#1
Hey Musician Talk, I need some help.

You see, I'm just not getting really serious about my guitar plaiying. I've been on and off in the past two years of my playing, and am just now getting serious. I've improved quite a bit over a month, but now I've kind of hit a road block. I really don't know what to practic. I'm trying to formulate a practice plan that will help me develop technical skill, as well as develop a sense of what sounds "good" improv wise, as I'm not really a monster at improv. I'm trying to develop shred skills and rhythym skills on the technical side, can you recommend any good drills?

Also I was debating getting a teacher, is it really worth the money? And, does it really produce the results it supposedly does?

Thanks in advance
#2
Most people will say its worth the money to get a teacher, but I find teachers always want to divert your focus to theirs. Have you memorized all your diatonic scales? your modes? the notes on the fret? the petatonic? Have you learned pinch harmonics? tapping? sweep picking? If you want to be a great shredder you should know all these things (most importantly the scales) Learn these at whatever pace you want and learn them by what interest you the most and I promise you will become a awesum shredder with out a teacher.
#3
You can always search the lessons on UG. I have found some to be rele helpful. I suggest trying to learn Canon Rock by Jerry C. Youtube "guitar" and you should find it. It is pretty simple in the sense that it has multiple techniques used (sweep picking, tremolo picking, pinch harmonics)
#4
Quote by Natekicksbut
Most people will say its worth the money to get a teacher, but I find teachers always want to divert your focus to theirs. Have you memorized all your diatonic scales? your modes? the notes on the fret? the petatonic? Have you learned pinch harmonics? tapping? sweep picking? If you want to be a great shredder you should know all these things (most importantly the scales) Learn these at whatever pace you want and learn them by what interest you the most and I promise you will become a awesum shredder with out a teacher.


No sadly; I'm a theory noob. But, I'll def get in to it. Thanks for the help, man?

Any practice tips?
#5
Quote by Faded Grey
No sadly; I'm a theory noob. But, I'll def get in to it. Thanks for the help, man?

Any practice tips?

Just be mellow and practise hard theres no reall tips:P
#6
Listen to a lot of guitar heavy music with skilled guitarists, I find that sort of inspires me.
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#7
If you can find a good teacher they are definitely worth the money. I'd happily pay a heck of a lot more than I do for my teacher. I don't have to waste time working out what to learn next - he tells me. I don't have to waste time researching how to do stuff once I've worked out what to learn - he shows me. I don't have to spend ages slowly working out what I'm doing wrong - he points out what I'm doing wrong before it can become a habit. I don't have to worry about missing anything fundamental out because he knows what I need to cover, and he presents stuff to me in a logical order and doesn't miss stuff out. If I have a question I can get an answer on the spot. I would suck without my teacher - at least compared to where I am now.

If you can afford it, and can find a good one, I would definitely recommend getting a teacher.
#8
Quote by Natekicksbut
Just be mellow and practise hard theres no reall tips:P


This guy has something against structure. "be mellow" doesn't help someone become a good player. You can have fun, but you have to work hard to get good.

As for practice tips, I do suggest you get a teacher. If they're not teaching you what you want to learn, tell them about it. If they won't listen, get a new teacher. Having a teacher will help you learn SO much faster and more correct. When practicing alone, turn off your computer, tv, everything that will be a distraction. Especially UG. Practice time should be about practicing. Go ahead and surf UG or the net, or tv, if you're just noodling around. But if you're actually practicing, that's the only thing you need to be concerned about at that moment.
#9
Quote by timeconsumer09
This guy has something against structure. "be mellow" doesn't help someone become a good player. You can have fun, but you have to work hard to get good.

As for practice tips, I do suggest you get a teacher. If they're not teaching you what you want to learn, tell them about it. If they won't listen, get a new teacher. Having a teacher will help you learn SO much faster and more correct. When practicing alone, turn off your computer, tv, everything that will be a distraction. Especially UG. Practice time should be about practicing. Go ahead and surf UG or the net, or tv, if you're just noodling around. But if you're actually practicing, that's the only thing you need to be concerned about at that moment.


