#1
not meaning yngwie or satch. Just a reg lead guitarist in a local band. THat makes covers and originals.
My newest cover Rivers Of Babylon sublime style.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=J_E7iWLxmiA


My gear:
taylor 310
Fender strat MiM
Cry Baby-GCB-95
Tone port ux2
tascam dp4
80s rock, classic rock, classic metal
#3
can u give examples of each. What scales are good to know? Im learning the the major scale now. I know major and minor pent.
My newest cover Rivers Of Babylon sublime style.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=J_E7iWLxmiA


My gear:
taylor 310
Fender strat MiM
Cry Baby-GCB-95
Tone port ux2
tascam dp4
80s rock, classic rock, classic metal
#5
Scales; learn your pentatonic and diatonic scales and you'll be good to go. Scales don't play as huge of a part in being a lead guitarist as you might think, though. It's not just about what notes you play, but how you play them. This is where dynamics come in, and what ultimately develops your unique playing style that will distinguish you from just being "another lead guitarist". The odd thing is, you'll never fully reach this point. Until the day you quit playing or die, your personal style will continue to develop and you'll continue to improve. What tenfold said are all just components of being a lead guitarist.
#6
Do all of the above, but most importantly

grow an exceptionally large ego.


someone once said that guitarists are egomaniacs, cause if they weren't, they would play the bass.
2008 Fender American Standard Stratocaster
Schecter C-1+
Squier '51 (blonde with black pickguard)
Fender Super Champ XD
#7
Scales, start with the major and all it's modes. Pentatonic as well. Depending on the bands you cover, you may want to learn harmonic minor and melodic minor as well.

Major and minor arpeggios in root and both inversions.

Good picking technique (I'd recommend directional picking (which usually starts a mob of alternate picking enthusiasts ))

Improvisation

Songwriting

Ear training

And a bit of theory never hurts
#8
whats the arpeggios part u mentioned? i know what it is say a g barre chord arpegiated is one note at a time from 6 to 1 string? explain plz. ty so mch
My newest cover Rivers Of Babylon sublime style.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=J_E7iWLxmiA


My gear:
taylor 310
Fender strat MiM
Cry Baby-GCB-95
Tone port ux2
tascam dp4
80s rock, classic rock, classic metal
#9
Here's an example. This is A minor, root position.

e|-----------------12-17-
B|--------------13-------
G|-----------14----------
D|--------14-------------
A|--12-15----------------
E|-----------------------


and back down (I don't want to write the whole thing, sorry )

This can be used for sweep picking, but more useful, particularly at beginning and intermediate stages, is to memorize all the shapes (6 in total, 3 major and 3 minor) and use them to quickly identify chord tones when improvising.
#10
Oh, sorry, I forgot to mention that the difference between this and what you mentioned (arpeggiating a chord) is that you aren't letting each note ring into the next note to create the sound of a chord.
#11
Learn to play the guitar, it's not really any more complicated than that.
Actually called Mark!

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#12
Seriously, if you are a covers band, just learn the solos involved to start with. Don't worry too much about the theory straight away. Work on getting the phrasing correct and timing correct (although I guess you could argue that timing is a big part of phrasing). By doing this you are learning to solo. Then if it interests you you can look at these solos you've learnt and start to apply your knowledge of theory to them. Work out what scales they are using, then you can use this to adapt the solos you've learnt by adding your own parts and changing bits.

If you do want to learn theory don't

Quote by chrisweyers
start with the major and all it's modes.


Start with just the major scale. It is the scale that most other scales are derive from so understanding it is important before moving on. By all means look at pentatonic major alongside the major scale and then look into natural minor and pentatonic minor.

For your general band, those are the only scales you'll need and as the pentatonics are just either the major or natural minor scale less two notes then the job isn't quite as daunting as it may seem.

When I say learn scales, I mean how they are constructed, how you derived chords from them and ultimately putting them into practice so you can hear how they sound. There are some links in my sig that might help, there is a lot of information there though so digest it in your own time. Don't rush yourself and, most of all, have fun; theory shouldn't be a chore.

However:

Quote by steven seagull
Learn to play the guitar, it's not really any more complicated than that.


pretty much sums it up!!
Last edited by Myshadow46_2 at Nov 25, 2009,
#13
Quote by silly6-string
THat makes covers and originals.

Just want to point out this part of his original post. I missed it the first time I read it, too
#14
Quote by Myshadow46_2
Seriously, if you are a covers band, just learn the solos involved to start with. Don't worry too much about the theory straight away. Work on getting the phrasing correct and timing correct (although I guess you could argue that timing is a big part of phrasing). By doing this you are learning to solo. Then if it interests you you can look at these solos you've learnt and start to apply your knowledge of theory to them. Work out what scales they are using, then you can use this to adapt the solos you've learnt by adding your own parts and changing bits.

If you do want to learn theory don't



Start with just the major scale. It is the scale that most other scales are derive from so understanding it is important before moving on. By all means look at pentatonic major alongside the major scale and then look into natural minor and pentatonic minor.

For your general band, those are the only scales you'll need and as the pentatonics are just either the major or natural minor scale less two notes then the job isn't quite as daunting as it may seem.

When I say learn scales, I mean how they are constructed, how you derived chords from them and ultimately putting them into practice so you can hear how they sound. There are some links in my sig that might help, there is a lot of information there though so digest it in your own time. Don't rush yourself and, most of all, have fun; theory shouldn't be a chore.

However:


pretty much sums it up!!
+1

Theory can help a lot writing your own songs, especially if you need to communicate your ideas to different muscians (eg other band members). But don't think you can't write without it - it just makes life easier, as you better understand what you're doing.
#15
Quote by steven seagull
Learn to play the guitar, it's not really any more complicated than that.


+1

To be a good lead guitarist, you HAVE to know the LOGIC behind your instrument, you must know your chords, and when you know your chords logically, you'll know your scales to go over them...there is a great deal of theory involved, but it's not "nukelar" science. Without it, you can play, yes, but it's better to know what you play.

So start with simple rhythm, chord logic, CAGED system, and stuff will slowly unwind.
I am Žile, I'm from Serbia, and I like guitars... and beans of course...never underestimate well cooked beans!

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