#1
Can someone give some exercises for memorizing arpeggios.
Quote by hendo123456789
invincibleneo - you are one of the only people in this thread that talk sense.
#2
just take a song you like, and break down the chords, i do it a lot and it's adds fun to the exercise
#4
Learn how to find intervals - then if you can spell the arpeggio you can play it
#6
5? I can think of about 20 without even trying.
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#7
The easiest way is to learn all of the intervals on the fretboard and learn the formulas of the arpeggios you want to play. It will take time, but if you do it this way you'll learn how to play any arpeggio all over the fretboard. If you decided to just learn patterns you'll have more limitations.
#8
Actually what I was talking about arpeggio shape. I have a chart with all the notes laid out. And its a little overwhelming to look at. I can't make much of it.

@jsepguitar: I agree with what you say but I also think that memorizing shapes will help me get started more like side wheels when learning bicycles. Over time the shapes will dissapear and regular application will fade out the arpeggios. Like when I'm trying to express emotion accurately i'll be forced to think outside the shapes. But the shapes will be a healthy crutches atleast right now.
Quote by hendo123456789
invincibleneo - you are one of the only people in this thread that talk sense.
#9
Quote by jsepguitar
The easiest way is to learn all of the intervals on the fretboard and learn the formulas of the arpeggios you want to play. It will take time, but if you do it this way you'll learn how to play any arpeggio all over the fretboard. If you decided to just learn patterns you'll have more limitations.



I dont see why you would not learn patterns. Just learn what notes are in each arpeggio, and where they are on the fretboard. Intervals are good to learn but I will never count intervals on a fretboard when I can just hit the note I need.
Quote by UtBDan
this man hits the nail on the head.
#11
Quote by ChrisN
5? I can think of about 20 without even trying.


Well, I meant 5 different positions of shapes. There are hundreds of chords, so there will be as many arpeggio shapes, but the same arpeggio usually has 5 positions that cover the entire neck, like scales. Off course, you can create some shapes that are in-between those positions, but it's easier to start with 5 of them.
#12
Quote by invincibleneo
Actually what I was talking about arpeggio shape. I have a chart with all the notes laid out. And its a little overwhelming to look at. I can't make much of it.

@jsepguitar: I agree with what you say but I also think that memorizing shapes will help me get started more like side wheels when learning bicycles. Over time the shapes will dissapear and regular application will fade out the arpeggios. Like when I'm trying to express emotion accurately i'll be forced to think outside the shapes. But the shapes will be a healthy crutches atleast right now.
Ok - if you want arpeggio shapes work em out for yourself slowly. Pick a root note, and stick your index finger on it on the E string. Then stay in that position and play the 3rd, 5th and 7th. Woohoo, you just played a 1 octave major arp Do it again and you've got a 2 octave arp. Then move your hand down so your pinky is on the root instead of your index finger and do the same from their. Then start over but on the A string instead of the E string - and you've got 4 Major arp shapes straight away. And more importantly, if you work them out like that for yourself you'll understand wheere they come from too.
#13
Quote by blueriver
I dont see why you would not learn patterns. Just learn what notes are in each arpeggio, and where they are on the fretboard. Intervals are good to learn but I will never count intervals on a fretboard when I can just hit the note I need.


Everyone has their own way of looking at things, so if patterns work for you then use them. The problem I see with patterns is that there are too many of them once you get further along in your guitar playing. Think of all the scale patterns all over the fretboard, all the possible chord voicings, all of the arpeggios in every position. That's a lot of patterns to learn. If you understand intervals it gets easier to remember things. If you take any chord and you understand intervals you can flatten or sharpen notes to create new chords. That seem more efficient than learning a bunch of chord shapes.

If you know the scale formula, you can play the scale anywhere on the fretboard if you understand intervals. If you know the arpeggio formula you can play the arpeggio anywhere on the fretboard.

Just to clarify, when I say learn the intervals I don't mean whole step, whole step, half step, etc. That is something you should learn, but what I'm talking about is seeing the tonic/root notes and undertanding the degree of every note that is in that position. So if you are playing at the 12th fret and in C major you know the roots are at the 15th fret of the A string and the 13th fret of the B string. If you know intervals you'll know that the note right next to the C on the low E string is the 5th, the note on the D string one fret down is a 3rd, etc. If you know all of the note names and intervals you'll always find the notes you need.

Also, all notes aren't created equal, so it helps to know which notes are the root, 3rd, 5th, 7th, etc. If you just learn patterns it's sometimes hard to differentiate the different notes right away.

Not saying my way is the best, just passing along what works for me.
#14
From the discussion I developed something. Tell me if it sounds okay.

What I'm gonna do is that I'll identify arpeggio notes in each scale pattern/shape, just like root notes in the scale. And then I can apply it everywhere?
For example I'll know exact places within the scale pattern where the arpeggios notes are. Not neccesarily in the 1-3-5-7 order.

Does that sound okay from long term POV?

Is there any problem w/ taking this approach in terms of getting too limited in the shape or something?

For the record, I'm just playing out interval and making some logical shapes out of playing 1-3-5-7. It seems okay but theres a long way to go. Until I can find a better method, I'll do this.
Quote by hendo123456789
invincibleneo - you are one of the only people in this thread that talk sense.
#15
I don't think anyone directly answered your question.... the way I memorize arpeggio's, so that I can use them whenever I would like and not clumsily, is I take any arpeggio, play it on a particular root, say the name of the arpeggio while i play it. and then repeat down and up the fret board in half steps, whole steps, minor 3rds, etc...

for example, if you're going to use an F minor arpeggio, say "F minor", play it, go down a half step, "E minor", down a half step, "Eb minor", repeat down AND up the fretboard.

this makes you pay attention to where the root is, and if you use this with as many arpeggios as you know, and can put it into a daily routine, it will do wonders. hope that helps.
#16
Is it a good idea to use chords as anchor points to memorize arpeggios?
Quote by hendo123456789
invincibleneo - you are one of the only people in this thread that talk sense.
#17
Quote by invincibleneo
Can someone give some exercises for memorizing arpeggios.


play & memorize these

http://www.discoverguitaronline.com/images/browse/arpeggios

Quote by invincibleneo
Is it a good idea to use chords as anchor points to memorize arpeggios?


Sure, why not? If it helps you, it's a good idea.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 3, 2009,
#18
Quote by invincibleneo
Is it a good idea to use chords as anchor points to memorize arpeggios?

Of course, after all that's all arpeggios really are.
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