#1
I just learned the C major scale i think...The webiste i found gave me 5 patterns of the C major scale. i found another website that gave me 22 patterns of the major scale. do i need to learn them all or only 5 or neither...
#2
You need to learn as many as you want to use, a better thing to learn would actully be where all the root notes are on the fret board and what intravels are between al lthe notes compared to that root... what website did you use?
#3
You should learn all the notes all over the neck
Think not about "positions" but about the actual notes themselves and where they're found on the neck
Don't get yourself stuck in a box

EDIT
Learning positions/patterns is fine, but you want to make sure you're thinking about the notes not as "Oh this fret on this string is found in this position" but as "this note is a 'D' and 'D' is the second note in the C major scale"
Last edited by The Horror! at Nov 23, 2009,
#5
Thats all good, i actully only use two Ionian scales and then branch off from those two positions
#7
I stick to the five and that gets me buy. Move them up a little or down a little and you have modes. Leave out the the 2nd and the 6th and you have pentatonic. Leave out the 2nd, 4th, 6th, and 7th and you have triads. Add a 7th... wait! I am getting carried away!

The point is it is all relative, which is just another way of looking at music.
#9
Quote by Super Hero
I stick to the five and that gets me buy. Move them up a little or down a little and you have modes. Leave out the the 2nd and the 6th and you have pentatonic. Leave out the 2nd, 4th, 6th, and 7th and you have triads. Add a 7th... wait! I am getting carried away!

The point is it is all relative, which is just another way of looking at music.


The seven main patterns of the major scale (one with each scale degree as the lowest note) are the same as the seven patterns for the relative modes. All the notes will be the same. The modality will not be determined by the starting/ending note, but rather by the underlying harmony. The seven positions of the major scale are not the modes, rather just seven different common places to find the notes of the major scale.
#10
The major scale in any key could be described as one single pattern that covers frets 0 to 11 then repeats the same pattern from fret 12 to 23. But that's one helluva mission to learn and remember.

You can break this down into manageable chunks to make learning easier. One common method is the CAGED method. It breaks the fretboard into five basic positions. Each position overlaps the next so once you know all five and how each locks into the next then you know the major scale over the entire fretboard.

Here's an example of how the C major scale across the whole fretboard can be broken down into five "Forms". Hope it makes sense.



These shapes are "moveable" in that they can be moved to get the Major scale in different keys (E.G. shifting them all to the left two frets would give you the D Major scale). However, the shapes always fit together and overlap the same way - so if you move one you move them all.

You could break the fretboard down in many different ways some people break it down into seven patterns or more, you could come up with your own way to break it down, but the end result is the same - you want to eventually learn the major scale over the whole fretboard.

Anyway I hope it helps you understand one way those patterns are useful and what they can be used to achieve.

EDIT: - You may have learned the shapes a little different than what I have here but the principle is the same.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Nov 25, 2009,