#1
Hi, fellas check this site out.


http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php


i found this when i was looking for a site that contained scales. but this site has soooo many. i was wondering which ones should be learned.
i mean i am all into blues jazz and rock music (this includes all rock music even death metal), and i am pretty sure i don't need to learn the hindustan lscale given over there. you know what i mean. So help here plz!!!
Quote by Maynard James Keenan


Cold silence has a tendency to atrophy any sense of compassion
#2
i would use the minor pentatonic scales...that's all i use and they work for everything!
MY GEAR!

Indiana IE1-TSB Electric
Kay K-592 Acousitc
Washburn XS-2 Bass
Peavey VYPYR30 with Sanpera I footswitch
Jay Turser Acoustic Electric
Paul Reed Smith (PRS) Custom SE 24 Black Cherry

www.myspace.com/12goodomens
#4
Start with the Major scale - its the simplest in terms of intervals, and pretty much any other scale you'll ever need can be derived from the Major scale.

Don't just learn to play it though - learn how its constructed in terms of steps (WWHWWWH), intervals (root, major 2nd, major 3rd, perfect 4th etc) and notes (eg G Maj = G A B C D E F#), so you really understand it, and learn to recognise the sound of it - that way you'll be able to use it as a baseline to understand pretty much any scale, arpeggio, chord or mode you need to.

Edit: Once you get the major scale nailed, learn how the natural minor is related to it, then learn how the pentatonics are related to the major and minor scales.
Last edited by zhilla at Nov 24, 2009,
#5
Zhilla, so in order to implement learning the major scale, this means I need to memorize every note on the fretboard right?
#6
Quote by Commodor 64
Zhilla, so in order to implement learning the major scale, this means I need to memorize every note on the fretboard right?

Well, not necessarily but that would certainly be the most beneficial thing to do in the long run. The other option is learning the "pattern" of the scale so to speak and you can shift that around the neck accordingly to whichever key you desire to play in.
#7
Quote by RU Experienced?
Well, not necessarily but that would certainly be the most beneficial thing to do in the long run. The other option is learning the "pattern" of the scale so to speak and you can shift that around the neck accordingly to whichever key you desire to play in.


But in order to switch it, I need to know where to start it, so I need to know the note, right?

I'm trying to actually figure out how to practice this. Everyone says learn the major scale and how it's used...OK that's fine, but it really doesn't tell me how to practice.
#8
Cough, Cough, Lydian, Mixolydian, Dorian.
[img]http://pix.motivatedphotos.com/2008/10/24/633604588429325324-annoyance.jpg[/img]

Billy Mays is definitely gonna give me nightmares now.

Quote by xxGUITARZER0xx
honestly no

but i just did the pallet town theme song cause someone wanted that

Quote by speakers
all of the above
#9
Quote by Commodor 64
But in order to switch it, I need to know where to start it, so I need to know the note, right?

I'm trying to actually figure out how to practice this. Everyone says learn the major scale and how it's used...OK that's fine, but it really doesn't tell me how to practice.


An excellent way to learn the major scales, well it worked for me anyway and everyone is different, is to make darned sure you know what each one sounds like in all the positions up and down the fretboard. Sounds like a daunting task but it really isn't. When you play the major scales sing the notes out loud as you play. That way you'll remember which notes belong to which scale. One way is to find a root note of any scale and pick that note out twice then followed by the next note, then pick out the same root note again twice, followed by the next note. This will help you to develop the aural memory necessary to recognize the root note when it is played and how it relates to the other notes played. Once you can recognize this by ear the other notes, all the way to the octave will just fill in. The brain is amazing. You will know immediately when a note doesn't fit. There are so many ways to do this it's best to get a little bit of advice then come up with your own practice plan. Good luck! Oh did I also mention this exercise will help you remember where all the notes are on the fretboard?? Also chromatic scales up and down the neck. Say the notes out loud as you play them.
____________________________________________
GEAR:

Ibanez SGT520VS Sage Series Acoustic
Yamaha FG720S-12 12 String Acoustic
Schecter C-1 Classic
Crate Flexwave FW65 Combo Amp
#10
Quote by anderseb
Cough, Cough, Lydian, Mixolydian, Dorian.
Bringing up modes isn't going to help someone that doesn't know the major scale.

Commodore - yes you need to be able to find your root note - that goes for any scale, and any chord. You can save yourself a lot of time in the long run by learning the notes of the neck. If you start with the A and E strings that'll get you going for most scales and chords for now though, and you only need to learn them up to the 12th fret, as they repeat after that. I'd just learn the natural notes (A B C D E F G) as you can easily find sharps and flats from them.

As far as practicing scales goes - imo you should get used to the sound of the scale then practice it every which way you can - single string, 2 nps, 3 nps, forwards, backwards, diagonally, in 3rds, 4ths, in any different patterns you can think of. If you don't know all the notes of the neck yet use the scale formula and intervals to help. Don't just practice it straight up and down once you know it, practice it in ways you might be able to use in a song
#11
Quote by lildude_6859
i would use the minor pentatonic scales...that's all i use and they work for everything!


