#1
Hi all,

I'm an intermediate guitar player that never really memorized the notes on a fretboard and as result, I feel that my playing has plateaud. So.....as a result im going back and refreshing myself on scales, modes and various theory.

I've been told that memorizing the fretboard is a must in order for one to go from a beginner-intermediate to an advanced player.

So...when should I have the fretboard memorized? can I do it as I go along? or should I have memorized way before re-learning scales, modes and arpeggios?

also, to what extent should a fretboard be memorized?
Should a player instantaneously know frets 1-12?
Should a player just focus on learning the inlays and work from there?

I know the notes on a fretboard, but it takes me about 5 seconds to figure it out.

thanks all. I've been playing on and off for 10 years and I just woke up one day realizing that I know nothing about guitar.
#2
As Soon As Possible.

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#3
It's actually really easy to learn. Just start on the E and A strings, where like most chords are formed, and just take it from there. It'll come to you in time really.
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#4
Remember what notes are where on every string from frets 1-12. As long as you know that every fret after that is the same order as 1-12 you're fine.
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#5
all you really need to know is frets 1-5 because if your on the 10th fret of the E string thats the same as the fifth fret of the A. or the A13=D8=G3 you can always break it down into one of the first 5 frets. Also if your near the 12 its easy to find your way arond like 10th fret is one whole note below the open string E10=D
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Last edited by the_perdestrian at Nov 27, 2009,
#6
Quote by the_perdestrian
all you really need to know is frets 1-5 because if your on the 10th fret of the E string thats the same as the fifth fret of the A. or the A13=D8=G3 you can always break it down into one of the first 5 frets. Also if your near the 12 its easy to find your way arond like 10th fret is one whole note below the open string E10=D



yup, 10th fret is easy cause I just have to think about a whole step below EADGBE. Same with 2nd fret being a step higher. but even that process is not really memorization, but more so musical math. Im guessing memorization will just come naturally.

So heres a follow up question to everyone. when playing your practice scales, are you mentally thinking about every note you're hitting?
#7
i've been playing electric guitar since like february and it didn't took me more than a couple months to memorize the position. Of course if i'm not looking it's always 100% accurate but as soon as i learn a lick i play the same when sitting, standind or with eyes closed.

Just keep playing
#8
Personally, I don't find knowing all the notes on a fretboard to be that useful. Knowing their relationships and intervals all across the fretboard is much more useful. It seems more like taking the middle-man out.
#9
Quote by JELIFISH19
Personally, I don't find knowing all the notes on a fretboard to be that useful. Knowing their relationships and intervals all across the fretboard is much more useful. It seems more like taking the middle-man out.

QFT. Knowing intervals and relationships is more important than knowing the notes IMO. But at least start with knowing all the notes on the 6th and 5th strings can help, as with knowing all the notes on each string up to the 4th or 5th frets.