#1
What operating system do you use to record? I have Windows 7 x64 but am curious about other people's opinions on operating systems. I am considering buying another hard drive specifically for recording and do not know which OS I should use. Ubuntu studio looks interesting, any comments about that? Is Windows 7 effective or should I stick with XP pro or Vista?
#2
I caught a demonstration last year of a guy using UbuntuStudio to set up a quick little demo song. He took it all the way from OS installation to a handful of basic tracks in a little over an hour. Granted, the song wasn't all that inspiring or anything and he'd definitely gone through the steps a few times before, but it looked pretty straightforward. I haven't tried it out myself, so I can't speak personally on it, but it seemed solid enough.

I'd also check out these articles, if you're thinking of the Linux route:
http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/7457
http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/7205
#3
I installed Windows 7 Ultimate 64 - Sonar 8 Producer 64-bit and then discovered my interface doesn't have 64-bit drivers So I repartitoned reinstalled all the 64-bit stuff - then on another 60-gig partition installed Windows 7 32-bit with Sonar 32-bit and now i record all my guitar stuff in 32-bit then I can do midi, etc on the 64-bit side & drag my guitar tracks over to tweak, etc. ALTHOUGH I don't really notice a BIG difference - Windows 7 runs fast and sweet and recording in it is a dream come true. I had Ubuntu installed a few months ago and was experimenting with ARDOUR as a DAW - seemed nice. Might Install it again too - actually have a 3-boot system... I'm a Mac guy normally - always recorded on my G5 system but Windows 7 is great on my laptop and I'm using it more and more lately. It came with VISTA - it sucked for recording - but 7 RULZ.
Now running an Eleven Rack with Pro Tools 10.3.3 - it's amazing and I'm having ball with it - worth every penny. PT 10 is tops IMO and the Eleven Rack is a work of art!
#4
I am using Vista 32-bit on my Laptop, however in the studio here at school, we are using quad core mac pros with a DIGI 003 in Studio B and a 96I/O and Presonus Digimax D8's in Studio A
I've bought, sold, and traded more gear than I care to admit.
#5
I use Mac OS X Snow Leopard. The system is so smooth and you don't have to worry about all that Windows crap like viruses and spy ware. Plus, it comes installed with Garage band.
#6
Quote by parhak
What operating system do you use to record? I have Windows 7 x64 but am curious about other people's opinions on operating systems. I am considering buying another hard drive specifically for recording and do not know which OS I should use. Ubuntu studio looks interesting, any comments about that? Is Windows 7 effective or should I stick with XP pro or Vista?


Currently I'm running 32 bit Vista Business but plan on going to 64 bit Windows 7 Home Pre. at the beginning of the year. Vista is working for me but it's been about a year since ive reformatted so I'm slowing down. Being able to run more than 4 GB memory with After Effects and my other software will be very nice too.

The choice is yours...either go with XP or go with W7. Vista is a little iffy still especially with Adobe Audition so I would go with XP if you are running that software.
#7
Windows XP.
I would suggest avoiding Linux if you are serious about audio work, while Linux is great for many things, audio recording/production is certainly not one of them.
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#8
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
Windows XP.
I would suggest avoiding Linux if you are serious about audio work, while Linux is great for many things, audio recording/production is certainly not one of them.


In case you didn't notice , a lot of recording studios use Mac's and their OS. This is because of the ease of use for their OS, and doesn't require all this extra expensive crap like Windows.
#9
Quote by iluvESP
In case you didn't notice , a lot of recording studios use Mac's and their OS. This is because of the ease of use for their OS, and doesn't require all this extra expensive crap like Windows.


Nah, but in case you didn't notice, it does require a PC that costs three times as much for the same thing....
#10
Quote by iluvESP
In case you didn't notice , a lot of recording studios use Mac's and their OS. This is because of the ease of use for their OS, and doesn't require all this extra expensive crap like Windows.


Such as?

You can get the exact same results you can with a Mac on Windows for much much less. So you have to google Audacity or Reaper and learn how to use it, but after that you're pretty much sorted for the other DAWs.
#11
Stick with Vista or lower for now. Its nothing dangerous but i keep finding opening plugins and audio programs causes program crashes in my install of 7. Might just be me, but i'd hang back for a couple of service packs until you know what you want to run is running flawless.
#12
Quote by maggot9779

You can get the exact same results you can with a Mac on Windows for much much less. So you have to google Audacity or Reaper and learn how to use it, but after that you're pretty much sorted for the other DAWs.

The keyword here is results. It's the process leading up to the results and the time-saving workflow management where the Mac excels. I've never loaded a single driver for any of my ~10 midi controllers, and my programs don't crash unless I overload the CPU (which I do all the time, because I love having 15 layers of affected midi tracks running at once).