+1

Although I wouldn't suggest that's all you use!

Using such a simple, five note scale allows you to place more emphasis on feel- which, I think, is ultimately more important. You can always add extra notes to imply modes if you want, but you can't really beat the pentatonic.

@KoenDercksen: It's only boring if it's played by a boring person. All you should really need to create a great solo is chord tones. Phrasing techniques such as emphasis, feel, and timing count for alot more than note choice.
#12
Quote by chainsawguitar

Phrasing techniques such as emphasis, feel, and timing count for alot more than note choice.

I disagree that phrasing is significantly more important than note choice, you can go from a root note to a minor third using slides, bends, whammy bar, legato etc but it is still going to sound like a minor third interval.

Anyway, if I had to choose some scales to get started with, I'd probably start with the minor pentatonic scale because it's probably the easiest to improvise with and get you started on. Then I'd say the major scale (reading up on a bit of theory never hurts also), then the modes of the major scale (which if you have learned the major scale in every position on the fretboard you should have no troubles with). Then because you mentioned death metal I guess you might want to get your head around the harmonic minor scale (worth learning the modes of this scale as well eg phrygian dominent) as well as the augmented and diminished scales. And lastly, because you mentioned jazz, I'd suggest the jazz melodic minor scale and learn the modes of it as well which will allow you to play over almost any chord changes.

bit of a wall, die paragraphs
^Note: Probably sarcastic
Gear
Schecter Blackjack C1-FR
Few Agile 8-strings
Ormsby Hypemachine 2014 otw!!

Carvin X-100B
axe-fx II

W.A musicians FTW
Quote by crisisinheaven
Deep*Kick. You have destroyed every concept of life I've ever had.
#13
Quote by zhilla
Bringing up modes isn't going to help someone that doesn't know the major scale.

Commodore - yes you need to be able to find your root note - that goes for any scale, and any chord. You can save yourself a lot of time in the long run by learning the notes of the neck. If you start with the A and E strings that'll get you going for most scales and chords for now though, and you only need to learn them up to the 12th fret, as they repeat after that. I'd just learn the natural notes (A B C D E F G) as you can easily find sharps and flats from them.

As far as practicing scales goes - imo you should get used to the sound of the scale then practice it every which way you can - single string, 2 nps, 3 nps, forwards, backwards, diagonally, in 3rds, 4ths, in any different patterns you can think of. If you don't know all the notes of the neck yet use the scale formula and intervals to help. Don't just practice it straight up and down once you know it, practice it in ways you might be able to use in a song


Good advice man. but are'nt there some scales that sound better on the electric rather than the acoustic and vice versa???
Quote by Maynard James Keenan


Cold silence has a tendency to atrophy any sense of compassion
#14
Quote by KoenDercksen
Very boring also ^^

Start with the major, then from that minor and it's subscales (melodic, harmonic) will follow. Also have a look at diminished, augmented...


I disagree, if you have developed good phrasing and understand the scale i.e. how the notes sound together\over different chords then it doesn't have to be at all boring. Or are you just saying it is boring because it's common? If that's the case then I still feel you are somewhat misguided.

Quote by zhilla
Start with the Major scale - its the simplest in terms of intervals, and pretty much any other scale you'll ever need can be derived from the Major scale.

Don't just learn to play it though - learn how its constructed in terms of steps (WWHWWWH), intervals (root, major 2nd, major 3rd, perfect 4th etc) and notes (eg G Maj = G A B C D E F#), so you really understand it, and learn to recognise the sound of it - that way you'll be able to use it as a baseline to understand pretty much any scale, arpeggio, chord or mode you need to.

Edit: Once you get the major scale nailed, learn how the natural minor is related to it, then learn how the pentatonics are related to the major and minor scales.


^This is the best place IMO to start.

Quote by anderseb
Cough, Cough, Lydian, Mixolydian, Dorian.


Couldn't disagree with this more.

Quote by padfootpak
Good advice man. but are'nt there some scales that sound better on the electric rather than the acoustic and vice versa???


??? How?, a particular scale doesn't change because it is played on a different instrument. It is how you use the scale that determines how good (subjective) it sounds.
Last edited by Myshadow46_2 at Nov 25, 2009,
#15
Quote by padfootpak
Good advice man. but are'nt there some scales that sound better on the electric rather than the acoustic and vice versa???


That would be implying that some notes sound "better" on different instruments.

A note is a note, what matters is which ones you use how.
#16
Quote by padfootpak
Good advice man. but are'nt there some scales that sound better on the electric rather than the acoustic and vice versa???
Not really. Some scales are more commonly used in some genres of music than others, which means that they may be more commonly played on instruments that typically play those genres, but they still use the same notes. And the major scale is still the daddy of them all

Learning the major scale will help you understand all the other scales - and arpeggios, and chords.

If you want to start improvising straight away learn the minor pentatonic too - you only need 1st position to start with - then when you understand the major and minor scales, learn how the pentatonics are related to them