#1
I've always wondered how witnessing someone who is incredibly gifted at an instruments affects you.

For example, you have been practicing your butt off everyday and been playing for 10 + years and you walk into a guitar store and see a 16 year old kid who has been playing for 3 years shred and play circles around you. When you ask him how he does it, he goes "eh I just picked up the guitar and played, it was not that difficult to get a handle on scales and technique"

I grew up with a kid who was a piano prodigy, he would practice only about an hour a day and win statewide competitions, while others he was competing against would practice much less. He also did not use sheet music much, he just listened to the piece and played it by ear, and I am talking about extremely difficult concertos (liszt etc).

I remember that after watching him play, I would first get envious, but then realize seeing someone play like that motivates me to practice even more. In fact, he is a good reason why I have gotten as far as I have gotten today as a musician....


So just wondering your guys' thoughts on this. Does it make you want to go home and immediately sell your guitar on ebay, does it motivate you, or does it just make you say...eh good for him?
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#2
It usually just makes me curious. I've made good friends by going into say Guitar Center and seeing someone play and approached them with a simple 'Wow your good, are you self taught or...'
So I don't get it, why doesn't anyone like Squiers?

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#3
Quote by psychosylocibin
I've always wondered how witnessing someone who is incredibly gifted at an instruments affects you.

For example, you have been practicing your butt off everyday and been playing for 10 + years and you walk into a guitar store and see a 16 year old kid who has been playing for 3 years shred and play circles around you. When you ask him how he does it, he goes "eh I just picked up the guitar and played, it was not that difficult to get a handle on scales and technique"

I grew up with a kid who was a piano prodigy, he would practice only about an hour a day and win statewide competitions, while others he was competing against would practice much less. He also did not use sheet music much, he just listened to the piece and played it by ear, and I am talking about extremely difficult concertos (liszt etc).

I remember that after watching him play, I would first get envious, but then realize seeing someone play like that motivates me to practice even more. In fact, he is a good reason why I have gotten as far as I have gotten today as a musician....


So just wondering your guys' thoughts on this. Does it make you want to go home and immediately sell your guitar on ebay, does it motivate you, or does it just make you say...eh good for him?


Do you mean much more?
On topic: it inspires me to go practice more
#4
I am thankful there are people like that in the world, they can often to great things for music.

I will never be as good as a prodigy because I am not one, so I will never compare myself to one.
#5
seeing anyone better than me inspires me, but seeing a prodigy is somewhat discouraging because i know no matter how much i play i will never equal them, and it makes me wonder of i ever could make it in music.
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#6
"It often happens that I wake up at night and begin to think about a serious problem and decide I must tell the pope about it. Then I wake up completely and remember that I am the pope."


---Pope John XXIII
#7
It doesn't really make me do anything besides complement him/her.
I know that anyone could get to the same level in a short amount of time as well if they really wanted to and approached it correctly, most people just make excuses though like "I guess I don't have the natural talent." or even one that was posted here "I'll never be that good." When people say that and believe it, well that's what they get.
#8
Depends on how they act. If they're modest I like 'em, if they're stuck up and feel like the world owns them something for their musical talent, fuck 'em.

I spent my time in highschool with two prodigies, one bass and one trumpet. I play bass so I would always listen the bassists advice. He got a free ride to Julliard.
The trumpet player is a premadonna. He's nice to talk to, but when he gets on stage all the attention better be on him. He's a senior this year.
#9
What would you consider as a prodigy anyway? Does having extremely ambitious parents that force you to practice make you a prodigy? Or being able to play a complicated piece by ear? Is it training and exercise or a natural talent that defines a prodigy?

The popular opinion on a prodigy is technical skill, but as we all know that's but one dimension of musicality (as in this case). I feel the term prodigy is obsolete nowadays, and I would wait to praise someone for their accomplishments until they've reached their prime, which isn't at the age of 10. Be advised though that I've based my conception of prodigies on the media, and I don't really know anyone (let alone a 10-year-old) with an exceptional skill at their instrument.
#10
Anyone can play someone else's piece give a few weeks. How many ten year old "prodigies" can WRITE an emotionally moving piece of music? after all a prodigy writes their own stuff right?


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#11
Quote by tenfold
It doesn't really make me do anything besides complement him/her.
I know that anyone could get to the same level in a short amount of time as well if they really wanted to and approached it correctly, most people just make excuses though like "I guess I don't have the natural talent." or even one that was posted here "I'll never be that good." When people say that and believe it, well that's what they get.

With a quote like this, I'm forced to ask, how many musical prodigies do you actually know?

I know a girl who I met in year 7 (at the age of eleven) who had already done grade 8 on violin (she actually did grade 8 at the age of 9 or something). I've know a basoonist who got into the National Youth Orchestra at the age of 15.

I've seen people with extraordinary ability play and they have put tons of work into their music but so have I, and so have lots of other people, without getting to their level. The thing that separates us is natural talent. Any music teacher will tell you that some begginers can pick things up in minutes while others take weeks to get to the same level. The difference is natural talent.