Yeah, the PC is cheaper but you need to fight with it a bit and generally work harder and install more drivers to get the same results. Sure, it costs a little bit more, but in the long run it's totally worth it. I can also download all kinds of plugins/vst/ableton instruments without fear of getting a virus.

And seriously, who runs a DAW in linux? Really? I just don't understand why that would be a good idea whatsoever. I had ubuntu for a few months and it drove me crazy so I ditched it. Oh well.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
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P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#13
I think thread is about to, if not already done, derail into Mac OS vs Windows. The only way to maintain the debate is to accept that both have their plus points and their negatives. I can work with and like both, but pitting them against each at this point in time is futile , as in reality they both will do the same job just as well.
#14
I use Windows 7 x64, but I was using Vista x64, which took up do much memory it was just plain dumb. I would imagian that XP would be the best OP to use, since its prolly the most succesful OP Windows has ever produced. Its fast enough and accepts any programs.

But getting a second hard drive for recording and putting a seperate op on it seems like a good idea, I might just do that, I have a spare slot in my Asus for a terabit hard drive, might just dedicate it to recording.
#15
I was talking to the admin of the PreSonus forum last night about W7 drivers for my FP10 and he said that W7 was built with a lot of structure from Windows XP which made sense. I guess they are back to XP however still want to shine it up with all the graphics.

I personally think W7 is still better than XP at this point. Security is much better on this new OS as we have learned from the past.
#16
I use Mac OS X Snow Leopard.

I go to a music college, so all I see are Macs. For the Songwriter/Producer module of my BA, the college has setup a room in Colston Hall with 10 or 12 iMacs with Leopard. Most people here use Logic or Pro Tools. Several people have told me that Macs are basically the standard of the industry, and if you turn up with a Windows machine, people get a bit unsure of it.
#17
Quote by blue_strat
Several people have told me that Macs are basically the standard of the industry, and if you turn up with a Windows machine, people get a bit unsure of it.


Anyone who cares about this sort of trivial crap is usually some glorified audio elitist who will be the first to tell people about his $30000 pre's and vintage analogue gear. I also go to a music college and the lecturers are always getting boners for Mac Pros and reel to reel tape shit. Windows and Macs are both good for audio.

A lot of labels will want protools sessions, but thats windows too, so its not something to worry about. People should turn up with what they like, just as long as they know how to make it work.
#18
Quote by Beefmo
Anyone who cares about this sort of trivial crap is usually some glorified audio elitist who will be the first to tell people about his $30000 pre's and vintage analogue gear. I also go to a music college and the lecturers are always getting boners for Mac Pros and reel to reel tape shit. Windows and Macs are both good for audio.

They aren't elitist people, it's just the accepted main format. I've done plenty of audio work on Windows machines in the past, but I prefer the Mac.

Regarding the price, remember that these are computers that they make their livelihood off. These are the people who write and record for music magazines etc. I'd say it's worth stumping up 10-15% of your salary for a solid machine with good aftersale support. Sure, for a student or hobbyist it can make more sense to get a PC, but for professional audio and video Mac's are just preferred. Watch the Trent Reznor interview on Digg Dialoggs; he makes the point that since they work so much with video, they need Macs.

These people do have the money to spend, just as they have money to spend on the guitars and amps that earn them their living.
Last edited by blue_strat at Dec 15, 2009,
#19
Theres a difference between preference and "if you turn up with a Windows machine, people get a bit unsure of it.", that does cross the line from personal choices to just downright being sniffy, I mean I've had lecturers tell me macs are a million times better, but all I see is just a different OS for doing the same thing. Same inherent functionality.
#20
From what I've "read" in magazines windows 7 is completely unstable for most recording programs because they haven't issued compatibility updates for X64 which will render a lot of applications unusable, its not just your operating system though, you will need too look at your processor and RAM

I use Leopard 10.5.8 because its 100% stable, haven't used snow leopard but I've "heard" its just as unstable as windows 7
#21
I have worked in IT for the past 20 odd years and have been playing/recording since the late eighties, when it comes to audio and OS' - here are my twopennys:

1) Linux distro's (such as Ubuntu etc) - watch this space - only for the techies at the moment and not much worth mentioning in development at present. Worth a look

2) Mac's - nice and easy out of the box, my macbook pro runs my saffire pro 40 with lower latency than my XP 32bit PC does but it's expensive and there is less available in terms of apps/software and hardware. However, probably your best bet if you intend to record and surf on the same machine. The creatives choice.

