#1
I was fiddling around with chords and made this progression:

Em7-Am7-D7-Gmaj7-Em7-Am7-D7-C13-Em7-Am7-D7-Gmaj7-C7-F#m7b5-B7-B7sus4-B7

I'm not going to write out a tab since the people who are able to answer this will know how it sounds anyway.

Now I was wondering, is this like some standard progression in jazz? Because it seems very familiar to me...
#2
looking at it quickly without an instrument I'd say it sounds familiar because you are using ii-V-I as the ending of a couple phrases (for one of which you seem to comp IV) Also, you're going down in 5ths, which is a common thing to do.

Oh and the ii-V-I is probably the most commonly used progression in jazz, not sure if you already knew that but just to be safe
#3
It's just a little progression in the key of G, with a lot of dominant chords some of which are secondary dominants.
When analyzing harmony in jazz, I suggest looking at the chords separate relationship with each other. Many jazz melodies are harmonized simply by stringing together a series of dominant cadences.
Quote by thsrayas
Why did women get multiple orgasms instead of men? I want a river of semen flowing out of my room to mark my territory.

You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
#5
That B7 at the end of the progression leading to the Em7 is a secondary dominant. It's a dominant chord 'borrowed' from the following chords key, making for a smoother more consonant cadence.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secondary_dominant
Quote by thsrayas
Why did women get multiple orgasms instead of men? I want a river of semen flowing out of my room to mark my territory.

You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
#7
i - v - iv - v - i - v - iv - v - bVI7
I'm not sure how to explain that Bb13, but the rest is just pretty straightforward.
Quote by thsrayas
Why did women get multiple orgasms instead of men? I want a river of semen flowing out of my room to mark my territory.

You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
Last edited by 7even at Nov 26, 2009,