octave, so like x33010, which can give a jazzier sound if you want. (It's in the Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine under suspended chords incase anybody (and I would predict it) wishes to disagree). But you are right, I only mention that incase you want to muck around with the sound.


If a chord contains a third, it is not suspended. Example: C E F G is Cadd11, not Csus4. Even if the E note is 4 octaves above everything else.
#4
Quote by Sam_Vimes
Yes, that is a Csus4.

You can also get suspended chords which include the 3rd as long as the 3rd is in a higher octave, so like x33010, which can give a jazzier sound if you want. (It's in the Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine under suspended chords incase anybody (and I would predict it) wishes to disagree). But you are right, I only mention that incase you want to muck around with the sound.

Sounds like a book I need to read, I was going to disagree like a motherbitch
Then again my theory knowledge is pretty useless
ohai little sig.
#6
If a chord contains a third, it is not suspended. Example: C E F G is Cadd11, not Csus4. Even if the E note is 4 octaves above everything else.


Hey, I quoted my sources. Disagree if you want, but if you check, it is in there. I'm not intending on arguing the point, disregard it if you want, or check the book if you're interested... I'm not fussed.
#7
Quote by Sam_Vimes
Hey, I quoted my sources. Disagree if you want, but if you check, it is in there. I'm not intending on arguing the point, disregard it if you want, or check the book if you're interested... I'm not fussed.


That's what he defines as a 'jazz sus chord', if I'm not mistaken. In common music nomenclature, however, a suspended chord is one where the third is omitted and replaced by a not a half step higher (usually in a major chord) or lower (usually in a minor chord) and then resolved by a half step.
#9
I agree with that. I wasn't reinventing the wheel... just thought it was an interesting and relevant thing to mention.