#1
Hi, I'm 16

I know that as I get older, my voice deepens and it gets harder to hit those high notes.

My current comfortable range is low e (bottom string on guitar) to f above middle c. Is there any way to 'preserve' this sort of range?
Also, is it true that falsetto can go as well (can hit octave above the f over middle c)?


Thanks,
AJ
#3
Quote by vsdornelas
I know one way, but you won't like it. it's "castrato". look for it on wikipedia


1) failed attempt to be funny
2) too late for castrato anyway
3) singing lessons
#4
Quote by vsdornelas
I know one way, but you won't like it. it's "castrato". look for it on wikipedia


Jesus Christ, Wtf? Castration before puberty to retain vocal range? That is just sick.
And I have to agree with ComradSputnik, he probably reached puberty a while ago.
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Last edited by KrlzGmz at Nov 24, 2009,
#5
Welcome to puberty! I hate to say it, but this is only going to get worse. Things that you can do to keep your range... continue to use your voice. I know it kills our singer when we're off for too long and he doesn't sing. It's harder to hit the higher range.

One thing that we do to help out our singer, and believe me it's done with every band as the singers get older, is to tune our instruments down a half or whole step. A half a step down doesn't sound like much, but believe me it helps tremendously. You could take it one step further and could learn songs in a lower key. Say, you learn a song in D. Re-learn it in C. Transposing songs is a good skill for the musicians in your band to learn anyway.
#6
At 16, most people's voices are done getting lower, and start to get stronger and richer instead. If you keep vocalizing, your range will get higher, not lower.
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