#1
So I was going through the lessons when I ran into this section;

2.2 Table Of Intervals.


Semitones Interval
-----------------------
0 Unison
1 flat 2nd
2 2nd
3 minor 3rd
4 major 3rd
5 perfect 4th
6 flat 5th (diminished 5th or augmented 4th)
7 perfect 5th
8 minor 6th (or sharp 5th/augmented 5th)
9 major 6th
10 minor 7th (flat 7th)
11 major 7th
12 octave
13 flat 9th
14 9th
15 sharp 9th/minor 10th (just minor 3rd one octave higher)
16 major 10th (just major 3rd one octave higher)
17 11th
18 augmented 11th
19 perfect 12th (octave above perfect 5th)
20 flat 13th
21 13th

My initial statement - "WTF?!?!?!?!?"

Now I know the basics of chord creation. Use the Major Scale to determine the notes in the chord going by intervals. 1 3 5 Makes a major chord. Here I get to this interval section and I wonder "Could this be correct and if so, where am I going wrong?"

Let's try to make it simple for me, say I'm in the key of C. A 0 interval would just be C wouldn't it? But that contradicts since C is the 1st interval in the scale.......So how can 0 be an interval? And how can there be 21 intervals?
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#2
He's going by semitones. He's naming each interval as he goes up a semitone.
The 0 would be 0 (semitones) frets up from the root, therefore the 1 would be 1 semitone up from the root making it a minor 2nd.

That way seems like a bad way of learning though, try a different article like The Crusade
Also, he's wrong, there are only 7 intervals, but he listed the qualities of each one and called each an interval.
Last edited by tenfold at Nov 23, 2009,
#3
The thing you posted is a list of note names in a chord as they correspond to the root.

I think you are getting confused because they are using the word intervals in a way you arent used to.

I III and V (roman numerals 1 3 and 5) corresond to their position in the major scale I is the root III is a perfect third above it and V is a perfect fifth above it, they use the word perfect because they fir "perfectly" into the major scale.

C is the first interval on the C major scale, the guide you have explains note names that fall into the scale AND those that dont as they correspond the root C.

so there aren't 21 intervals, they are just explaining what you would call every note 21 half steps above root C in a C major chord.
#4
Quote by thegreatbuddha
The thing you posted is a list of note names in a chord as they correspond to the root.

I think you are getting confused because they are using the word intervals in a way you arent used to.

I III and V (roman numerals 1 3 and 5) corresond to their position in the major scale I is the root III is a perfect third above it and V is a perfect fifth above it, they use the word perfect because they fir "perfectly" into the major scale.

C is the first interval on the C major scale, the guide you have explains note names that fall into the scale AND those that dont as they correspond the root C.

so there aren't 21 intervals, they are just explaining what you would call every note 21 half steps above root C in a C major chord.


There is no such thing as a perfect third. E is a major third above C. Only fourths and fifths (and octaves and unisons, which aren't harmonic intervals) are called perfect. They are called perfect because they have the simplest of frequency ratios, which yield an extremely consonant "perfect" sound. The 2, 3, 6, and 7 are called major or minor; the major intervals are based off of those scale degrees' positions in the minor scale, while the minor intervals are the major interval flattened. There also exists augmented and diminished intervals; an augmented interval is one semitone sharp of a perfect or major interval, while a diminished interval is one semitone flat of a perfect or minor interval.

Also, I III and V refer to major chords built off of scale degrees 1, 3, and 5 respectively. Roman numerals indicate chords, whilst Arabic numerals (often seen with circumflexes) indicate scale degrees.


TS, these are just different measurements. You already know scale degrees, while this is intervals. Using scale degrees you assign a number to each scale degree, and that number is based only on that note, not on the others. The numbers start at 1, as they are just listing the scale degrees of a major scale, and then using accidentals infront of these numbers for other scales. Intervals are a distance between notes, rather than referring to the individual notes. This is often measured in semitones (1 fret = 1 semitone), and the names of each interval are given in that chart. There are 11 harmonic intervals (octave of the note is unimportant), and infinite melodic intervals (octave of the note is important). The name of an interval up an octave can be found by adding 7 to the name of the interval (fourth becomes eleventh, unison becomes octave, etc...). An interval requires two notes while a scale degree only requires one. You should look up theory lessons though, and ask specific questions here as that is a easier, more efficient way to learn this stuff.
#5
I wouldn't bother learning past the octave as it just repeats itself.
#6
Quote by isaac_bandits


Also, I III and V refer to major chords built off of scale degrees 1, 3, and 5 respectively. Roman numerals indicate chords, whilst Arabic numerals (often seen with circumflexes) indicate scale degrees.


Good explantion here except the roman numeral for 3 (III) doesnt give you a major chord when talking in respect of a major key. Chord 3 or lower case iii is used as it is a minor chord when built upon the 3rd degree of a major scale.
#7
^
What he said.

Capital = Major
lower case = minor

e.g - iii = minor 3rd

C major key - I - CMaj ii -Dmin iii- Emin IV- Fmaj V- G7 vi- Amin vii- Bdim
Last edited by Calibos at Nov 24, 2009,
#8
Quote by Calibos
I wouldn't bother learning past the octave as it just repeats itself.

Would be handy for naming chords, though as we usually talk about extensions as being above an octave.

(of course just add 7 to the normal number and you get the same thing up an octave)
#9
Quote by richrowley
Good explantion here except the roman numeral for 3 (III) doesnt give you a major chord when talking in respect of a major key. Chord 3 or lower case iii is used as it is a minor chord when built upon the 3rd degree of a major scale.


Since the great buddha said III, that would mean a major chord built on the third. It would have a raised third but theres nothing wrong with that.
#10
Quote by isaac_bandits
Since the great buddha said III, that would mean a major chord built on the third. It would have a raised third but theres nothing wrong with that.



especially if it's the 3rd of a minor key.
#11
Quote by The4thHorsemen
especially if it's the 3rd of a minor key.


Then it'd have to be a ♭III, and the root and fifth would be flattened rather than the third raised.
#12
Quote by isaac_bandits
Then it'd have to be a ♭III, and the root and fifth would be flattened rather than the third raised.





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