#1
I was playing and I got bored and asked how you make a sus chord to double check if I was right. I thought it would be where you take out the third of a triad and replace it with a different note from within the scale.

ex. C D G or C F G

She said that it would be something like this:

C E G D


Correct me if I'm wrong but that isn't a sus chord. That is an "add" chord.
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Last edited by RockGuitar92 at Nov 29, 2009,
#2
thats an add9 chord
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#3
Quote by victoryaloy
thats an add9 chord

That's kinda what I said. I just don't get how a music teacher can **** up on something like that. haha
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#4
yeah.. thats pretty bad..
did she give you an example of how it would be use?
Quote by joshjhasarrived
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#5
Nope. She even said she wasn't exactly sure what it was but from what I can tell a sus chord is pretty common. Especially on guitar.
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#6
yeah.. on piano too! Most of my playing is chord charts(piano and guitar) and sus chords come up quite a bit! they arent always use in traditional "sus" form but they still come up!
Quote by joshjhasarrived
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#7
Quote by RockGuitar92
Nope. She even said she wasn't exactly sure what it was but from what I can tell a sus chord is pretty common. Especially on guitar.


I had a conversation with my piano teacher the other day and apparently sus chords arn't really seen in piano music, he had no idea what a sus chord was, he only knew what the suspension technqiue was that is used in music.

Anyhow, a sus chord is a chord that takes the 3rd and brings it down a step or up a step to the next scale degree.

sus2 making it the 2nd note in the scale, and sus4 making it the 4th.

an add chord normally suggests you are ADDing a note on top of the notes already being used.

So an add9 chord would be 1-3-5-9.
#8
Quote by Guitarfreak777
I had a conversation with my piano teacher the other day and apparently sus chords arn't really seen in piano music, he had no idea what a sus chord was, he only knew what the suspension technqiue was that is used in music.

Anyhow, a sus chord is a chord that takes the 3rd and brings it down a step or up a step to the next scale degree.

sus2 making it the 2nd note in the scale, and sus4 making it the 4th.

an add chord normally suggests you are ADDing a note on top of the notes already being used.

So an add9 chord would be 1-3-5-9.

Yeah it isn't but I believe she also teaches the music theory class sometimes.
Quote by Tyler Durden
It's only after we've lost everything that we're free to do anything.

Erowid
#9
Im assuming she's a classically trained pianist. Suspensions in classical music are alot different to to modern music.

In classical music a suspension involved preparing a note in a previous chord, playing it in the next chord and then resolving it.
#10
Quote by griffRG7321

In classical music a suspension involved preparing a note in a previous chord, playing it in the next chord and then resolving it.


And maybe this didn't originate with Bach, but it was certainly formalized by Bach.

In any case, I can't believe that any music teacher - regardless of instrument - worth his or her salt wouldn't know what a suspension was. You know... seeing as a lot of piano players play works by Bach....

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#11
Quote by axemanchris
And maybe this didn't originate with Bach, but it was certainly formalized by Bach.

In any case, I can't believe that any music teacher - regardless of instrument - worth his or her salt wouldn't know what a suspension was. You know... seeing as a lot of piano players play works by Bach....

CT

I know. I lost faith in her teaching more and more. haha
Quote by Tyler Durden
It's only after we've lost everything that we're free to do anything.

Erowid
#12
And maybe this didn't originate with Bach, but it was certainly formalized by Bach. In any case, I can't believe that any music teacher - regardless of instrument - worth his or her salt wouldn't know what a suspension was. You know... seeing as a lot of piano players play works by Bach.... CT


As it was said before, classical theory write suspensions differently to jazz/rock players. What she said was actually correct because in classical theory the use of the 2nd or 9th is used as a suspension as well.

So yes she is correct. Just not in the way jazz/rock players understand them.

http://www.tsmp.org/theory/lias/pdf/quickfacts.pdf

That's a quick reference sheet to some classical theory.
#13
My theory is pretty fluent, actually, but thanks for the link. I have a degree in this stuff. 8)

Part of what makes a suspension a suspension is how it is set up and how it resolves. Thus, you can have a sus 2 that occurs, effectively, a 9th above the root (in a typical four-part chorale, the bass might sing the root, while the alto sings the sus2, for instance). If it is set up and resolved - behaves - like a suspension, then it is a suspension.

AFAIK, it becomes a 9th when it occurs in a chord where it is an extension of the seventh, and is not set up nor resolved as a suspension. (my degree is in classical guitar..... not jazz) That is, it is used as a flavour within the chord.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.