#1
hey there.
technically i've been playing guitar for a little over a year, but I didn't really get into it until 5 months ago. I would say that I'm a pretty okay player for 5 months.

I've been reading about increasing speed and the same things always come up, "economy of motion" "make these movements economical", stuff like that.

So my main question is, if I devote all my practice time to focusing on doing exercises with a metronome while keeping my economy of motion, will this bring a good result?

I mean, playing EVERYTHING I ever play slowly that I use the least amount of effort and tension and motion, while keeping time with a metronome.
I like metal

Gear (still working on it ) :

Epiphone SG G-310
Marshall MG10cd
Boss MT-2 Metal zone

Quote by DiSTuRBeD -26-
^listen to him


Metalli-freak
#3
^ I agree. You can start at a speed you feel comfortable playing and gradually speed up the metronome as you improve. As long as you're keeping good technique your speed will improve, little by little.
#4
thanks for the video!

Quote by The Raven
^ I agree. You can start at a speed you feel comfortable playing and gradually speed up the metronome as you improve. As long as you're keeping good technique your speed will improve, little by little.


by starting at a speed I feel comfortable with, do you mean for a specific exercise?

so by keeping good technique with everything, would my general speed increase little by little?
I like metal

Gear (still working on it ) :

Epiphone SG G-310
Marshall MG10cd
Boss MT-2 Metal zone

Quote by DiSTuRBeD -26-
^listen to him


Metalli-freak
#5
Quote by metal_shredder0
thanks for the video!


by starting at a speed I feel comfortable with, do you mean for a specific exercise?

so by keeping good technique with everything, would my general speed increase little by little?


Yeah, doing exercises with the metronome will help your speed if you increase it in small intervals. Trying to shred right out of the gate usually develops bad technique, which is why I was saying you needed to take your time and try to use good technique during all of your playing, not just the exercises.
#6
Well, lets say it like this is how i do it hehe.

I set my metronome at 80bpm regardless of exercise. untill i can do it 100% flawlessly. Then i burst and do it as fast as i can without the metronome just untill i get sappy and a bit cramped or tired lol, then i raise the bpm by 4 each time i do it and keep doing it a bit faster and then i burst again.

My brother is a drummer this is the method he uses when hes learning something absolutely new, theres nothing like a metronome to get better and the results to that in my playing has been godly!
"RAWR WIRES >:O"
One more kiss... One more touch...
I miss you, wont you hug me just one last time?

Twitter!!~ Follow Re-follow :P
#7
Quote by The Raven
Yeah, doing exercises with the metronome will help your speed if you increase it in small intervals. Trying to shred right out of the gate usually develops bad technique, which is why I was saying you needed to take your time and try to use good technique during all of your playing, not just the exercises.



yeah i was reading a similar post that said the same think you just said.
so just focus on making all my playing full of good technique and I'll be well on my way to shred-hood?
I like metal

Gear (still working on it ) :

Epiphone SG G-310
Marshall MG10cd
Boss MT-2 Metal zone

Quote by DiSTuRBeD -26-
^listen to him


Metalli-freak
#8
Yes. Be accurate and articulate. Learn to accent notes when you're playing.
Focus on what you are bad at, and make an exercise around it. If you're bad at 3nps runs, inside picking, and a certain finger pattern, for example, then make your own exercise with those things in it (sometimes you can't, but usually you can). The next step would be to put those skills into a musical context.
#9
Quote by tenfold
Yes. Be accurate and articulate. Learn to accent notes when you're playing.
Focus on what you are bad at, and make an exercise around it. If you're bad at 3nps runs, inside picking, and a certain finger pattern, for example, then make your own exercise with those things in it (sometimes you can't, but usually you can). The next step would be to put those skills into a musical context.


Thanks!

what do you mean by accenting notes when I'm playing?
I like metal

Gear (still working on it ) :

Epiphone SG G-310
Marshall MG10cd
Boss MT-2 Metal zone

Quote by DiSTuRBeD -26-
^listen to him


Metalli-freak
#10
Say you're practicing a 3nps lick in 3 octaves to a metronome at semiquavers. Try to accent every metronome click, so the lick has a pulse, every 4th note will be louder and it won't sound like an exercise.
This will also help when you hit high speeds and are playing too fast to know how many notes you're playing. You can just use that skill of being able to accent every 4th note and just sync that up to the click of the metronome knowing you're playing 3 notes between every accented note instead of trying to count how many are between each beat.

