#1
Hey guys,

I know that you should practice with a metronome etc. I know how to practice on simple REPEATING parts from songs from artists such as Paul Gilbert etc where you just alternate pick up and down over and over again. I was wondering, how would I practice it on other techniques such as legato etc. from artists such as Vai and Satriani. The notes aren't very clear on what beat they land. Any advice?

Thanks
#2
Download a guitar pro tablature with notes and do it on a backing tracks or on a metronome. It's not easy because you have to pratice more on the timing, and you have to do it because when you play in a band you can't follow another guitar like in guitar pro.
#3
Quote by rainboworiginal
Download a guitar pro tablature with notes and do it on a backing tracks or on a metronome. It's not easy because you have to pratice more on the timing, and you have to do it because when you play in a band you can't follow another guitar like in guitar pro.



Actually, that's how I practice, along with a stopwatch.

Is there a way where I can pratice with JUST a metronome?

Thanks anyway
#4
Using your hearing. You can memorize the tablature or make your own in your mind and play it on the metronome.

for example if you set the metronome on 4/4 you can play in semiquaver (1/16) and do this:

e
B
G 3h5h3p2 2h3p2p0 3h5h3p2 2h3p2p0
D
A
E
#5
You also need to learn to feel the beat. It's tough and we all have problems with it, but the more you do it the more it will come to you. An exercise I like to do with triplets is going from G#,A,B and on up the Emaj scale on the 1st string.

In a sequence of Click, G#,A,B. Click. A,B,C# and so on. Make sure you get 3 notes in between each click and make sure it's clean. If you can't play it, slow it down.

Another good thing to kill two birds with one stone is do some sight reading with it. And not tab, but actual music. It will help you tons, trust me.
#6
Be sure you can play the part or exercise at a slow tempo before you try to play it fast.

Your brain learns quick and if you practice too fast your brain will learn how to play the part wrong. Then you will have to unlearn the mistakes and relearn the the correct way. It takes three times longer.

So always start slow enough so you aren't making mistakes and speed up from there.
#7
Get a program that can slow down the song while keeping the same tonality. Then slow it down, feel the beat, and listen and play.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.