Also, anyone who thinks becoming a musical prodigy is just a case of giving your 3 year old an instrument and making them practise needs to try and teach a very young child. At that sort of age few children will be able to learn and benefit from learning from that age but the few who have exceptional ability in music will be the ones who do.
#14
Quote by psychosylocibin
Does it make you want to go home and immediately sell your guitar on ebay, does it motivate you, or does it just make you say...eh good for him?


Seeing someone play well, regardless or their age or status as a "prodigy", is something that I would generally enjoy & be inspired by. IMO, if it makes you want to go sell your guitar, you need to rethink your reasons for playing guitar in the 1st place.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Nov 28, 2009,
#15
plenty of people can sit down and play their favorite malmsteen lick at twice the actual speed. But, at least for me. Being a good guitarist is about musicality and being able to play with other musicians... after all harmonic minor at 200BPM isn't going to get you very far.
I think it's safe to say if you went up to said ''prodigy'' in guitar store and asked them to play a I IV V G blues, they wouldn't have the foggiest.
Last edited by Zanon at Nov 28, 2009,
#16
Most prodigies nowadays that I've seen don't and can't write their own music. They can only play other people's. To me that doesn't make them a musician. They are simply a guitarist or pianist or whatever.
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#17
Quote by Hobble


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#18
Well, there's playing a piece and there's playing a piece.

For example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUx4t4W4eVY and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rA2h1lQNOsc

They're hitting the notes, but their phrasing and dynamics are nothing like as deep and considered as an adult who's been playing for ten or twenty years.

Example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubVVSWHkxs8

Yes, he has been playing since he was five or whatever, but I'll bet he didn't aquire that maturity until at least his mid-teens.

Of course, there are plenty of adults who have been playing for ages and haven't got that touch because they haven't been thinking about it; they've just been "playing" their instrument. But age is never everything, and despite the wow-factor of a child doing what an adult does, child prodigies just haven't lived long enough to play music properly.
#19
Quote by RockGuitar92
Most prodigies nowadays that I've seen don't and can't write their own music. They can only play other people's. To me that doesn't make them a musician. They are simply a guitarist or pianist or whatever.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4QB7ugJnHgs&feature=channel

So Concert pianists ( or any instrumentalists) who have devoted their lives to mastering their instrument like her aren't musicians because they don't write their own music?
#20
Makes me wanna try and kick their ass as hard as I can. I get inspired.
[img]http://pix.motivatedphotos.com/2008/10/24/633604588429325324-annoyance.jpg[/img]

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honestly no

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#21
i cry
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#22
Quote by blue_strat
. despite the wow-factor of a child doing what an adult does, child prodigies just haven't lived long enough to play music properly.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HgZZSN3-Ig8

Id say this music is played "properly", as well as beautifully.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Nov 28, 2009,
#23
never met one honestly. ive met good players, but none that were:

-younger & better than me
-played less time than me and were better
-able to play something i wasnt able to figure out.

ive met a bunch of players who were better than me but they usually were people who have been playing longer than me. even if they are slightly younger than me, they usually have been playing a lot longer than me.

honestly, not to toot my own horn here, but when i was starting out, i was kind of that guy the OP was talking about. i was able to get a good tone and feel and played smoothly early on. people at school would ask me what i was doing but honestly, i just played. i was also a good improviser. i think back in school too many kids focused on learning "cool songs" and i was up in my room improvising over SRV or clapton or whoever.

Quote by GuitarMunky
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HgZZSN3-Ig8

Id say this music is played "properly", as well as beautifully.

thats really good. usually kids tend to sound a bit choppy but his notes rang out nicely in that.
Last edited by Blind In 1 Ear at Nov 28, 2009,
#24
Quote by griffRG7321
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4QB7ugJnHgs&feature=channel

So Concert pianists ( or any instrumentalists) who have devoted their lives to mastering their instrument like her aren't musicians because they don't write their own music?


I don't believe so. No.

A musician to me is someone who can actually write their own not just play someone else's. I don't care how anyone sees it.
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#25
to me, a prodigy is just a musician that happens to become great very quick. I wouldn't give up my hours of practice because it keeps me interested and aspiring. If I could be Shawn Lane in three years, I'd play three years and give up because you'd have reached an impossible hurtle.

EDIT-A better question is do you consider Asians musical prodigies? I mean, most of them do practice a lot and are forced to study music all day, so...
Last edited by hippieboy444 at Nov 28, 2009,
#26
Quote by RockGuitar92
I don't believe so. No.

A musician to me is someone who can actually write their own not just play someone else's. I don't care how anyone sees it.

whos to say they cant though? you are assuming someone who only plays other peoples music cant make their own. perhaps they just dont like what they write. its like this interview i saw with a guy who does a clapton tribute. he said he just enjoys playing claptons songs more than his own.

besides, there is already a definition of what a musician is, and it includes people who play music, not just write.
#28
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
whos to say they cant though? you are assuming someone who only plays other peoples music cant make their own. perhaps they just dont like what they write. its like this interview i saw with a guy who does a clapton tribute. he said he just enjoys playing claptons songs more than his own.

besides, there is already a definition of what a musician is, and it includes people who play music, not just write.


