#1
ok, so a friend of mine has been taking singing lessons, but lately she's been having problems with her voice. she describes it as "not rough" but at the same time "not clear" and that it sometimes hurts after singing, if a bit tense. she says its hard to describe, but is there anything she can do to keep her voice in good form? i've suggested just giving it a rest, but i doubt that's very practical given the communicative nature of the voice.
Quote by Heilz
When backstage and talkin to the ladies i always go with the ¨Mines is bigger than theirs¨ argument as me bro holds hes guitar and i take out my bass... It works wonders @,@


Gear list:
Squire Affinity P-Bass
Ashdown Mag300 Evo II
Boss ODB-3
#2
Quote by Raizer Sabre
i've suggested just giving it a rest, but i doubt that's very practical given the communicative nature of the voice.
What? You mean since she's a girl she has trouble shutting up? Sorry, just kidding...

This actually worries me a bit. What does her teacher say? Is he/she a professional or just someone who tries to make an extra buck?

I dug up an article for you about a renowned Canadian ENT doctor who treats a lot of singers. I don't take much stock in his spiritual side of healing (as a matter of fact, where I come from, you'd be hard-pressed getting a job in a hospital if you admitted to believe in that stuff), but a few points seem interesting nonetheless:

interviewer: What are the most common vocal disorders?
doc: Muscular tension dysphonia or supraglottic hyperfunction - excessive muscle tension in muscles above the larynx. Common symptoms are pain after singing, inability to hit high notes, difficulty in passaggio (transitioning between the different registers of the voice), constant clearing of the throat, pain in neck and head and tightness in the jaw.

Are these symptoms your friend has?

interviewer: What are the three most important things a singer can do to prevent vocal disorders?
doc: 1. Breathe correctly 2. Drink lots of water 3. Warm up every day

I was told that a good and easy warm-up technique is to hum.
#3
i don't actually know what her teacher says because since he tried coming on to her, she's lost whatever respect she had for him. nonetheless there are some interesting points since she's worried she's ruined her voice. she's not a professional, she just likes singing. but thanks for that, there are a few interesting points in there i will be sure to pass on
Quote by Heilz
When backstage and talkin to the ladies i always go with the ¨Mines is bigger than theirs¨ argument as me bro holds hes guitar and i take out my bass... It works wonders @,@


Gear list:
Squire Affinity P-Bass
Ashdown Mag300 Evo II
Boss ODB-3
#4
i've spoken to my friend and she says that a friend of hers (who is doing something to do with dentistry or something and has had to study the throat) recommends avoiding icy and fried foods and was wondering two things. 1: does it even help and 2: should she make it a permanent change?
Quote by Heilz
When backstage and talkin to the ladies i always go with the ¨Mines is bigger than theirs¨ argument as me bro holds hes guitar and i take out my bass... It works wonders @,@


Gear list:
Squire Affinity P-Bass
Ashdown Mag300 Evo II
Boss ODB-3
#5
Quote by Raizer Sabre
a friend of hers (...) recommends avoiding icy and fried foods (...) does it even help
The internet is littered with lists of tips from self-acclaimed experts. It's nearly impossible to find out if these are valid. And let me be clear, I'm not an expert either.

should she make it a permanent change?
Most parts of our body heal naturally, so unless the damage is really severe I doubt the pain will remain. But if her voice hurts almost every time she has a singing practice, there is something going on that most likely won't be remedied with simple dietary changes.

If the pain appeared after her first few sessions, then it is possible that her vocal chords need to adjust; grow some strength if you will. (Again, caution, I am not a doctor). In that case some rest (as you suggested in your first post) is probably the best. But otherwise I'd strongly advise to consult a medical doctor.

The thing I hear over and over is bad breathing techniques. They seem to cause all sorts of problems. Apparently one is supposed to breath with one's lower belly muscles and less with the chest muscles. Here's what I don't understand: why does it matter how your lungs are compressed if the air is blown through the same windpipe (trachea) anyway?
#6
Quote by Raizer Sabre
... a friend of mine has been taking singing lessons...it sometimes hurts after singing, if a bit tense...


is there anything she can do to keep her voice in good form?


Given what you've said here.... I would say find another teacher. Even if he wasn't coming on to her, if she is experiencing pain while she sings, she is NOT NOT NOT learning correctly.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.