3) XP - if you are on XP, dont bother upgrading to vista - unless you want decreased performance that is. You need to do a bit of Audio tuning to get the best out of it, switch off any services you dont need and make it a standalone system (no browsing!) with no AV. There is a lot more you can do though....google it or pay someone to do it for you

4) Vista - if you are running vista, you will get better performance by moving to either XP or windows 7

What do i run?? Currently (as well as my Macbook) I have xp 32 bit with 4gb of ram, a UAD card which all runs fine as long you are happy to adjust for record latency on larger projects.

I'm in the process of dropping £1600 on a new desktop system, which will be XP 64 bit with an option to upgrade to 7 once I'm happy to do so and shedloads of ram.....

This all assumes you want to go the engineer route as there are far more suitable options if you just want to be a musician who records/composes such as studio-in-a-box systems and that XT software which runs off a USB stick so is highly portable, or indeed a clunky old four-track!
EPILPSTDYamahaRBX100BassTanglewoodTW28/STRFenderchamp600CubaseStudio5Saffirepro40AlesisM1ActiveMKIIMAudioKeystation88RodeNT1AShureSM57KeeleyModTS9MackieMCUwww.myspace.com/cuthbertgriswald
#22
Quote by iluvESP
In case you didn't notice , a lot of recording studios use Mac's and their OS. This is because of the ease of use for their OS, and doesn't require all this extra expensive crap like Windows.


I also like a computer to work, and to actually be compatible with things.

Macs, unfortunatly, are not this. IMO, they are fully functional with Windows run on it.
Dont get me wrong, OS X is a nice operating system, and the machines look good. But for the price premium you pay, you're not really getting the software, or any guarantee on compatability. Most programs are not written for Mac.

Anyway, back on Topic.
In the past, I have used OSX, Windows XP x86/x64, Vista x86/x64 and Windows 7 x86/x64 for my recording rig.
I'm sticking to Windows 7 Ultimate x64 from now on. Its not too resource heavy, is perfectly compatible with all my devices, and runs smooth on my version of Cubase 5 and ProTools. I have a 4.2GHz CPU, 8gb of DDR2, and a GTX 285 GPU - and Windows 7 x64 is the only OS I have used so far which had no bottlenecks on this system.

A close second would be Windows Vista x64. People always say Vista was terrible, but its x64 support was great, especially for soundcards.

Just please, for the love of god dont choose XP x64 - its 64-bit driver support is very limited, and most drivers written were not optimized, resulting in PCI buffer and memory reference errors - not something you would like to deal with when working on a particularly large mix.

Can I just ask OP, whats your system specifications?
DARK_MATTER, Instrumental Post-Metal from Ireland


Bass:
Ibanez BTB 405QM
Ashdown PM600 - Peavey TVX 4x10
Russian Big Muff

Guitar:
Fender Jim Root sig
'99 Stagemaster 7-string
Yamaha F310
Hughes & Kettner Warp 7 w/4x12
#23
Quote by drawnacrol
From what I've "read" in magazines windows 7 is completely unstable for most recording programs because they haven't issued compatibility updates for X64 which will render a lot of applications unusable, its not just your operating system though, you will need too look at your processor and RAM

I use Leopard 10.5.8 because its 100% stable, haven't used snow leopard but I've "heard" its just as unstable as windows 7



Well, I got a experimental copy of Windows 7 home pro and I havent had any problems whatsoever with the system or recording. But I use Reaper, so idk.
#24
Quote by drawnacrol
From what I've "read" in magazines windows 7 is completely unstable for most recording programs because they haven't issued compatibility updates for X64 which will render a lot of applications unusable, its not just your operating system though, you will need too look at your processor and RAM

I use Leopard 10.5.8 because its 100% stable, haven't used snow leopard but I've "heard" its just as unstable as windows 7



Right now I'm using Snow Leopard and it runs GREAT. I mean i have never seen it crash even with 10 layer tracks...
#25
I haven't had any problems with Vista since I first started recording (which, coincidentally was right after Vista came out so the problems were expected).

Honestly, arguing over what OS we use is like arguing over what guitar is better. Sure, each has their pros and cons but at the end of the day, were still recording music.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#26
Quote by iluvESP
Right now I'm using Snow Leopard and it runs GREAT. I mean i have never seen it crash even with 10 layer tracks...


Really, Biggest problem I find with trying to decide on gear and software is when I read reviews in magazine or on forums, they say things don't work or are unstable, think I'll stop reading bad reviews, Ilife 10 should be out soon actually
#27
Quote by lockwolf
I haven't had any problems with Vista since I first started recording (which, coincidentally was right after Vista came out so the problems were expected).

Honestly, arguing over what OS we use is like arguing over what guitar is better. Sure, each has their pros and cons but at the end of the day, were still recording music.


That doesnt make sense.
Thats just like saying recording music on Windows 98 is the same as recording on Windows 7...

