#1

Quoted from ZeGuitaist:
In fact, using the notes 1-3-5 from any Major scale from all around the fretboard, you could create 5 Major chords of the root note, using the 5 open shapes provided: in the image, the E shape is the first one, then the D shape if you go higher up the neck, then the C shape, followed by the A shape, and finally the G shape. If you go even further up, past the 12th fret, you will get the E shape again.

So, there are 5 possible Major chord positions for every root, and going up the fretboard they are in the following order: C shape, A shape, G shape, E shape, D shape, C shape again, and so on... This system of localizing the notes of the Major scale is therefore called the CAGED system, after the order of the Major open chord shapes.

Before you go to the next paragraph, try to memorize the pattern of chord shapes on your guitar's fretboard! Take your guitar, play a Major chord, and try to find all 5 possible shapes of the chord, using the diagram I provided above! Note that the "open G shape" and "open D shape" are very hard to play practically, but just try to find their location... When you can find these 5 locations easily, you can use them as orientation points for all the other notes!


My question is, if I were playing in the key of Amaj what chords would they be because I know I move all the root,regular & minor root notes up five frets but would the chords still be recognized as a Cmaj, Amaj, Gmaj, Emaj & Dmaj?
My Gear
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-Marshall MG10CD
-Line 6 Spider 3 15 Watt
-Jackson JS30RR
-Ibanez RG2EX1





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#2
No. You're falling into the area of key signatures and the circle of fifths. I also think you're misinterpreting the way the CAGED system works. The C major scale in the G position is not a "G maj" scale, it's always a C major scale, you're just playing it with your first finger on the fifth fret, and for reference sake the scale pattern or barre chord you play looks like an open G chord.

So to try to answer your question:
A major scale, C shape (pinky on the 12th fret A string): A major scale.
A major scale, D shape (first finger on the 7th fret D string): Still an A major scale.
A major scale, G shape (pinky on fifth fret low E string): Yep, an A major scale.

The diatonic chords in A major are: A major 7, B minor 7, C# minor 7, D major 7, E dominant 7, F# minor 7, and G# minor 7 b5. Even if that wasn't what you wanted, it's good to know the diatonic chord cycle.
#3
OHHHHHHHHH thank you so much that helped A LOT
My Gear
...................................................
-Marshall MG10CD
-Line 6 Spider 3 15 Watt
-Jackson JS30RR
-Ibanez RG2EX1





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