#1
We're kinda desperate for a bassist, so this guitar player might play for us if we come up with bass gear.

Im wondering if we can just plug a bass into a guitar amp.

Would that damage the amp in any way ?
#4
Bad idea. It's generally fine for low level playing but to turn it up loud enough to jam- no...A bass amp would be ideal but a keyboard amp would also work.
#5
Not a good idea, especially with low-watt amps. A bass could blow out the amp.
#6
It won't hurt the amp at all. It will damage the speaker. So grab a cheap bass cab off of craigslist and plug the guitar amp into that cab. Problem solved.

Or grab a cheapo bass amp or keyboard amp.
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#7
It depends on the guitar amp. I currently play through my guitarist's old Marshall MG half stack for band practice and while it doesn't have enough lows to be acceptable for anything but practice, the amp does hold up and I do cut through the mix against a B52 half stack and a particularly loud drummer. Give it a shot, just be careful
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#8
Quote by gregs1020
It won't hurt the amp at all. It will damage the speaker. So grab a cheap bass cab off of craigslist and plug the guitar amp into that cab. Problem solved.

Or grab a cheapo bass amp or keyboard amp.


This. The head/amp will be fine, but it screws the speaker cone if you play bass frequencies through a guitar cab/combo.
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#9
Quote by pigeonmafia
This. The head/amp will be fine, but it screws the speaker cone if you play bass frequencies through a guitar cab/combo.


This is spot on. For the same output high frequencies make the speaker cone move quickly over a short distance and low frequencies of the same energy move slowly over a greater distance. Speakers not designed for this will fail after a relatively short time.

This is compounded by the lack of sensitivity of our ears to low frequencies which means a lot more power is needed for bass.

Amps will provide their power without excursion problems and though the tone controls won't be optimised for bass the amp will work ok. Youre going to need at least 100W though.
#10
Quote by gregs1020
It won't hurt the amp at all. It will damage the speaker. So grab a cheap bass cab off of craigslist and plug the guitar amp into that cab. Problem solved.

Or grab a cheapo bass amp or keyboard amp.


I always thought the same thing, Greg, but I remember reading somewhere that the frequencies a bass produces would actually damage the preamp section of a guitar amp - dunno how true that is though?
#11
Quote by i_am_metalhead
I always thought the same thing, Greg, but I remember reading somewhere that the frequencies a bass produces would actually damage the preamp section of a guitar amp - dunno how true that is though?


A guitar can achieve bass frequencies, the difference is the timbre and output. The guitar can also match the output as well, so really it's only the speaker that has a problem.
#12
Quote by Plexi81
A guitar can achieve bass frequencies, the difference is the timbre and output. The guitar can also match the output as well, so really it's only the speaker that has a problem.


I'm no physicist or anything but I believe that even though the pitch would be the same, the wave lengths/shapes would be different between a guitar and a bass.
#13
Quote by i_am_metalhead
the wave lengths/shapes would be different between a guitar and a bass.

They are, but it shouldn't affect the electronics.
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