#1
Out of everything I'm involved in, none of it is even close to going to the studio. Still, I'd like to know how it goes.

I've heard everybody say that drums records first; do the drums record with a metronome/click track, or does it work better to record the band playing together before hand (just a low quality, out of studio one, off of a camera or MP3 Player or something of that nature), and then have the drummer play along with that recording, and record what he plays?

Also, do you generally bring your own drumset, or use the one there, or is that entirely up to each individual studio?

My questions are all about drums, because the group I have the most faith in is the one I drum in.
#2
drums are tracked first, generally they are tracked with a click or they do a scratch track where everything else is played live but on the drums are recorded and then they overdub everything else. that is usually the band/producer's discretion. and typically you bring your own drum set you are familiar with or use the studio one if you like the sound better.
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#3
With my band, we recorded drums, then bas, rhythm guitar, lead guitar then vocals.

When we recorded the drums, we had a click track, but also had the bass player and vocalist in the mixing room playing through the drummer's headphones just so he knew when the changes in the song were coming up. It worked pretty well. We only ever had to re-do a song once or twice.
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#4
Awesome, stressful, amazing, fun, expensive, headache inducing, rewarding.

Drums are almost always done first, other than scratch guitar or vocal. You will almost always record to a click, but still record the songs as demos beforehand so everyone knows the songs perfectly. And it depends how nice your drums are and what the studio has.

Some engineers will actually just use protools and use virtual triggers to match your drums, so only the cymbals really matter that much. I would say it is best to get the best drums you can possibly use and not do drum replacements because I personally hate their sound. Most people can't tell the difference though.
#5
Quote by -NOFX-
With my band, we recorded drums, then bas, rhythm guitar, lead guitar then vocals.

When we recorded the drums, we had a click track, but also had the bass player and vocalist in the mixing room playing through the drummer's headphones just so he knew when the changes in the song were coming up. It worked pretty well. We only ever had to re-do a song once or twice.
Why wouldn't you have the guitarist in too? Too hard to coordinate? Still, I like the idea, I'll have to remember that.
#6
Quote by herby190
Why wouldn't you have the guitarist in too? Too hard to coordinate? Still, I like the idea, I'll have to remember that.

We did for one of the songs, but only cos it was necessary really. Didn't wanna have too much in the drummer's headphones so he could hear himself too. And because we didn't wanna cram the mixing room full of gear and people.
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#7
You will probably find that having guitar tracks in your headphones really clutters up the sound unless they are way in the background.

Knowing your songs perfectly so that you can record without hearing anything but the click is the best thing. It will give you the best takes and make you better at drums.
#8
Quote by CODE
You will probably find that having guitar tracks in your headphones really clutters up the sound unless they are way in the background.

Knowing your songs perfectly so that you can record without hearing anything but the click is the best thing. It will give you the best takes and make you better at drums.
Guess that means I should probably get a metronome to practice with.
#9
When I recorded drum tracks for my band I had a click track going and the rest of the band going through my headphones. Was easy as, didn't have to re-record anything. Only thing was I had to sit around for hours waiting for the others to get their stuff done hahaha. It was still a great time =D
#10
Pre-production comes first. This is where you set the tempo changes and get everything lined up and ready to go. Then you get a basic basic rhythm guitar track and a simple vocal track. These are used as a guide, along with a metronome, for the drummer to play to. After this, bass is usually done in order that it can line up with the kick, and then guitars are done, followed by synths, electronics etc and then vocals. Some people do the real guitars first instead of just a ghost track, and then base the drums and bass guitars and synth etc off of that.
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#11
short answer: it all depends. depends on what you work best with, depends on what sound you like, depends on the studio and engineers, depends on price, etc etc etc.

one of the best pieces of advice i've ever gotten when going into a studio was this: pre-production is FREE-production. it doesn't cost any money for you to figure things out ahead of time. it doesn't cost any money for you to give the studio a quick call to find out about their gear, to find out if you can set up before downbeat, etc. if you work best with a scratch track, make a cheap scratch track at home (use MIDI if you really want to stay on time). if you do best live, do it live.
#12
Yes, metronome is a big help. And pre-pro. They might seem annoying, but it pays off.
#13
In the studio, no-one can hear you scream.

