#1
1) i wrote a bunch of pop rock song (music and lyrics) and i cant just decide in which key to sing them

an example cause my english sux!

A sweet ballad with a basic chord progression G - Bm - Em - C. I can sing it very nice with so much passion, i can hit all the notes BUT lets say if i take it down a half or a whole step (on F# or F) i can sing it much more comfortable but you know .. there\s something missing .. you dont get the same feeling/energy/passion .. What do u do in a situation like this?

i ve read somewhere .. its not good to push ur self singin too high .. and i feel thats right cause theres no way to sing live 4 songs like this in a row, it feels impossible and maybe i will damage my vocal chords.

i dont even know whats the type of my voice, tenor or baritone... my voice sounds like Rivers Cuomo from Weezer and i can sing all of their songs without sweat .. i feel i can go a little bit higher but i think thats my type of voice ..

can u tell me whats his type of voice pls??

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CEw6AE6phuc


2) on this basic chord progression G - Bm - Em - C ( thats the overused formula I - III - VI - IV )

if i remember correctly ionian G major scale is like this G, Am, Bm, C, D, Em, F#

by accident i was playing G - Bm - Em - Cm on guitar (barre chords) .. and it sounds brilliant ... but its suppose to be C not Cm .. whats that thing?? is that wrong? is there maybe any part in music theory which says about that thing .. ? it sounds good to my ears .. try it on acoustic guitar finger picking .. it sounds really nice to me ..

thanks and sorry for the stupid amateur questions ...
#2
Quote by goldfinger69



2) on this basic chord progression G - Bm - Em - C ( thats the overused formula I - III - VI - IV )

if i remember correctly ionian G major scale is like this G, Am, Bm, C, D, Em, F#

by accident i was playing G - Bm - Em - Cm on guitar (barre chords) .. and it sounds brilliant ... but its suppose to be C not Cm .. whats that thing?? is that wrong? is there maybe any part in music theory which says about that thing .. ? it sounds good to my ears .. try it on acoustic guitar finger picking .. it sounds really nice to me ..

thanks and sorry for the stupid amateur questions ...



just cause its not part of a scale or anything doesnt mean it cant sound good. 'music theory' are more guidelines then rules
#3
Quote by goldfinger69

2) on this basic chord progression G - Bm - Em - C ( thats the overused formula I - III - VI - IV )

if i remember correctly ionian G major scale is like this G, Am, Bm, C, D, Em, F#

by accident i was playing G - Bm - Em - Cm on guitar (barre chords) .. and it sounds brilliant ... but its suppose to be C not Cm .. whats that thing?? is that wrong? is there maybe any part in music theory which says about that thing .. ? it sounds good to my ears .. try it on acoustic guitar finger picking .. it sounds really nice to me ..


There is really no wrong playing if it sounds good it's good. About the theory part, if I remember correctly, is that you took the Cm chord from the parallel minor (so G minor in this case) in your progression. Sorry if I made this confusing for you.
Skip the username, call me Billy
#4
Quote by goldfinger69
2) on this basic chord progression G - Bm - Em - C ( thats the overused formula I - III - VI - IV )

if i remember correctly ionian G major scale is like this G, Am, Bm, C, D, Em, F#

by accident i was playing G - Bm - Em - Cm on guitar (barre chords) .. and it sounds brilliant ... but its suppose to be C not Cm .. whats that thing?? is that wrong? is there maybe any part in music theory which says about that thing .. ? it sounds good to my ears .. try it on acoustic guitar finger picking .. it sounds really nice to me ..

thanks and sorry for the stupid amateur questions ...


I guess that would just be borrowing from the parallel minor. I just tried it and G Bm Em C seems to fit more nicely than Cm, but with the Cm it adds a sad kind of air to it, which is cool too.

when it comes to stuff like that, even if you don't know enough theory to explain it, you should ultimately go with what fits better with what you're trying to do. Also with stuff like that, there's normally some kind of theory that will explain it, or at least loosely explain it, it's just likely that you haven't heard of it yet.


like with the borrowing from parallel keys: basically a parallel key would be a key that shares the same tonic, but has different intervals. kinda like how a relative key contains the same notes, but a different tonic.

example:

G minor is the parallel minor of G major

G major is the relative major of E minor
#5
Music theory is explanations of sounds. It should help you analyze the sounds you hear, but never dictate what you play.
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#6
Quote by goldfinger69
1) i can hit all the notes BUT lets say if i take it down a half or a whole step (on F# or F) i can sing it much more comfortable but you know .. there\s something missing ..
I see two possibilities:

The higher key you sing in (within certain reasonable limits), the brighter it sounds. About two centuries ago, orchestra's were challenging each other by playing higher than the next one just because of that reason.

What you did was the opposite. You took it down a notch. So it's natural that you feel that the new version is less bright. But someone who's never heard the first version, will probably not have that feeling.

The other thing I can think of is that you made a mistake in your transposition (even though from the little you wrote you seem to know what you're doing). Better double-check.

By the way, your English is better than most native-english-speakers on this site. Just put your I's in upper case and you'll be fine. ;-)
#7
A minor chord iv is a commonly borrowed from the parrlel minor in major keys. Chord bvi is also commonly used.
#8
Quote by goldfinger69
you dont get the same feeling/energy/passion .. What do u do in a situation like this?

Remember that it's all in your head. You're meant to pick the key which is easiest to sing, not the key that sounds best. Since the advent of equal temperament, all keys sound a like.

Quote by goldfinger69
can u tell me whats his type of voice pls??
Sounds like a low-ish tenor.

Quote by goldfinger69
by accident i was playing G - Bm - Em - Cm on guitar (barre chords) .. and it sounds brilliant ... but its suppose to be C not Cm .. whats that thing?? is that wrong? is there maybe any part in music theory which says about that thing .. ? it sounds good to my ears .. try it on acoustic guitar finger picking .. it sounds really nice to me ..

thanks and sorry for the stupid amateur questions ...
Believe it or not, it actually doesn't matter what chords you use or how much you stray from a key, as long as you do it right. In music, there are things that work and things that don't. Lucky for you, you stumbled across something that works.

What you have there is called a borrowed chord, which still functions as a iv chord and still provides some resolution. If you want more resolution, I highly suggest you use D7 though. For the very last line of your verse, I suggest you use a perfect authentic cadence (D7-Gmaj).

The beautiful thing about tonal music is that we're free to stray away from completely diatonic music. As long as we still establish a tonal centre somehow (by using the perfect authentic cadence), it doesn't really matter.

Hope I helped
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Last edited by demonofthenight at Nov 27, 2009,
#9
just wow .... thank you everyone especially to demonofthenight for the useful in-depth-information
#10
Quote by griffRG7321
A minor chord iv is a commonly borrowed from the parrlel minor in major keys. Chord bvi is also commonly used.


Typically its ♭VI, not ♭vi.

♭VII is also a really common chord in major keys, borrowed from the parallel minor.
#11
Quote by isaac_bandits
Typically its ♭VI, not ♭vi.

♭VII is also a really common chord in major keys, borrowed from the parallel minor.


oops typo