#1
My band is ready to record and since we're all on such a tight budget we've decided to attempt it ourselves. My main concern is recording drums since I only have 2 overheads mics, a SM57 on the snare and a 52A kick drum mic. I was wondering if anyone else has tried a similar approach and how it turned out for you. Any tips would also be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
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#2
Quote by TheRedScare
My band is ready to record and since we're all on such a tight budget we've decided to attempt it ourselves. My main concern is recording drums since I only have 2 overheads mics, a SM57 on the snare and a 52A kick drum mic. I was wondering if anyone else has tried a similar approach and how it turned out for you. Any tips would also be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

If you've only got four mics, that's definitely the way to do it. Not much to say there, really. All I can add is make sure the cables are all the same length - especially the overheads - or you could get some phase issues. Otherwise, just move stuff around until it works.

If I were setting up mics, all I would add is a couple more cheap mics to pick up reverb and room noise.
#3
^ yeah pretty much, I've recorded drums with anything from two to 12 mics, and your setup is pretty standard, especially if the drummer doesn't use his toms a lot.
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#4
Quote by jean_genie
All I can add is make sure the cables are all the same length - especially the overheads - or you could get some phase issues. Otherwise, just move stuff around until it works.

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that would not effect the phase

also

instead of doing overhead mics

try 2 room mics glyn johns method, or the johns glyn whatever it is google it it r00lz
#5
Quote by CatharsisStudio
that would not effect the phase

also

instead of doing overhead mics

try 2 room mics glyn johns method, or the johns glyn whatever it is google it it r00lz


the Glyn Johns method uses overheads...

It works ok for basic rock and jazz sounds, but it is pretty hard to set up properly unless you really know what you are doing.
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#6
someone showed me this little trick to getting a balanced sound with two overheads that ive used ever since. every time ive recorded drums (albeit, not that many times) ive used this with decent results.

the idea behind this is that your snare is the "center" of your kit. for most rock styles, this is usually true, the snare and kick are the most used drums. so start with having your drummer sit down at his kit the way he normally would play. then takes his sticks and stacks them end to end. one end of the "long stick" goes on the center of the snare head. now your overheads will go somewhere on that spherical surface you get when rotating the sticks around the center point that is the snare head. ive usually gone over each shoulder of the drummer and then off to the side a touch more. pan the mics to their respective sides and youve got a fairly balanced sound. obviously you have to make sure that the mics suit the layout of the kit, but ive found that a good way to start.
#7
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
the Glyn Johns method uses overheads...

It works ok for basic rock and jazz sounds, but it is pretty hard to set up properly unless you really know what you are doing.


True. Only good for solid drummers as well, if your drummer isn't very good with his timing and fills it makes the whole thing much more difficult to work with.