To be honest, theres lots of different recording platforms, and each person prefers different OS's, but in fairness, you do have to agree that running Windows 7 x64 is a whole lot better than running XP x64 - just an example.

I dont know what Audio programs your running, but I know for a fact that my Cubase 5 rig with several inputs and several VSTi's running at full load, would not perform very well on Vista x86. It runs acceptably on x64 Vista, but still has very buggy audio platforms.
DARK_MATTER, Instrumental Post-Metal from Ireland


Bass:
Ibanez BTB 405QM
Ashdown PM600 - Peavey TVX 4x10
Russian Big Muff

Guitar:
Fender Jim Root sig
'99 Stagemaster 7-string
Yamaha F310
Hughes & Kettner Warp 7 w/4x12
#28
As far as I'm aware Protools still doesnt run on Snow Leopard, so it isn't like compatibility issues aren't cross platform.
#29
Quote by roast
That doesnt make sense.
Thats just like saying recording music on Windows 98 is the same as recording on Windows 7...


Of the modern systems. Do you honestly think you'll be able to record as good in 95 as you can on a modern system?

Also, recording better on Win 7 Vs. XP is also subjective. People will argue that you need a higher end system to run Win 7 (which is true) though Win 7 is going to be more stable than XP.

I run Pro Tools and I've had it loaded a ton before. I've had about 12 tracks each loaded with all sorts of different synths, drum machines, effects, processors, ect. (prob close to 30 at the same time) and nothing wrong. Either I'm lucky or I'm doing something wrong to not get it to crash.

Quote by Beefmo
As far as I'm aware Protools still doesnt run on Snow Leopard, so it isn't like compatibility issues aren't cross platform.


They released a new build that works on Snow Leopard & Win 7 (though the 7 builds are a beta)
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#30
I use Xp I've used macs I personally hate apple and thats as far as i'll take my comments about macs to avoid a flame war
I've never had any problems with XP as far as recording
I download vst's all the time and have never had a virus
all in all it comes down to preference
#31
I've used Ubuntu, and unfortunately support for various external devices is still limited. I've used Sonar under WinXP64, and had a devil of a time getting my Motu interface working. It worked OK, but my experience with Windows was that the machine should be dedicated to your recording and optimized for it (shutting down unnecessary services, etc). If you do this, you can have a reliable and relatively low cost setup. Windows 7 may be just the thing to take advantage of higher end gear.

I'm now running a new Mac mini with Snow Leopard. The occasional problems with my Motu card are still there, but it is more usable on this system. I came to the realization that I would rather have simplicity for most of my work, so I bought an Apogee Duet interface and am using Logic Express. My work flows much better and the hardware is superb imho. Reason installed nicely too and integrates with Logic.

The best advice I have for someone starting out and who is unsure of what system to get is this; Determine your immediate needs. The learning curve on complex software is steep and the price of entry can be high. Get the best interface you can afford that satisfies your needs, then see how much $ you have left for a computer system and software. If you have lots of $, by all means try a Mac if you want (assuming compatibility with your chosen software and interface). If you have little left, you would get better bang for your buck from a Windows system. Don't forget to budget for some serious additional storage as well. Lots of 24x96 recording will use it up fast.

Your final product is going to be influenced far more by your interface than by the rest of your system, so don't skimp on that part of your setup. Computers can be upgraded cheaply, but you will likely keep the interface longer.
PRS SC245
Various Strats
Polytone Mini Brute
Koch Studiotone XL
Quilter OD200, 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
#32
i've been using Ubuntu Studio for a few years. i've had no problems with it, and all my gear works out of the box (ie. no drivers needed) with ALSA.
latency is super low, and the communities are great, workstations and applications are quite nice, so yeah i'm quite happy.

it's not for everyone though. i know people who've tried it and walked away without every trying to get used to it.
#33
pro tools 8.0.3 patch was released a few days ago -- works fine on snow leopard.

this argument is stupid. you can record, mix, master, compose, arrange, everything on either mac or pc platforms. all of the big studios in LA use macs...but i don't think there's more than maybe 5 guys on this forum who even do the type of work for OS choice to matter.
#34
Quote by climhazzard
pro tools 8.0.3 patch was released a few days ago -- works fine on snow leopard.

this argument is stupid. you can record, mix, master, compose, arrange, everything on either mac or pc platforms. all of the big studios in LA use macs...but i don't think there's more than maybe 5 guys on this forum who even do the type of work for OS choice to matter.


First of all, my bad, I'm not totally on the ball with Pro Tools because I don't run it at home(yet).

Secondly, huge +1.
#35
Quote by climhazzard
i don't think there's more than maybe 5 guys on this forum who even do the type of work for OS choice to matter.


I think thats hits it on the head here.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp