#1
Can someone tell me about keys and how they work. I know some therory and my guitar teacher told me that its basically what chord you use the most. I would like someone to explain it better so I can solo eaiser. I play metal so it wont be played over big chords power chords and single notes mostly.
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#2
sigh...another pointless thread created by someone who is too lazy (or stupid?) to google it. there is probably hundreds of articles about this on UG alone.
#3
I clicked this thread from the main page hoping to learn something interesting off the cuff, instead I found out JayLacelle is a dick.
#4
I reckon the easiest way to understand keys is to understand the major scale. And how to harmonise it by stacking thirds. Then you will know what chords and what notes go with what key, which makes it much easier to work out what key a song is in.

Simplified version - A key of a song is basically the scale its based on. The melody uses notes from that scale, the chords use notes from that scale, and it resolves to the tonic of that scale - which means it wants to end on that note/chord. You normally keep coming back to the tonic chord of a key in a song, as its a comfortable place to land at the end of a section or phrase, so the most common chord can be a good place to start in finding the key, but it can be misleading.
#5
Quote by JayLacelle
sigh...another pointless thread created by someone who is too lazy (or stupid?) to google it. there is probably hundreds of articles about this on UG alone.


Well I don't understand them and thats why im asking.....
Gibson Thunderhorse
Jackson RR24M
B52 AT100
#6
"The key (or key signature) identifies the tonic note (doh, a deer a female deer....) and what sharps or flats will be used in that key. Each key has it's own specific sharps or flats (either or, not both!) In the key of C there are no sharps or flats and Doh is C, Re is D, Mi is E and so on.... In the Key of G, G is tonic and there is one sharp : F#, Thus Doh is G, Re A, Mi B, Fa C, So D,La E, Te F# Doh.G)
Though the name of the key identifies the tonic, it is not necessarily the first note of a piece of music.

As for what your guitar teacher said, its basically correct that it can be determined by the chords that are played.

So typically the tonic chord or note (most often played, or resolved to) typically indicates what "key" the song is in.

So if the song you want to solo in is in the key of C then you can solo, for example, using either C minor pentatonic scale or major depending on the song.

Guitar Keys are typically formed at Tone Tone Tone Semi Tone, Tone Tone Tone Semi Tone across the note spectrum....so...

For Key of A: A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G#, A (TTTS-TTTS)
For Key of B: B, C#, D#, E, F, G#, A#, B

So on and so on.

When you play notes and/or chords listed in these keys they should always sound good.

Hope this was helpful
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#7
Quote by King of King V
Well I don't understand them and thats why im asking.....


i know my first post was harsh, but this thread has been made hundreds of times.

this site has thousands of articles on this topic, so why didn't you try them first?
#8
Quote by Chirp08
I clicked this thread from the main page hoping to learn something interesting off the cuff, instead I found out JayLacelle is a dick.


...nice to meet you too?

please don't judge people so fast, reading 1 post and calling them a "dick" is a little rude.

i was upset at the TS because i had just finished explaining the topic to someone in a different thread and im tired of repeating myself. the search bar is a useful tool, so use it.