Before you go in though, prepare like climhazzard suggests, lot of metronome work (specially if you're in a metal, rock or any commercial sounding band).

Ideally each individual member of the band should be able to play all their parts to a metronome on their own.
#14
Quote by CODE
Awesome, stressful, amazing, fun, expensive, headache inducing, rewarding.

Drums are almost always done first, other than scratch guitar or vocal. You will almost always record to a click, but still record the songs as demos beforehand so everyone knows the songs perfectly. And it depends how nice your drums are and what the studio has.

Some engineers will actually just use protools and use virtual triggers to match your drums, so only the cymbals really matter that much. I would say it is best to get the best drums you can possibly use and not do drum replacements because I personally hate their sound. Most people can't tell the difference though.



doubt you could either.
#15
this is how it goes on a pro level if you are not working on a pro level some of these steps may not be needed like re-heading the drums and such

if you are working with an engineer/producer

-PREPRODUCTION-
day1. rough set up of the mics and the drums and guitars etc.
track all the songs you want to do in a live way no click track usually
day2. sit down with the producer and re-arrnage/talkabout/ the tracks you just did
day3. finally get the OK on everything from all memembers...later that day go to a music shop and buy new heads. new strings. new everything you need batteries etc etc. tubes, whatever

-if you do not have a producer ignore those steps-

-TRACKING
day1. show up early with your drums. either with new heads on or your old ones. let the engineer see what he thinks of the cymbals/drums and if they are gonna have to be replaced with possibly the studios cymbals,toms,snare, what not, now time to move on to step 2. re skinning your drums and tunning. remember that drums need to be in the room for 24 hours before you can really tracking em, this way they can adjust to the atmosphere which might need alot of re-tunning

be pateint with you engineer he's gonna try to mic up everything in diffrent ways to see whats best and what is gonna sound the best. they might offer using their drum kit even. trust your engineer (usually)

day2.click track writting if you already did this in pre pro (which you usually will) start tracking rough guitars via amp sim or whatever the drummer needs for cue changes

run over all the songs with the drummer over and over, then retune, re mic, whatev it needs till it sounds ****ing epic at the end of the day

day3-? drum tracking usually takes about a 2 days to a week.

- NOW THAT YOUR DRUMS ARE DONE-
a. the engineer is going to have them edited which could take a few weeks or take 1 day
b.he is possibly going to go ahead and midi them
c. he won't do squat if its not needed

=GUITAR TRACKING-
what to look forward too
a.retunning after every trake
b.punching in
c. new strings..alot
d.patience haha

after the drums are edited super tight you can hear your songs really becoming studio quality

there are many ways of tracking guitar here are a few
a. just micing it up and going for it
b. direct in (monitor amp sim) for re-amping or maybe you wana use the ampsims
c. both a/b

-bass-
new strings play tight

i'll finish the rest with vocals
#16
CatharsisStudio - very informative! Hope someday (before I'm dead and gone) to actually visit a real studio but that was a great "virtual tour"
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#17
I can' overstate this enough that you really need to start working with a click track before getting into the studio if you plan on using one (or even if you don't sometimes, a lot of producers will insist on you using one because it makes digital editing easier) because if you arent used to playing with one, it can really screw you up. Also depending on the studio and producer you may want to try recording live.
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#18
Quote by CatharsisStudio
doubt you could either.

Good post, ass****.
#19
As a drummer, what you should ask yourself before entering the studio is how much your band is going to back you to let you play and foot the bill of the extensive number of takes to get a working track, instead of hiring the studio's regular session drummer who will record 10 tracks in a day, and let the band save studio time for the guitar players to try out the latest distortion fx and add additional layered tracks, and the singer try out the latest harmonizers, sub-bass and harmonic enhancers.

That's how much you should worry about your playing and tightening up your tracks before entering the studio, and how much of the band's boss responsibilities you should be sharing with the other bosses of the band to make your voice count and avoid being sidelined in the studio.
Last edited by ColdGin at Nov 29, 2009,
#21
Quote by CatharsisStudio
LOL yeah. defiantly

Drummers: get to be best ****ing friends with your band before you hit the studio


Or just threaten to walk out if they try to sideline you, I see that happen all the time, and it usually works, since drummers are really hard to permanently replace.
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