Maybe I can't explain well, if so, check out JP's Rock Discipline.
#11
it might
that's just a myth though
people say there is no shortcut to being a guitar god
you just have to practice practice practice
and go slow and use a metronome
well if that were true then that would be the shortcut
you'll probably very slowly notice an increase in speed and eventually you'll hit a plateau and it will suck.
you should instead learn and master every different way of holding and moving the pick, and play really hard things with lots of string crossings. practice that stuff with accurate rhythm, of course. the pick should never stop moving, just change direction and move slower or faster to get from string to string. you'll have to play really challenging exercises with perfect rhythm. you may need to only play 2 notes per second to keep he notes evenly spaced and your picking motion fluid, so don't go any faster than that if it isn't perfect.
#13
alright, thanks for the input everyone!

also, what really defines correct practice?
I like metal

Gear (still working on it ) :

Epiphone SG G-310
Marshall MG10cd
Boss MT-2 Metal zone

Quote by DiSTuRBeD -26-
^listen to him


Metalli-freak
#14
Sitting down and concentrating on specific problem areas, compared to sitting in front of the TV doing finger permutations or something.
Making a goal sheet and problem area list would be the best way. Give each problem a certain amount of time, the worse you are at a technique the more time you should give it.
#15
what really defines correct practice?


Using the right approach for the job. Using effective learning methods.

so just focus on making all my playing full of good technique and I'll be well on my way to shred-hood?


"just" put in a few thousand hours work and you'll be able to play fast, yep.

Bear in mind you may want to do stuff other than just bump the metronome scorecard - I think if you can get about 2 hours a day and make technique no more than half of that then that's a recipe for serious improvement without forgetting about theory and fun.
#16
Quote by Freepower
Bear in mind you may want to do stuff other than just bump the metronome scorecard - I think if you can get about 2 hours a day and make technique no more than half of that then that's a recipe for serious improvement without forgetting about theory and fun.


Okay, but let's say I wanted to start minimizing extra movement and keep finger independence, wouldn't I kind of have to start from scratch and make everything I play focused on those subjects?

or would I just practice finger independence exercises for a bit and then revert back to my original playing?
I like metal

Gear (still working on it ) :

Epiphone SG G-310
Marshall MG10cd
Boss MT-2 Metal zone

Quote by DiSTuRBeD -26-
^listen to him


Metalli-freak
#17
There's no point cutting out playing because you're practicing.

Remember - practicing is when you work to improve your playing.

Playing - whatever you want to do.

There's no way you can start "perfect" and "build that up" to whatever standard you have in your head (Satch? Vai? Lane? Holdsworth?) because there are so many walls and plateaus and false horizons that you can't anticipate everything and besides -

Do you really want to clock thousands of hours (years) of practice without doing any playing?
#18
Quote by Freepower
There's no point cutting out playing because you're practicing.

Remember - practicing is when you work to improve your playing.

Playing - whatever you want to do.

There's no way you can start "perfect" and "build that up" to whatever standard you have in your head (Satch? Vai? Lane? Holdsworth?) because there are so many walls and plateaus and false horizons that you can't anticipate everything and besides -

Do you really want to clock thousands of hours (years) of practice without doing any playing?



Alright I get you, so the practicing on technique will slowly integrate into my playing in time?
I like metal

Gear (still working on it ) :

Epiphone SG G-310
Marshall MG10cd
Boss MT-2 Metal zone

Quote by DiSTuRBeD -26-
^listen to him


Metalli-freak
#20
Quote by metal_shredder0
Alright I get you, so the practicing on technique will slowly integrate into my playing in time?

Definitely; and this has helped me so much.
When I practice, I generally find a song I want to play (If there isn't one I'm already working on), and start playing it. When I mess up, I'll do one of two things.
1: Work slowly and build up to speed that specific spot.
2: Figure out what techniques are needed for that specific spot, and work on those.

Right now, I do more of number 2 than number 1, since I'm still a beginner (In my eyes at least), and I think it may be what you need to do as well.

Good luck!
#21
okay thank you everyone so much! i really appreciate it
I like metal

Gear (still working on it ) :

Epiphone SG G-310
Marshall MG10cd
Boss MT-2 Metal zone

Quote by DiSTuRBeD -26-
^listen to him


Metalli-freak