#1
1. do we actually have melodic and harmonic pentatonic minor scale?

2. the basic triad formula - R-3-5, is it only applicable to octative scales (normal 7 notes scales)? do we have and if yes what is the forumla for triads for pentatonic scales?

thx
tired of finger speed exercise and turned into slow blues improvisation lately
#2
Quote by molala2
2. the basic triad formula - R-3-5, is it only applicable to octative scales (normal 7 notes scales)? do we have and if yes what is the forumla for triads for pentatonic scales?

thx



the 1 3 5 formula can be applied to any scale. since your major and minor pentatonic are just based off of the major or minor scales you can still use the two notes that were left out if you need to.
#3
Quote by molala2
1. do we actually have melodic and harmonic pentatonic minor scale?



Yeah sure, just change the notes in the regular pentatonic... Although you never play a 6th in the minor pentatonic scale so the melodic minor would sound the same as the harmonic minor pentatonic, and only differ when descending.

When playing Em pentatonic, you're playing the notes E-G-A-B-D-E. If you want harmonic pentatonic, change the D for D# and you're done.
#4
1. Yes

2. Yes, here's the formula-

WH, W, W, WH, W, WH, W

WH- Whole and Half

W- Whole
[img]http://pix.motivatedphotos.com/2008/10/24/633604588429325324-annoyance.jpg[/img]

Billy Mays is definitely gonna give me nightmares now.

Quote by xxGUITARZER0xx
honestly no

but i just did the pallet town theme song cause someone wanted that

Quote by speakers
all of the above
#5
Quote by molala2
1. do we actually have melodic and harmonic pentatonic minor scale?

2. the basic triad formula - R-3-5, is it only applicable to octative scales (normal 7 notes scales)? do we have and if yes what is the forumla for triads for pentatonic scales?

thx


1) No

2) yes
shred is gaudy music
#7
In response to your second question here's the thing to keep in mind.

The major scale is the basis for pretty much all reference in that numeric notation. So for example when you write out a scale such as the minor scale (1 2 ♭3 4 5 ♭6 ♭7) you are showing the scale degrees as to how they relate to the major scale. When you write the harmonic minor scale in numeric form (1 2 ♭3 4 5 ♭6 7) you once again show how it relates to the scale degrees of the major scale.

The major scale is THE reference when spelling chords or scales.

So when you have R 3 5 as a chord formula it always refers to the major scale. Chord construction isn't necessarily derived from specific scales. Chord construction is distinct from harmonizing a scale. The method of "Harmonizing" a scale simply gives you the specific chords that can be made from using only the notes of that scale. But this method is distinct from chord construction which shows you how to build any chord.

Either way the chord formulas will always refer to the major scale because the formulas for the scales you're harmonizing will always refer to the major scale.
Si
#8
Quote by KoenDercksen
Why not, because you've never heard of them?


Yep, thats why
shred is gaudy music
#9
Quote by KoenDercksen
Why not, because you've never heard of them?


The point of the pentatonic scales is to have easy scales to solo with. There are no "avoid tones" in the major and minor pentatonic scales. That is why the two scales have gained so much popularity, and have their own names. They do not, however work to create progressions. Thus, songs aren't in the keys of pentatonic scales.

Sure, you could call [1, ♭3, 4, 5, 7] a "harmonic pentatonic minor", but since that's not a very useful scale since the ♮7 is dissonant over many of the chords, and thus it can't be used for mindless improvising. If the player is actually going to think what tones will work over what chords, to use that scale, then they would also be able to think enough to add the other avoid tones (2, and ♭6) to their soloing. As thus, it very rarely (if ever) gets used, and thus does not have a commonly accepted name.
#10
Writing a melody using the pentatonic isn't really "mindless" unless you are just wanking around. To come up with something interesting and catchy you need to be mindful of what you're doing. But yeah I get what you're saying.

If you recall that "How Music Works" series that was linked in numerous threads over the last six months or so showed how so many different cultures throughout the world had traditional songs that were all based on the pentatonic scale even though they didn't subscribe to the same model of "music theory". This led the guy to ask, is the pentatonic something that is ingrained in our subconscious [in the same way as linguistic syntax ]?
Si
#11
Quote by 20Tigers
Writing a melody using the pentatonic isn't really "mindless" unless you are just wanking around. To come up with something interesting and catchy you need to be mindful of what you're doing. But yeah I get what you're saying.

If you recall that "How Music Works" series that was linked in numerous threads over the last six months or so showed how so many different cultures throughout the world had traditional songs that were all based on the pentatonic scale even though they didn't subscribe to the same model of "music theory". This led the guy to ask, is the pentatonic something that is ingrained in our subconscious [in the same way as linguistic syntax ]?


OK. Then you could make the argument that the major and minor pentatonics are used because they are the most consonant for making pleasant melodies, while the ♮7 of the harmonic minor, does not make for that, and thus the "harmonic pentatonic minor" is not a commonly accepted term.
#12
I wasn't trying to disagree with you or make some kind of counter argument as much as discuss ideas. The pentatonic is a pretty "safe" scale. I was just pointing out that you can do clever and interesting things with it that do take thought and skill. But you can also use it mindlessly and remain relatively safe. I was also offering another idea as to why it is a safe scale - namely that we may well be predisposed to have a natural liking of the pentatonic scale.

And I found it an interesting question - is an appreciation for the pentatonic scale some kind of in built human trait? Are we hardwired to like the pentatonic scales?

As for the harmonic minor pentatonic thing - I wasn't going to touch that one because I don't know the answer. All I got to say on that is that a four semitone step in a scale followed by a half step is a pretty interesting concept.
Si