LOL i do have something against structure. And being mellow does make you a better guitarist. You cant be creative when your mindset is rigid. And treating his practise time as a time for him to explore the guitar rather than memorizing it, will help insure he allways loves his practise time and playing. The greatest guitarist wernt stuido muscians who just sat there endleslly practising. The greatest guitarist were mellowed out hippies. Jimi Hendrix, Carlos Santana, Jimmy Page, Alvan Lee. All of those greats, had a playful creative nature to their music which set it apart from everyone else. If you dont love and enjoy everything you ar doing it will show.
#10
Quote by Natekicksbut
LOL i do have something against structure. And being mellow does make you a better guitarist. You cant be creative when your mindset is rigid. And treating his practise time as a time for him to explore the guitar rather than memorizing it, will help insure he allways loves his practise time and playing. The greatest guitarist wernt stuido muscians who just sat there endleslly practising. The greatest guitarist were mellowed out hippies. Jimi Hendrix, Carlos Santana, Jimmy Page, Alvan Lee. All of those greats, had a playful creative nature to their music which set it apart from everyone else. If you dont love and enjoy everything you ar doing it will show.


First, keep your subjective opinions of 'greatest' guitarists to the side. I don't really like any of those guitarists, except maybe some Jimi. I like structure to my music. And yes, studio musicians are fantastic musicians. That's why they have the jobs they have. They're flexible and talented musically. And who says you can't enjoy structure and playing accurately? I practice my instrument 5 hours a day, chunking out etudes and solo literature. Does that mean I'm a bad musician, because I don't just noodle all day?
#11
Quote by timeconsumer09
First, keep your subjective opinions of 'greatest' guitarists to the side. I don't really like any of those guitarists, except maybe some Jimi. I like structure to my music. And yes, studio musicians are fantastic musicians. That's why they have the jobs they have. They're flexible and talented musically. And who says you can't enjoy structure and playing accurately? I practice my instrument 5 hours a day, chunking out etudes and solo literature. Does that mean I'm a bad musician, because I don't just noodle all day?

LOLZ at i like structure to my music. Theres a million guitarist out their who can shred at 200 bpm and have every scale technique possible memorized. UG is filled with them. And yes their good guitarist. But what sepparates the truly great guitarist from the good, isnt technical skill. Its creativity. Otherwise every studio muscian would be rich and famous. Treating guitar like math hw and creating a heavily structred regiment to practise will not cultivate your creative side. To be great you have to create orginality.
And on a side note, anything not regimented is noodling LOL?!. Your to funny. Why not just practise things that inspire you, interest you, which you enjoy until your bored with them and than practise something else. This isnt noodeling, its just good practise. And practise which will help ensure you love what your doing for decades to come.
#12
Quote by Natekicksbut
LOLZ at i like structure to my music. Theres a million guitarist out their who can shred at 200 bpm and have every scale technique possible memorized. UG is filled with them. And yes their good guitarist. But what sepparates the truly great guitarist from the good, isnt technical skill. Its creativity. Otherwise every studio muscian would be rich and famous. Treating guitar like math hw and creating a heavily structred regiment to practise will not cultivate your creative side. To be great you have to create orginality.
And on a side note, anything not regimented is noodling LOL?!. Your to funny. Why not just practise things that inspire you, interest you, which you enjoy until your bored with them and than practise something else. This isnt noodeling, its just good practise. And practise which will help ensure you love what your doing for decades to come.


You don't get it. You can't measure greatness. Maybe I find beauty in mathematical music, like 12-tone. Maybe I want to compose and play 12-tone music on my guitar. Greatness is subjective and immeasurable.