Yes, but like I said. I don't care. To me someone who makes their own music is one. I remember a thread on here once where a lot of people felt the way I do about the names guitarist and musician.
Quote by Tyler Durden
It's only after we've lost everything that we're free to do anything.

Erowid
#29
Quote by foo_diddles
Anyone can play someone else's piece give a few weeks. How many ten year old "prodigies" can WRITE an emotionally moving piece of music? after all a prodigy writes their own stuff right?


This. Some people are naturally inclined fur music, think perfect pitch. They are impressive to watch, they are quite proficient, but I wouldn't go as far as to say they are impossibly ahead of everyone else. I think a big problem is that musicians often forget that music is an art, not a competition. I've known guys who can throw out Necrophagist riffs like nobody's business, but have sat down and boggled at how I could write a full song on my own.

Taking the time to sit down and truly understand music theory helps to close the gap, along with learning proper form. Once a performer secures those, improvement comes much quicker.

On another note, 1 hour a day is perfectly reasonable for practice for anybody. Extended practice sessions are prone to diminishing returns and only cause unnecessary fatigue.

Edit: So nobody gets the wrong idea, I'm not trying to downplay the achievement of a good performance, which can be an art in itself, it just isn't the end all to comparisons.
Last edited by Sabaren at Nov 29, 2009,
#30
Quote by RockGuitar92
Yes, but like I said. I don't care. To me someone who makes their own music is one. I remember a thread on here once where a lot of people felt the way I do about the names guitarist and musician.

So the Jonas Brothers are musicians, but a violinist playing in the London Symphony Orchestra who doesn't write his/her own music isn't?

People who are good enough to play music to such a high standard almost always have the ability to compose. You rarely get the ability to play without the ability to compose (I've never met anyone who can play brilliantly but can't compose).

As I mentioned earlier, I know a guy who got into the National Youth Orchestra (UK) and he can write music so effortlessly yet he doesn't plans to make a living through writing. I've known others who are not as good but also very talented and they can all compose.

I think the misconception about composing and playing being totally separate comes from people who have learnt how to play through sheer persistence. These people can often be high grades on their instrument because they have spent ages learning the pieces (but not learning much musicianship along the way).

I would guess (although of course I couldn't be certain) that a lot of the people who have posted have seen people like this who are in their teens and are "good" just because they have got a high grade but aren't actually very musically talented, so can't compose well.

These people are not prodigies and if you took someone with little musical talent and even if you taught these people from the age of 1 they would never achieve the musicianship enough to play in a proffesional symphony orchestra etc.

Edit:
Quote by Sabaren
I've known guys who can throw out Necrophagist riffs like nobody's business, but have sat down and boggled at how I could write a full song on my own.

These people are prime examples of people who are not prodigies, they are just people who have invested enough time into playing that they can now play fast (I'd wonder whether they could play anything very expressively though).
Last edited by 12345abcd3 at Nov 29, 2009,
#31
Often when I hear of people my age who also play guitar and do so well I get these kinda aggressive, territorial feelings that I'm, well, ashamed of. I try to convert that energy into motivation to practice more and play better.

But I think people that simply pick up an instrument and are amazing at it with little practice or time spent are unlucky. I feel glad that it took time, practice and bonding with the instrument to be able to do what I can do today.
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#32
Quote by RockGuitar92
Yes, but like I said. I don't care. To me someone who makes their own music is one. I remember a thread on here once where a lot of people felt the way I do about the names guitarist and musician.

again, you dont know that they dont make their own music. therefor, your opinion isnt very valid. you just assume because you only have heard certain musicians play other peoples songs that its all they do. besides, even if you only do other peoples songs, it will never sound 100% the same. everyone is different and anytime you play something, its going to be original to you.

"making" music doesnt need to mean actually making new music. you can make music as long as you have an instrument. music doesnt just exist out in the air. people have to make it happen. those people are musicians. technically, that could be anyone. but whether or not they are any good at it is a different story.

now most people who can hit a drum or strum a few chords dont call themselves musicians just because they dont identify with the term.

and you cant be a guitarist and not a musician. a "guitarist" implies they are a musician who plays the guitar. again, not up for debate. some people could argue though the difference between someone who plays gutiar, and a guitarist. one would be someone who knows a couple of songs, gets out the ol guitar every once in a while. the other would be someone who is more deicated to making music on a regular basis. almost anyone knows something on guitar. but few actually identify with the term gutiarist, or even musician. thats really the big difference here between a musician and a non musician: whether or not the identify with the term. for example, i play some harmonica, mandolin, bass, and piano. but i dont feel right saying im a harmonica player, or bassist, or pianist, or whatever. i can get by on them, but i identify myself with guitar playing. i think the devotion is what makes someone identify with those terms.