My point is, you need some structure and discipline to develop skills. Also, I do believe that a good practice regimen will cultivate your creativity. Personally, a good practice session would include (but isn't limited to): a warmup, scale and arpeggio studies, technical studies, learning songs, listening to songs critically, ear training, and improvisation. There's plenty in there that will boost your creativity. And look! It's also a structured schedule!
#13
lmao, ok than freind. Become a great studio muscian. Focus on not what you enjoy but what feels appropriatly structured, and most educational. Im sure youl get the maximum enjoyment out of your music this way.
#14
^^^is incredibly ignorant. you won't ever be great unless you practice a lot, the best musicians of all time in my opinion (and many others) were charlie parker, dizzy gillespie, miles davis, wes montgomery, bach, debussy, randy brecker, john coltrane and bill evans and they were incredibly creative (to the point of revolutionizing music/their instrument) and are still being imitated today. they all went through a period of intense, reginmented practice and it didnt make them boring. practice is time to improve your skill or learn to music. time to create is time to create, and they both feed each other, but if you have one without the other you often get musicians who may be good (like the ones you listed are) and are certainly creative, but they are not great. besides, its hard to create musically if you cannot instantaniously transmit anything you hear (around you, in your head, etc) to your instrument.
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Nov 23, 2009,
#15
Quote by tehREALcaptain
^^^is incredibly ignorant. you won't ever be great unless you practice a lot, the best musicians of all time in my opinion (and many others) were charlie parker, dizzy gillespie, miles davis, wes montgomery, bach, debussy, randy brecker, john coltrane and bill evans and they were incredibly creative (to the point of revolutionizing music/their instrument) and are still being imitated today. they all went through a period of intense, reginmented practice and it didnt make them boring. practice is time to improve your skill or learn to music. time to create is time to create, and they both feed each other, but if you have one without the other you often get musicians who may be good (like the ones you listed are) and are certainly creative, but they are not great. besides, its hard to create musically if you cannot instantaniously transmit anything you hear (around you, in your head, etc) to your instrument.

LOL who says they didnt practise alot, Who says i dont beleive in constant practise. I practise for hours every day. Its just not regimented. Its about exploring the guitar not memorizing it. Theres nothing ignorant about beleiving practise can be natural and fun rather than a regimented form of muscial facsim lol. The ignorant one is the person who feels they should treat math and music as synonmous. The even more ignorant person is the lowely guitarist who dares to insinuate that jimi hendrix, alvan lee or jimmy page are anything less than great. You my freind will never be half the muscian that they were. You need to love your instrument and music, not worship it.
#16
they are great musicians, but they were not great guitarists (aside from jimi who may have well been just because of sheer inovation). and regimented practice does not mean you are "treating math and music as synonmous (sic)", it simply means you are getting the most out of your practice time. when i play, i try to be free and creative, and even when i practice (if i am practicing improvisation). but there is a difference between playing and practicing, playing is for enjoyment practicing (which i still find extremely enjoyable) is for improving. and of the musicians I listed miles, randy brecker (and his brother), bach, debussy and bill evans all went to school for music so its fair to assume there was a point in their lives where they did regimented practice and charlie parker and coltrane have both talked alot about how much they practiced and what they practiced.
#17
Quote by tehREALcaptain
they are great musicians, but they were not great guitarists (aside from jimi who may have well been just because of sheer inovation). and regimented practice does not mean you are "treating math and music as synonmous (sic)", it simply means you are getting the most out of your practice time. when i play, i try to be free and creative, and even when i practice (if i am practicing improvisation). but there is a difference between playing and practicing, playing is for enjoyment practicing (which i still find extremely enjoyable) is for improving. and of the musicians I listed miles, randy brecker (and his brother), bach, debussy and bill evans all went to school for music so its fair to assume there was a point in their lives where they did regimented practice and charlie parker and coltrane have both talked alot about how much they practiced and what they practiced.

All I am saying freind, is give peace a chance. No hah not really. No all all i am saying is that practise and regiment dont have to be synonmous. Lets say you just heard an amazing song. Learn it. Get bored halfway through who cares, practise your scales until you feel like learning the rest of the song. Well practising the scales why not practise phrasing. Youl cultivate your creative side while practising and do what your interested in. Learn what you want to learn not what you ought to learn and your love for your instrument will only ever grow. As well as your creativity. Attitude matters. And as far as great guitarist goes: Jimi hendrix was a great guitarist because of his innovation and uniqueness. No one has or will ever sound akin to Jimmy. Jimi and Pages riffs were: playful, energetic, fun and make no mistake technically difficult. They truly loved their music and it showed. It may be difficult to learn all the common scales, modes techniques as well as the less common ones. It may be even more difficult to be able to play them well at 200 BPM. Yet there are thousands who have tens of thousands. Stuidio muscians are all technical geniuses. Yet guitarist like this are a dime a dozen. What will really sepparate you from the rest is originality and creativity. There are reasons bigger than people suck and money which has made guitarist like jimi hendrix and jimmy page more loved than guitarist such as yewie malstreem (sp) and alexi lahio. Love thy instrument freind.
#18
All I am saying freind, is give peace a chance. No hah not really. No all all i am saying is that practise and regiment dont have to be synonmous. Lets say you just heard an amazing song. Learn it. Get bored halfway through who cares, practise your scales until you feel like learning the rest of the song. Well practising the scales why not practise phrasing. Youl cultivate your creative side while practising and do what your interested in. Learn what you want to learn not what you ought to learn and your love for your instrument will only ever grow. As well as your creativity. Attitude matters. And as far as great guitarist goes: Jimi hendrix was a great guitarist because of his innovation and uniqueness. No one has or will ever sound akin to Jimmy. Jimi and Pages riffs were: playful, energetic, fun and make no mistake technically difficult. They truly loved their music and it showed. It may be difficult to learn all the common scales, modes techniques as well as the less common ones. It may be even more difficult to be able to play them well at 200 BPM. Yet there are thousands who have tens of thousands. Stuidio muscians are all technical geniuses. Yet guitarist like this are a dime a dozen. What will really sepparate you from the rest is originality and creativity. There are reasons bigger than people suck and money which has made guitarist like jimi hendrix and jimmy page more loved than guitarist such as yewie malstreem (sp) and alexi lahio. Love thy instrument freind.


I do love my instument, quite alot, If i didnt (and didnt enjoy practicing) I would neither play nor practice. But, to quote zoolander "you have to tame the beast before you let it out of its cage" the reason they tell you to learn "what you ought to" (which by the way consits of at most 8 or 10 different scales, but many classical virtousi only really learn four or six) is because if you do it can help deliver you to a place of no thought, where any music in your head imediatly comes out of your amp. However, to do that you must learn your scales and chords, whatever music you want and have dependable technique (sixteenth notes at 200 bpm is admirable but i would not say necesary) to get there. Also, I would argue, by regimenting your practice you apreciate cutting loose more and go farther out then you would normally (I know I do). Ive tried your way (for about 3 mediocre years), and it doesnt work for me, why don't you try mine. spend maybe three hours a day (less if you have a job, etc) on a practice schedule (still making time to play and enjoy your instrument), and see if after a week or two you dont find yourself able to do more, and thus create more. And also see if you dont apreciate cutting loose and jamming alot more.
#19
Quote by tehREALcaptain
I do love my instument, quite alot, If i didnt (and didnt enjoy practicing) I would neither play nor practice. But, to quote zoolander "you have to tame the beast before you let it out of its cage" the reason they tell you to learn "what you ought to" (which by the way consits of at most 8 or 10 different scales, but many classical virtousi only really learn four or six) is because if you do it can help deliver you to a place of no thought, where any music in your head imediatly comes out of your amp. However, to do that you must learn your scales and chords, whatever music you want and have dependable technique (sixteenth notes at 200 bpm is admirable but i would not say necesary) to get there. Also, I would argue, by regimenting your practice you apreciate cutting loose more and go farther out then you would normally (I know I do). Ive tried your way (for about 3 mediocre years), and it doesnt work for me, why don't you try mine. spend maybe three hours a day (less if you have a job, etc) on a practice schedule (still making time to play and enjoy your instrument), and see if after a week or two you dont find yourself able to do more, and thus create more. And also see if you dont apreciate cutting loose and jamming alot more.

I think we shall have to agree to disagree my freind. But on a side note I was going to make the same reverse sugestion to you. I used to very into metal, when I was i felt the same way as you. I spent 3 hours a day practising scales and modes. This deffiantly made me a better guitarist. But i realized my music and my solos just sounded like what call `wanking the guitar`every one complained my solos and music had no soul. I realized, I needed to work on creativity. Now I just practise what ever I feel will help my song writing that day not what I feel will make me a virtuoso.
#20
a. im not into metal at all.
and b. learning solos you like by ear helps alot with wanking. and 3 hours on just scales is insane.